Category Archives: Uncategorized

The Ambassador of Hindu-Muslim unity – BJP’s Jaswant revises Jinnah

 

VIEW: BJP’s Jaswant revises Jinnah —Karan Thapar

Jaswant Singh’s view of Jinnah is markedly different to the accepted Indian image. He sees him as a nationalist. In fact, the author accepts that Jinnah was a great Indian. I’ll even add he admires Jinnah and I’m confident he won’t disagree

There’s a book published tomorrow that deserves to be widely read and I want to be the first to draw your attention to it. It’s Jaswant Singh’s biography of Jinnah. Read on and you’ll discover why.

Continue reading The Ambassador of Hindu-Muslim unity – BJP’s Jaswant revises Jinnah

Founder of Pakistan’s Historic Speech

Founder of Pakistan’s Historic Speech – To the first of Constitutional Assembly (11th Aug 1947)

Presidential Address to the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan on 11th August, 1947

Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen,

I cordially thank you with the utmost sincerity, for the honor you have conferred upon me -the greatest honor that is possible for this Sovereign Assembly to confer-by electing me as your first President. I also thank those leaders who have spoken in appreciation of my services and their personal references to me. I sincerely hope that with your support and your cooperation we shall make this Constituent Assembly an example to the world. The Constituent Assembly has got two main functions to perform. The first is the very onerous and responsible task of framing our future Constitution of Pakistan and the second of functioning as a full and complete Sovereign body as the Federal Legislature of Pakistan. We have to do the best we can in adopting a provincial constitution for the Federal Legislature of Pakistan. You know really that not only we ourselves are wondering but, I think, the whole world is wondering at this unprecedented cyclone revolution which has brought about the plan of creating and establishing two independent Sovereign Dominions in this sub-continent. As it is, it has been unprecedented; there is no parallel in the history of the world. This mighty sub-continent with all kinds of inhabitants has been brought under a plan which is titanic, unknown, and unparalleled. And what is very important with regard to it is that we have achieved it peacefully and by means of an evolution of the greatest possible character.

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Sain Logon Ki Hukomat Hay (Sindhis rule the country)!?? – but the facts speak loudly!!

Only 1000 Sindhi employees out of 86,000 federal employees. Islamabad needs to open its eyes – PPP too!

Ratio of Sindhis in Federal jobs, please click here to read a News item in urdu

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Representation of Sindhis in Federal Govt Jobs: What do the facts & figures say?
A lead article Published in Sindhi Daily

by Sohail Memon

This is a strange thing that Sindhi speaking come across whenever PPP comes in Government, we are told that ‘Saiin: it is your (Sindhis) government’, despite the fact the Prime Minister is from Multan, who belongs to Punjab’s Siraiki belt. Well, to some extent this perception is right because after all PPP is led by Sindhi leadership. President Zardari is also a Sindhi speaking, thus we hear frequently “Sain Logon Ki Hukomat Hay” (Sindhis rule the country) but the reality is different, rather contradicts this perception, government ministries and departments are still filled up with hundreds of Gen. Musharraf’s era contractual employees from lower grade to higher rank, people continue to work who were appointed by Gen. Musharraf, and in his era Sindhis were banned from jobs, government jobs were prohibited to Sindhis.

Continue reading Sain Logon Ki Hukomat Hay (Sindhis rule the country)!?? – but the facts speak loudly!!

Jami Chandio’s Article – Plight of Sindhis

jamichandioHow does the establishment want to design and see Sindh?
By: Jami Chandio
“There is no little enemy”-Franklin

Introduction

Though all the oppressed nations and classes of Pakistan have been exploited by the excesses, plundering, conspiracies and vested interests of the establishment which represents ruling classes; Sindh and Sindhi people have been the biggest victim. The dreams and promises that had inspired Sindh to join Pakistan have been shattered badly with the passage of time. The ruthlessness of history is that this tragic and terrifying story does not seem to be coming to an end so far. For the people struggling for the freedom, salvation, progress and transition of Sindh, it is highly imperative to understand as to how the establishment wants to design and see Sindh as a province, society and nation. Of course, this structure of evil machinations is impossible for them to run without hidden conspiracies and cruel strategies. Therefore, it is a must to study the basics of their foundations and strategies. For only then can a counter-strategy for this could be framed and operated. In this article we will cast a look at the ill-motivated designs and cynical strategies of the establishment about Sindh.

Continue reading Jami Chandio’s Article – Plight of Sindhis

Contributions of Z.A. Bhutto & Benazir Bhutto for welfare of Sindh and Sindhis

by Khalid Hashmani
After realizing that the representation of Sindhis was substantially lower than their population, he secured buy-in from of the Pakistani establishment to reserve 19% Federal jobs for Sindh with 60% and 40% allocation between rural and urban areas respectively. The nationalization of Banks, Insurance companies, and Heavy Industries further expanded this coverage to a part of private sector as well.

Those who went to Sindh’s colleges and universities (including Sindh University) in mid sixties know that only about 30% of students were Sindhis. Z. A. Bhutto played a key role in establishing a quota system with 60%-40% rural-urban distribution.

Helped to open seven or eight major institutions in Sindh (including Khairpur University, Chandka Medical College, Nawabshah Engineering College, Nawabshah Girls Medical College, etc.) thereby substantially increasing educational opportunities for Sindhis.

Continue reading Contributions of Z.A. Bhutto & Benazir Bhutto for welfare of Sindh and Sindhis

The Discrimination and Denial of Fundamental Rights for the People of Sindh

Kavita Tekchandani

Pakistan was created out of the Indian partition of 1947, following two centuries of British colonial rule. Its creation was the consequence of an inability to accommodate minority interests within independent India. The Muslim minority within India feared they would become second-class citizens in a Hindu-majority state. The Muslim League, therefore, pushed to form an independent Muslim state. The partition, the arbitrary drawing of borders, resulted in eight million people, mainly Muslims migrating from India to Pakistan and millions of Sikhs and Hindus migrating from Pakistan to India making it the largest inter-state migration in history and, in the process, creating millions of refugees.

Continue reading The Discrimination and Denial of Fundamental Rights for the People of Sindh

Gorakh hill station was G.M. Sayed’s idea

Hill Stations for Sindh.
Gorakh as a hill station was G.M. Sayed’s idea. Gorakh is known to Sindhi Sufis, as Gorakh Nath a Bikshu saint of the Buddhist Times is reported to have come there, mediated and preached against worshipped of Buddha, who himself had forbidden any worshipped of idols. This may be a folk-story, beyond which Gorakh has no merit as hill-station. G.M. Sayed had taken Pirzada Abdul Sattarto Gaj Bungalow on way to Gorakh in 1954. None of the two ever reached Gorakh. I went to G.M. Sayed and discussed with him that Gorakh peak was about 5600 feet high but the last 1200 feet of peak were very steep. The flat-land below it was only 4300 feet high and only about 400 to 500 acres in area. Being on 26th parallel, it could not be cooler than Quetta, which having the same height was on 30th parallel. Quetta is warm in June-July and Gorakh would be warmer than it by one or two degree centigrade. It would be preferable to develop Dharhiaro, which is about 6500 feet high and has a plateau of 5700 acres. I told him that I was planning to go there and spend, few days at end of May and early june, measure temperatures, and plan what is possible. I did visit the site, prepared plans for a deciduous farm there, but the Government of West Pakistan dropped the scheme on the pea that there are more feasible areas for deciduous fruits in the northern areas of West Pakistan.
Source – http://panhwar.com/Article36.htm

What is a Sensory defensiveness condition?

Some common symptoms of sensory defensiveness condition- Dislikes touches, hugs, scratching or rubbing the spot that has been touched. Reacts badly to light, anxiety, and aggression. Fussy about tags, collars, textures, difficult to adjust to cloths or uncomfortable to cloths, skin rashes, uncomfortable to some rags and fabrics, dislikes the touches of animals, very ticklish, irritation with brushing hair or shampoo, easily gets cold, hot, uncomfortable to noise and sound, irritated to light or sun light, fear to elevator, heights, stairs, irritation with odors and perfumes, cleaning supplies, soaps, lotions, irritation with grass, fears all the time, get sick easily, over excited, sneezing, coughing, irritation to vacuum cleaners, toilet flush, fear of dentist, irritation with vibration, sensitive feelings to different things etc. If you have above symptoms or symptoms like that, it means you have sensory defensiveness condition .

If you have sensory defensiveness condition, it means you have vulnerable nervous system, digestive system, allergies, leaky gut syndrome, and parasite over growth in colon. The relationship between allergies and sensory defensiveness is well known.

This may help: Cut sugar and sugar products, wheat and wheat products, peanuts, prawns/shrimps, rice and rice products, potato and potato products from your diet. Eat grape fruit, avoid the environment with gives you allergies, avoid constipation, limit carbohydrates, and take multi-minerals and multi-vitamins, eat washed fresh green leafy vegetable, use garlic and ginger in your food if you are not allergic to them, chew your food well, eat deep water fish, avoid process foods, eat papaya and radish, use black pepper and raw seeds, drink 8 to 10 glasses of clean fresh water, take yogurt early in the morning with full glass of water every day to introduce pro-biotic bacteria (friendly bacteria of yogurt to you digestive system.

Is there feudalism in Pakistan?

By: Haider Nizamani, Canada

FOR the MQM leader Altaf Hussain and Ayesha Siddiqa, ‘feudalism’ is alive and kicking in Pakistan. According to the MQM’s 2008 election manifesto “the prevalent feudal system of (sic) Pakistan is the main obstacle in the progress of the country and the prosperity of the people”.

The party would abolish ‘feudalism’ to turn Pakistan into an egalitarian society. Ayesha Siddiqa, writing in these pages on Feb 25, 2008, started on a circumspect note by acknowledging that if we use the classical features of feudalism then present-day Pakistani society cannot be called feudal. Then she asked a question and offered a categorical answer too: “But does this … mean that feudalism is no more? The answer is no.”

Why? Because, agricultural land still remains a potent symbol of power in today’s Pakistan. The urban elite’s penchant for farmhouses is mimicking landlords. Furthermore, the occupants of these farmhouses replicate “the decadent lifestyle of the old nawabs and the feudal elite” by holding “huge parties, mujrahs and … flaunting … money”.

Many members in the national and provincial legislatures have landed backgrounds. Rural Pakistan continues to languish under the yoke of ‘feudalism’. Honour killings occur there, hapless peasants are exploited by the mighty landlord. The electronic media has perpetuated this same image for years. In Punjab, it was Chaudhri Hashmat of the drama serial Waris who reigned supreme. Since land is a symbol of power and these are the kind of social practices we won’t associate with modernity, Pakistan is deemed a predominantly feudal society.

My submission is that there is no feudalism in Pakistan today because there was no feudalism even before British colonialism.

Eqbal Ahmed, also in these pages (‘Feudal culture and violence’, Feb 2, 1998) summarised it well: “Feudalism serves as the whipping boy of Pakistan’s intelligentsia. Yet, to my knowledge not one serious study exists on the nature and extent of feudal power in Pakistan, and none to my knowledge on the hegemony which feudal culture enjoys in this country.”

Observing that feudalism as an economic system was not ascendant, he referred to Karl Marx’s point that the cultural vestiges of dying systems continue long after economic collapse. Ahmed was dead right in mentioning ‘mastery over violence’ as one of the defining features of the feudal order. Rather than rigorously testing whether that was the case in Pakistan, Ahmed wandered off into discussion of various forms of violence in Pakistani society.

We, therefore, need to exercise utmost caution in naming a system on the basis of practices that could well be just the remnants of a pre-capitalist system but not necessarily the defining parameter of the existing political economy.

When the British colonised India, they took on many forms of the local aristocracy. That did not make British rule a feudal form of governance. The urbanites’ mimicry of the landed gentry’s power is neither a uniquely Pakistani trait nor a recent phenomenon. The irony of the ascendant moneyed form of power trying to copy the dying agrarian source of power is vividly portrayed in Satyajit Ray’s film Jalsaghar (‘The Music Room’) where a nouveau-riche merchant tries to adopt some aspects of an indebted landlord’s lifestyle.

The Pakistani privileged class trying to recreate the opulence of an aristocratic era is an expression of what Marx put eloquently: “The tradition of all dead generations weighs like a nightmare on the brains of the living.” But taking mujrahs in farmhouses for feudalism in Pakistan is mistaking appearances for substance.

Feudalism, according to Simon Bromley and William Brown, can be defined “politically as a personalised and geographically decentralised system of rule, and economically as the local and coercive extraction of surplus from a dependent peasantry, the two dimensions being fused in the institution of lordship and the feudal-vassal pyramid”. By 1999, 88 per cent of cultivated land in Pakistan was in farm sizes below 12.5 acres. Just over half the total farms in 1999 were less than five acres in size. This would hardly be the hallmark of a feudal society.

More important than haggling over whether contemporary Pakistan is a feudal society or not — because it would hardly qualify as a feudal society if judged by the characteristics of the feudal society provided by leading authorities on the issue — I want to share Harbans Mukhia’s argument that there never was feudalism even in medieval India. If this assertion is taken seriously, then it means that if there was no feudalism in medieval India how could we have it in 21st century Pakistan?

Let me paraphrase Mukhia’s reasons for reaching the above conclusion. Mukhia argues that “in Europe, feudalism arose as a result of a crisis of the production relations based on slavery on the one hand and changes resulting from growing stratification among the Germanic tribes on the other”. In India “owing to the natural richness of the soil and the relatively efficient tools and techniques, agricultural productivity was high, the subsistence level of the peasant was very low — thanks to climatic conditions”. Due to the combination of the above features, the production process in India “did not create an acute scarcity of labour”, therefore “enserfment of the peasant … was hardly necessary”.

This does not mean there was no stratification and exploitation in medieval India, just as there is no denying the stratification in contemporary Pakistan’s countryside. But using feudalism as a blanket term for sundry processes in the agrarian sector and evading “critical considerations such as production processes, social organisation of labour and concrete forms of non-economic coercion” will lead to anecdotal observations or politically expedient statements passing as historical analyses.

Pakistani society is part of the world capitalist system where a major share of agricultural produce is meant for selling in the market. Additionally, there is no causal link between land ownership and political power in today’s Pakistan. The land-owning classes, especially absentee landlords, rank high in the pecking order of rural Pakistan. But that ‘rural gentry’, to use Satish Chandra’s appropriate term for the class of people popularly called ‘feudal’ in Pakistan, is a junior partner in the state where those having mastery over violence have much closer ties with metropolitan power centres like Washington and London.

Exchanges in these pages are valuable but we need to rise up to the challenge Eqbal Ahmed threw at us. Let those among us who are serious about understanding issues concerning the exercise of power in our society undertake rigorous studies on these questions. Reputable historians like Mubarak Ali and other social scientists should be invited to share their insights and arguments on whether there is ‘feudalism’ in Pakistan.

The writer teaches at the School of International Studies, Simon Fraser University, Canada. He can be reached at hnizamani@hotmail.com

Courtesy: Daily Dawn, April 30, 2008

Bona fide albeit (Hearing loud BOOM when sleeping)

You are awakened by loud explosions and no one else hear them, it may all in your head. Hearing loud sounds is called bona fide, albeit rare condition or exploding head syndrome. They usually stop after few weeks or months. exploding head syndrome makes people very scary who experienced it. Mostly old people experience it and scientist still don’t know the causes of Boom syndrome and its link to different medical problems.

Depression and Anxiety

Depression and Anxiety are major public health problems that are reaching epidemic levels all over the world. Untreated anxiety and depression, rob people of their very own lives through suicide and self destructive behaviors. Unfortunately, Suicide has tripled among teenagers in Sindh, Pakistan.

Many people felt that depression and anxiety were the result of a weak will, evil and bad character or Sin; but it is not true. Recent brain science has clearly revealed these disorders are in large part the result of Brain dysfunction.

Empires of the Indus: The Story of a River

Courtesy: Empiresof the Sindh

One of the longest rivers in the world, the Indus rises in Tibet, flows west across India, and south through Pakistan. For millennia it has been worshiped as a god; for centuries used as a tool of imperial expansion. Today it is the glue of Pakistan‘s fractious union.

Publication date: 15 May 2008, Published by John Murray

Continue reading Empires of the Indus: The Story of a River

Eat Right

The most immediate benefit from adopting a healthy diet is that it can lower blood pressure.
For people with hypertension, the low-sodium food (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet- which emphasizes fruits, vegetables, low-fat diary and high-fiber grains-can reduce blood pressure as effectively as taking an anti-hypertension drug.
In addition, the extra calcium in the diet could help reduce the risk of osteoporosis. The fiber in the fruits, vegetables and grains can help control blood-glucose levels in many Type 2 diabetics and even lower the need for medication. Over the long term, healthy diet may help diminish the risk of some types of cancer. “It’s a diet for all diseases,” says Doctors
.

Choose a life that matters>>

Ready or not!

– Michael Josephson

*Someday it will all come to an end.* *There will be no more sunrises,* *No minutes, hours or days.* *All the things you collected,* *Whether treasured or forgotten,* *Will pass to someone else.* *Your wealth, fame and temporal power* *Will shrivel to irrelevance. * *It will not matter what you owned* *Or what you were owed.* *Your grudges, resentments, frustrations, * *And jealousies will finally disappear.* *So, too, your hopes, ambitions, plans,* *And to-do lists will expire.* *The wins and losses* *That once seemed so important* *Will fade away.* *It won’t matter where you came from,* *Or on what side of the tracks you lived*

*At the end.*

*It won’t matter whether you were beautiful or brilliant.* *Even your gender and skin color will be irrelevant.*

*So what will matter?* *How will the value of your days be measured?* *What will matter is not what you bought,* *But what you built,* *Not what you got,* *But what you gave.* *What will matter is not your success* *But your significance. * *What will matter is not what you learned,* *But what you taught.* *What will matter is every day acts * *of integrity, compassion,courage or sacrifice* *That enriched, empowered or encouraged others* *To emulate your example.* *What will matter is not your competence,* *But your character.* *What will matter is not how many people you knew,* *But how many will feel a lasting loss*

*When you are gone.*

*What will matter is not your memories,* *But the memories that live in those who loved you.* *What will matter is how long you will be remembered,* *By whom and for what.* *Living a life that matters doesn’t happen by accident.* *It’s not a matter of circumstance but of choice.* *Choose a life that matters.*

Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL)?

One day you wake up to find that you suddenly can’t hear than you may experiencing sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) or called sudden deafness. Some times the hearing loss develops only in one ear over 72 hours or less. This kind of hearing loss can happen 30 to 60 year old people often with dizziness. Sudden hearing loss may be a sign of several serious conditions such as Meniere’s disease and acoustic neuinner ear disease (AIED), an inflammatory ear disorder in that immune system mistakenly attacks to it’s own inner ear cells. It may also point to serious autonomic systemic disorders, multiple sclerosis, bacterial or viral infection or tumor in the brain. Treatment: Go to the doctor and stop consuming sugar and sugar products, drink 8 to 10 crystal lean fresh water, take multi-vitamin & multi-minerals.

Have you encountered these situations…

· After your hands become coated with grease, your nose will begin to itch. – · Any tool, when dropped, will roll to the least accessible corner. – · When you dial a wrong number, you always get through and never get it engaged one. – · If you use the excuse that you were late for work because you had a flat tire, the next morning you will actually have a flat tire. – · If you change queues, the one you have left will start to move faster than the one you are in now. – · As soon as you have immersed yourself fully in the bathtub, the telephone bell will ring. – · The probability of meeting someone you know increases when you are in a situation where you do not want to be seen by anybody. – · When you try to prove to the repairman that a machine/computer/ mobile doesn’t work, it will. – · The severity of the itch is inversely proportional to the reachability of the area. – · At any event, the people whose seats are furthest from the aisle arrive last. – · As soon as you sit down to a cup of hot coffee/tea, your boss will ask you to do something which will last until the coffee/tea is cold. – · When you are working late, the boss will never be around. When you are surfing the net or gossiping, the boss will always drop by. * Sure you have encountered some of these, amazing? Isn’t it? * *These are univeral Rules for which reasons are not-known …*

Piece of Alzheimer’s puzzle found

Scientists discover a certain type of protein in brain causes Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers have uncovered a new clue to the cause of Alzheimer’s disease. The brains of people with the memory- robbing form of dementia are cluttered with a plaque made up of beta-amyloid, a sticky protein. But there long has been a question whether this is a cause of the disease or a side effect. Also involved are tangles of a protein called tau; some scientists suspect this the cause.

Mother Tongue Absent in Thousands of Classrooms

by: Haider Rizvi

Courtesy: Wichaar.com, July 17th, 2009

UNITED NATIONS, Jul 16 (IPS) – Millions of children across the world fail to receive a basic education not only because they are born into poverty, but because local authorities do not allow them to read and write in their native language at school. According to a study released Thursday by a London-based rights advocacy group, more than 100 million children in the world are out of school, and most – estimated between 50 and 70 percent – are minorities or indigenous peoples. In “The State of the World’s Minorities and Indigenous Peoples 2009”, prepared in collaboration with the U.N.’s children agency UNICEF, Minority Rights Group International (MRG) details how minority and indigenous children have been systematically excluded, discriminated against, or are too poor to afford an education.

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Lead is all around us

Although it is not normal to have lead in the body, most people have a small amount of it in their system. High levels of lead can lead to behavioral and learning problems, hearing difficulties, and slowed growth. Prolonged exposure can harm the brain, nervous system, kidneys, and blood.  Lead is all around us. We can be be exposed to it from the food we eat, the water we drink, the dust we breathe in, and the paint on our walls.

Can Sindh Government construct a motorway connecting Karachi to Jacobabad

By Khalid Hashmani, McLean

On Friday (April 24, 2009), I attended an extremely informative presentation at the SAIS on the positive impact of Lahore-Islamabad Motorway on the surrounding rural villages of Punjab. I urge the Government of Sindh to construct a motorway connecting Karachi to Jacobabad to duplicate similar improvement around the villages of Sindh.

The presentation was made Ms. Mahvish Shami, who is currently pursuing PhD degree at the Development Studies Institute at London School of Economics. Incidentally, her village too is in the Hafizabad district of Punjab, where she conducted her study.

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Indus River- Indus Blind Dolphin faces the threat of ‘genocide’

wildlife- Blind extinction
Indus Blind Dolphin faces the threat of ‘genocide’ because Indus River faces record water shortage
By Yasir Babbar, Islamabad
Courtesy and Thanks: The News
Indus Blind Dolphin, a protected species, is fighting a war of survival in the Indus River because of record water shortage. The required water level in the reserve stretch of 210 kilometres for blind dolphin is at least 40 thousand cusecs. Only 10 to 15 thousand cusecs of water is currently available which makes breeding extremely difficult for the world renowned Indus Blind Dolphin.

Continue reading Indus River- Indus Blind Dolphin faces the threat of ‘genocide’

Pakistan: sixty-two years after birth

nawaz_wali_zardariBy B. R. Gowani

Courtesy: Globeistan

President is billionaire

Main opponent, twice in power, also a billionaire

The ruling clique is bloody rich

Country has nuclear weapons

Additionally, the world’s Master is kind

And provides the protective shelter

In this country’s biggest city

A kindly man was distributing:

Continue reading Pakistan: sixty-two years after birth

GENDER AND DIABETES

Deaths from cardiovascular disease are declining among men with diabetes, but not women, a new study suggest. Among diabetic patients with existing cardiovascular disease, researchers found women were 5.4 per cent less likely than men to have systolic blood pressures at recommended levels, and 5.9 per cent less likely to have their  LDL- cholesterol under control.

Marjor Cardiovascular Risk Factors

Diabetes has long been liked to chronic kidney disease but now it also consider a culprit of cardiovascular disease. Diabetics cannot control the level of glucose/ sugar in the blood. Sugar is one of the nutrients that the body uses for energy. Insulin is made by the pancreas allows the cells to absorb sugar from the blood. In diabetes, either the body produces insufficient insulin, or the cells of the body no longer respond normally to insulin. High blood sugar stresses and damages cells, especially the filtering capillaries in the kidneys and the capillaries in the back of the eyes suffer from suffer from increased blood pressure and lead to vision loss. People with diabetes often also have high blood cholesterol and high triglycerides to contributes to atherosclerosis leads to heart attacks and strokes.