Category Archives: Health

After biometric system, new radio frequency ID cards for all staff of LRH Peshawar are must now from 18th Jan 2016

 

Read more » Daily Express
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ee more »  http://www.express.com.pk/epaper/PoPupwindow.aspx?newsID=1103298114&Issue=NP_PEW&Date=20160120

 

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How Pakistan’s National Health Insurance Program Will Work

Health insurancePakistan’s government launched a national health insurance program for its poorest households Thursday, marking the start of the most-ambitious public health project in the country’s history.

The Prime Minister’s National Health Program will from Thursday cover families that make less than $2 a day through a gradual rollout. In the first phase, over 3 million families will get health insurance in 23 districts, with the ultimate aim to cover 22 million households across the country, officials said.

This is another step towards the welfare state that we promised to create when we came into power,”said Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif.

The Pakistani government already subsidizes health care to varying degrees in public hospitals, but officials acknowledge these facilities are unable to handle the patient load or achieve public health targets.

The government said earlier this year that it wouldn’t be able to meet the United Nation’s targets for child and maternal mortality rates that formed part of the Millennium Development Goals, which had a deadline of 2015. Critics have blamed Pakistan’s low health spending and inadequate management as key factors in the poor health provision. Between July 2014 and March 2015, Pakistan spent just 0.42% of its GDP on health. The U.S. government spends about 8.3% of GDP on healthcare.

The new insurance program will cover treatment at both public and private hospitals. Private hospitals that sign up will then be offered loans on easy terms to upgrade their facilities, officials said, without providing further details about interest rates and conditions.

Saira Afzal Tarar, minister of state for health Services, regulations and coordination, said most Pakistanis pay out of pocket for treatment. “There is treatment at government-run hospitals, but there are long lines. Those who don’t have a recommendation have to wait months for treatment,” Ms. Tarar said at the launch ceremony in Islamabad. “With this [health insurance] card, you’ll be able to go to the hospitals where you weren’t allowed to even go to the front door. Now, you’ll be treated there with dignity and respect.” Ms. Tarar said.

Read more » The Wall Street Journal
See more » http://blogs.wsj.com/indiarealtime/2015/12/31/how-pakistans-national-health-insurance-program-will-work/

National Health Insurance Scheme to cover 100 million Pakistanis

By APP

ISLAMABAD: Prime Minister Mian Muhammad Nawaz Sharif on Thursday approved the National Health Insurance Scheme aimed at providing health care to some 100 million people in Pakistan.

The prime minister chaired a meeting to give in principle approval to launch the Health Insurance Program. The meeting was attended by Minister for Finance Ishaq Dar, Chairperson PM’s Youth Program Maryam Nawaz, Minister of State for Health Saira Afzal Tarrar, and senior officers of the health and finance ministries.

Maryam Nawaz, the architect of the scheme, gave a detailed briefing to the Prime Minister in which comparative study of major health blanket models of the European Union, United States and India and options for implementing the scheme in Pakistan were discussed.

“A health insurance programme is the only way forward to provide health care protection to economically deprived people of the society. The scheme is the first of its kind to introduce a grievance redressal system as well as social security safety net for the poor people of Pakistan,” he said.

PM Sharif said the programme will not only give the vulnerable sections of the society an access to cash free health facilities but will also help to develop and revolutionise the health infrastructure across Pakistan.

The prime minister further said the scheme will also increase public-private partnership in Pakistan and will open up further avenues for investment.”

The scheme would be completely apolitical and would provide a blanket for cash free treatment to the poor people of Pakistan for major diseases like cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and complications, burns and RTA (life and limb saving treatment, implants, prosthesis), end stage renal diseases and dialysis, chronic infections (hepatitis), organ failure (hepatic, renal, cardiopulmonary) and cancer treatment.

The meeting also decided to establish the first ever public sector human organ transplant center in Islamabad.

The prime minister directed the Ministries of Finance and Health to coordinate and finalise the technical modalities and implementation strategy in minimum possible time so that an early relief could be given to the people.

News courtesy: DAWN
Read more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1110761

Prescription from Pakistan: How one hospital is a model for Asia

Pakistan’s dismal public health system is rife with mismanagement and a paucity of resources.

Amidst this shambolic system, one hospital in Karachi has been providing specialised healthcare to millions.

Free of charge.

As the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation celebrated 40 years of successful service, Dr Sanjay Nagral visited the facility and met the man who helms it, armed with the simple philosophy that ‘No person should die only because they are unable to afford medical expenses.’

Read more » Rediff News
See more » http://www.rediff.com/news/special/prescription-from-pakistan-how-one-hospital-is-a-model-for-asia/20151224.htm

Pakistan’s population bomb: 240 million in 2030

BY ZOFEEN T. EBRAHIM

Fifteen-year-old Nasreen Qutubuddin beams happily at her mother, Haseena Bibi, and says: “Now that she is well all I want is to get some good uninterrupted sleep.”

Belonging to Alipur village in Muzaffargarh, they made a 24-hour bus journey to reach Koohi Goth Women’s Hospital in Karachi to get the mother treated for a serious child-birth injury she suffered and which left her incontinent.

In Pakistan, six million married women say they don’t want more children or want to space births, but are unable to do so.

Termed obstetric fistula, in the world of medicine, it is caused by long and stressful labour. In its fight to come out and unable to, the baby’s head puts undue pressure on the lining of the woman’s birth canal causing the wall of the rectum or bladder to tear resulting in urinary or fecal incontinence.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1221289/

 

Live tapeworm pulled from California man’s brain

A California man is recovering after he had a live tapeworm removed from his brain during emergency surgery.

Luis Ortiz was admitted to a hospital in Napa with what he called the worst headache of his life.

In a brain scan, neurosurgeon Soren Singel discovered the larva of a tapeworm and told Mr Ortiz he had about 30 minutes to live.

The tapeworm grew inside a cyst that cut off circulation and water flow to the rest of his brain.

“I stood up and then I threw up,” said Mr Ortiz. “The doctor pulled it out and he said it was still wiggling, and I’m like ‘Ugh, that doesn’t sound too good.'”

Read more » BBC
See more » http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-34732010

‘Milestone’ prostate cancer drug

The first drug that targets precise genetic mutations in prostate cancer has been shown to be effective in a “milestone” trial by UK scientists.

The study, at the Institute of Cancer Research in London, took place on 49 men with untreatable cancer.

The drug, olaparib, had low overall success, but slowed tumour growth in 88% of patients with specific DNA mutations.

Cancer Research UK said the trial was exciting.

The future of cancer medicine is treating cancers by their mutated DNA rather than what part of the body they are in.

Read more » BBC
See more » http://www.bbc.com/news/health-34649024

Cure for cancer might accidentally have been found, and it could be malaria

By attaching malaria proteins to cancer cells, tumours could be burrowed into and then destroyed — and it seems to be effective on 90 per cent of types of cancers

By Andrew Griffin@_andrew_griffin

Scientists might have accidentally made a huge step forward in the search for a cure for cancer — discovering unexpectedly that a malaria protein could be an effective weapon against the disease.

Danish researchers were hunting for a way of protecting pregnant women from malaria, which can cause huge problems because it attacks the placenta. But they found at the same time that armed malaria proteins can attack cancer, too — an approach which could be a step towards curing the disease.

Scientists have combined the bit of protein that the malaria vaccine uses to bury into cells and combined it with a toxin — that can then bury into cancer cells and release the toxin, killing them off.

The scientists have found that in both cases the malria protein attaches itself to the same carbohydrate. It is the similarities between those two things that the cure could exploit.

The carbohydrate ensures that the placenta grows quickly. But the team behind the new findings have detailed how it serves the same function in tumours — and the malaria parasite attaches itself to the cancerous cells in the same way, meaning that it can kill them off.

Read more » Independent
See more » http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/cure-for-cancer-might-accidentally-have-been-found-and-it-could-be-malaria-a6693601.html

Charity beyond borders: Indian NGO raises funds for Pakistani girl’s treatment

BY DAWN.COM

MUMBAI: As tensions between India and Pakistan run high and leaders from either side lock horns over a range of political differences, a rare act of kindness from across the border might have changed a Pakistani girl’s life forever.

An Indian non-governmental organisation (NGO) has raised almost Indian Rs1.3 million in funds for the treatment of a young Pakistani girl, who suffers from Wilson’s disease — a rare genetic disorder, said a reportpublished on The Time of India.

Saba Tariq Ahmed, a 15-year-old Karachi resident, returned home along with her mother Nazia, after undergoing treatment for the disorder — that results in poisonous accumulation of copper in the body — at Jaslok Hospital in Mumbai.

TOI quoted Jaslok hospital CEO Dr Taran Gainchandani as saying: “Saba and her mother, Nazia, boarded an afternoon flight for Karachi. They were extremely happy about how well the treatment worked for Saba.”

According to the report, Saba’s family was assisted financially for her treatment twice between April and October, 2015.

In April-May, an NGO, Bluebells Community, raised INR 700,000 from Mumbai citizens. “But Saba did not respond too well to the regularly prescribed medicines for Wilson’s disease,” TOI quoted liver specialist Dr Aabha Nagral, who has been treating the teen, as saying.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1212816/charity-beyond-borders-indian-ngo-raises-funds-for-pakistani-girls-treatment

Travelling to work ‘is work’, European court rules

Time spent travelling to and from first and last appointments by workers without a fixed office should be regarded as working time, the European Court of Justice has ruled.

This time has not previously been considered as work by many employers.

It means firms including those employing care workers, gas fitters and sales reps may be in breach of EU working time regulations.

BBC legal correspondent Clive Coleman said it could have a “huge effect”.

“Employers may have to organise work schedules to ensure workers’ first and last appointments are close to their homes,” he added.

‘Health and safety’

Chris Tutton, from the solicitors Irwin Mitchell, told the BBC: “Thousands of employers may now potentially be in breach of working time regulation rules in the UK.”

The court said its judgement was about protecting the “health and safety” of workers as set out in the European Union’s working time directive.

The directive is designed to protect workers from exploitation by employers, and it lays down regulations on matters such as how long employees work, how many breaks they have, and how much holiday they are entitled to.

One of its main goals is to ensure that no employee in the EU is obliged to work more than an average of 48 hours a week.

The ruling came about because of an ongoing legal case in Spain involving a company called Tyco, which installs security systems.

‘Bear the burden’

The company shut its regional offices down in 2011, resulting in employees travelling varying distances before arriving at their first appointment.

The court ruling said: “The fact that the workers begin and finish the journeys at their homes stems directly from the decision of their employer to abolish the regional offices and not from the desire of the workers themselves.

“Requiring them to bear the burden of their employer’s choice would be contrary to the objective of protecting the safety and health of workers pursued by the directive, which includes the necessity of guaranteeing workers a minimum rest period.”

Meanwhile, employment law barrister Caspar Glyn agreed the court’s decision could affect “millions of workers”.

However, Mr Glyn also said there had been much speculation that this ruling could allow workers on the national minimum wage to claim more money for the time they spend getting to work.

But he said this would not be the case.

“The national minimum wage is a UK right, it is not a European right. There’s no European right to a national minimum wage.

“The minimum wage regulations in the UK do not count as work travel from home or to any workplace,” he said.

News courtesy: BBC
Read more » http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-34210002

Weight loss surgery ‘cures half of type-2 diabetes cases’

Weight loss surgery cures half of patients with type-2 diabetes, for at least five years, a study suggests.

The trial, on 60 people, published in the Lancet, found none of those with type 2 had been cured by medication and diet alone.

The surgery improves symptoms both through weight loss and by changing the way the gut functions.

Experts said the results were “remarkable” and that too few people were getting access to the surgery.

The team, at King’s College London and the Universita Cattolica in Rome, compared standard drug therapy with surgery to rewire the digestive tract.

The operations reduced the size of the stomach and left less of the intestines exposed to food.

Prof Francesco Rubino, who operated on the patients, told the BBC News website: “Surgery is able to produce prolonged remission in 50% of cases, patients get to levels of blood sugar that is non-diabetes for five years.

“However, 80% who had surgery were able to maintain ‘optimal control’ [of blood sugar] despite only taking one drug or nothing at all.”

While some of those patients still had type-2 diabetes, they were easily keeping their sugar levels to recommended levels.

The patients who had surgery were also less likely to have heart problems, a common side-effect of uncontrolled diabetes, and reported improved quality of life.

Prof Rubino added: “Treating surgically, rather than medical therapy, appears more cost-effective, as there is less use of medication.”

The results were better two years after surgery. However, some patients relapsed in the past three years.

Continue reading Weight loss surgery ‘cures half of type-2 diabetes cases’

Test shows how old your body really is

Scientists say they have developed a way of testing how well, or badly, your body is ageing.

They say it could help predict when a person will die, identify those at high-risk of dementia and could affect medicine, pensions and insurance.

The team at King’s College London say looking at “biological age” is more useful than using a date of birth.

However, the work, published in Genome Biology, provides no clues as to how to slow the ageing process.

The test looks for an “ageing signature” in your body’s cells by comparing the behaviour of 150 genes.

It was developed by initially comparing 54,000 markers of gene activity in healthy, but largely sedentary, 25 and 65-year-olds and then whittling them down to a final 150.

Prof Jamie Timmons, from King’s College London, told the BBC News website: “There’s a healthy ageing signature that’s common to all our tissues, and it appears to be prognostic for a number of things including longevity and cognitive decline.

“It looks like from the age of 40 onwards you can use this to give guidance on how well an individual is ageing.”

Read more » BBC
Learn more » http://www.bbc.com/news/health-34153135

Ageing rates vary widely, says study

A study of people born within a year of each other has uncovered a huge gulf in the speed at which their bodies age.

The report, in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, tracked traits such as weight, kidney function and gum health.

Some of the 38-year-olds were ageing so badly that their “biological age” was on the cusp of retirement.

The team said the next step was to discover what was affecting the pace of ageing.

The international research group followed 954 people from the same town in New Zealand who were all born in 1972-73.

The scientists looked at 18 different ageing-related traits when the group turned 26, 32 and 38 years old.

The analysis showed that at the age of 38, the people’s biological ages ranged from the late-20s to those who were nearly 60.

“They look rough, they look lacking in vitality,” said Prof Terrie Moffitt from Duke University in the US.

The study said some people had almost stopped ageing during the period of the study, while others were gaining nearly three years of biological age for every twelve months that passed.

Continue reading Ageing rates vary widely, says study

Poverty: A Man Made Disaster On Planet Earth

By Nayyar N Khan

Oxfam Estimates That It Would Take $60 Billion Annually To End Extreme Global Poverty–That’s Less Than Quarter Of The Total Income Of Top 100 Richest Persons Living Amongst Us. 

IMAGINE, the everyday increasing poverty, the widening gap between haves and have not’s. Nature, the most gracious and merciful has granted more than enough resources in this universe that these resources could feed every living being. But we, the greedy human beings, are misusing these resources thus creating CRISIS OF “hunger and starvation” for not only human beings but many other creatures too on this planet. Today, more than 1.4 billion people around the world live in poverty- so extreme that they can barely survive- and around 25,000 people die from hunger each day whilst a new billionaire is created every second day.

The figures are frightening when we look at the map of the world populated by people, just like us. Nearly one half of the world’s population – more than 3 billion- live on less than $2.50 a day. More than 1.4 billion live in extreme poverty i.e. less than $1.25 a day. One billion children worldwide are living in poverty. More than 750 million people lack adequate access to clean drinking water. Diarrhea caused by lack of clean drinking water, sanitation, and hand hygiene kills an estimated 842,000 people every year globally, or approximately 2,300 people die per day.

165 million children under the age of 5 were stunted (reduced rate of growth and development) in 2011 due to chronic malnutrition. Preventable diseases like diarrhea and pneumonia take the lives of 2 million children per year as they are from such poor families who cannot afford proper treatment. As of 2013, 21.8 million children under 1 year of age worldwide did not receive the three recommended doses of vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis.

Imagine, if it were you who was forced to live on less than $1 a day, the same amount other people mindlessly spend on a bottle of water or a pack of cheap candy or gum. Imagine going to bed with empty stomach that night spent becomes unbearable.

1/4 of all humans live without electricity. Approximately 1.6 billion people. 80% of the world population lives on less than $10 a day. Oxfam estimates that it would take $60 billion annually to end extreme global poverty–that’s less than 1/4 the income of the top 100 richest persons living amongst us. The World Food Program says, “The poor are hungry and their hunger traps them in poverty.” Hunger is the number one cause of death in the world, killing more than HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that about 805 million people of the 7.3 billion people in the world, or one in nine, were suffering from chronic undernourishment in 2012-2014. Almost all the hungry people, 791 million, live in developing countries, representing 13.5 percent, or one in eight, of the population of developing counties.

Continue reading Poverty: A Man Made Disaster On Planet Earth

British superbug outbreak ‘could kill 80,000’

Exclusive: A Government report warns that tens of thousands could die because of new strains of bacteria and viruses resistant to drugs

By

Up to 80,000 people in Britain could die in a single outbreak of an infection due to a new generation of superbugs, according to an official Government forecast.

In total, some 200,000 people could be infected if a strain of disease resistant to antibiotics took hold, according to official forecasts which reveal the potential casualty toll for the first time.

Within 20 years, outbreaks of common flu could become “serious” for patients as drugs become useless and routine surgery could be curtailed due to the risk of infection, it is warned.

Scientists are increasingly concerned about the impact of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), which makes routine antibiotics or antivirals drugs ineffective against diseases that have formerly been brought under control.

It would mean that the huge gains made since the discovery of penicillin in curbing conditions such as pneumonia and tuberculosis and rendering surgery and childbirth safe could be lost.

David Cameron has warned that such a scenario would see the world “cast back into the dark ages of medicine”.

The new figures are given in the National Risk Register of Civil Emergencies, a document compiled by the Cabinet Office that assesses the challenges posed by terrorism, disease, natural disasters and industrial strife.

For the first time, it contains an assessment of the dangers posed by AMR, which it describes as a “particularly serious” issue for the UK.

The document says: “Without effective antibiotics, even minor surgery and routine operations could become high-risk procedures, leading to increased duration of illness and ultimately premature mortality. Much of modern medicine, for example organ transplantation, bowel surgery and some cancer treatments may become unsafe due to the risk of infection. In addition, influenza pandemics would become more serious without effective treatments.”

It adds: “The number of infections complicated by AMR are expected to increase markedly over the next 20 years. If a widespread outbreak were to occur, we could expect around 200,000 people to be affected by a bacterial blood infection that could not be treated effectively with existing drugs, and around 80,000 of these might die.

“High numbers of deaths could also be expected from other forms of antimicrobial resistant infection.”

Already, there are no longer any effective drugs against one strain of E.coli, a bacterial infection that can prove lethal.

Analysts have also looked at the potential casualties from an increasing drug resistance in Klebsiella pneumonia, a form of bacterial pneumonia, and Staphylococcus aureus, a skin infection, as well as HIV, tuberculosis and malaria.

Read more » The Telegraph
See more » http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/11517558/British-superbug-outbreak-could-kill-80000.html

TED 2015: Bill Gates warns on future disease epidemic

The world needs to prepare for the next major health crisis, Bill Gates has told delegates at the Ted (Technology, Entertainment and Design) conference.

While Ebola seems to be being kept under control currently, next time “we may not be so lucky” the Microsoft co-founder warned.

He said that there were plenty of technology tools that could be used to contain the spread of a virus.

And, he added, governments should learn from how nations prepare for war.

“Nato plays war games to check that people are well-trained and prepared. Now we need germ games,” he said.

He also called for a reserve “medical corps” similar to the reserve armies that civilians can join.

Technology can play a big role in helping prevent the spread of a virus, he told the Ted audience.

The proliferation of mobile phones mean that citizens can easily report where disease breaks out and satellite mapping can quickly collate where the problem areas are.

Meanwhile advances in biology have drastically cut the time it takes to develop vaccines for new viruses

During the Ebola crisis, technology firms such as IBM contributed tracking systems that allowed the authorities to create detailed maps of outbreaks based on text messages from citizens.

Continue reading TED 2015: Bill Gates warns on future disease epidemic

Titanium jaw created by Israeli dental tech firm on Israeli-developed 3D printer

By BY DAVID SHAMAH

Over the past several years, Israeli hospitals have treated hundreds of victims of the Syrian civil war, but a procedure conducted on a Syrian patient last week at Rambam Hospital in Haifa was easily the most ambitious the institution has ever attempted, according to the hospital

The patient, who sustained severe injuries as a result of fighting on the Syrian side of the Golan border, was brought by the Israeli army to the hospital for treatment. The patient’s lower jaw was completely destroyed as the result of a bullet wound. The man, in critical condition, was unable to eat or to even speak.

Continue reading Titanium jaw created by Israeli dental tech firm on Israeli-developed 3D printer

Home Remedies for Yeast Infection

A yeast infection, also known as Candida, is basically caused by a group of microscopic fungi or yeast called Candida albicans. It generally affects the vaginal area but can also develop around dentures, under the breasts, lower abdomen, nail beds, and beneath skin folds.

Factors that can increase the risk of getting a yeast infection are pregnancy, stress, chronic health conditions, diabetes, use of oral contraceptives, steroids and antibiotics.

Women can also get yeast infections after menopause due to declining estrogen levels, which thin the vaginal walls. Most men and women suffer from a yeast infection at least once.

Some of the signs of a yeast infection are itching, burning or swelling in and around the affected area. If it is a vaginal yeast infection, there will be pain or discomfort in the vagina during sex, a burning feeling when urinating, and odorless vaginal discharge. There are many simple home remedies that can eliminate the infection in a relatively short time.

Continue reading Home Remedies for Yeast Infection

Powerful Syrup For Melting Kidney Stones

Anyone who has had problems with kidney stones knows that it one hell of a painful condition, especially if the stone is stuck in the urinary tract, channel leading from the kidney to the bladder.

Even when it is in the bladder, the stone must first pass through the urinary tract. Since men have longer urinary channel, they have a bigger problem with this health condition.

What are kidney stones?

Kidney stones are mineral deposits – usually some form of calcium, such as calcium oxalate – deposited in the kidneys, which form small sand-like stones inside the kidneys.

The stone may remain in the kidney for weeks, months or even years without causing any symptoms. However, if it moves, it may cause big pain in the back, hips and bloody, muddy urine.

In such a situation, it is advisable to drink huge amount of liquid to allow the stone to be kicked out by urinating and take some analgesics in order to relief the pain. But if the stone is too large, it may require surgery for its removal.

There is another option which combines plenty of fluids in order for the stone to be suppressed. We are going to explain this option in the article, below, in order to break the stone and to eject it out of the body.

Continue reading Powerful Syrup For Melting Kidney Stones

Ebola Vaccine, Ready for Test, Sat on the Shelf

By

GALVESTON, Tex. — Almost a decade ago, scientists from Canada and the United States reported that they had created a vaccine that was 100 percent effective in protecting monkeys against the Ebola virus. The results werepublished in a respected journal, and health officials called them exciting. The researchers said tests in people might start within two years, and a product could potentially be ready for licensing by 2010 or 2011.

It never happened. The vaccine sat on a shelf. Only now is it undergoing the most basic safety tests in humans — with nearly 5,000 people dead from Ebola and an epidemic raging out of control in West Africa.

Its development stalled in part because Ebola is rare, and until now, outbreaks had infected only a few hundred people at a time. But experts also acknowledge that the absence of follow-up on such a promising candidate reflects a broader failure to produce medicines and vaccines for diseases that afflict poor countries. Most drug companies have resisted spending the enormous sums needed to develop products useful mostly to countries with little ability to pay.

Read more » The New York Times

 

Meet Dr Adib Rizvi – The man who brought free healthcare to Sindh’s poor

Pakistan’s ‘miracle’ doctor inspired by NHS

Pakistan’s shambolic public health system suffers from corruption, mismanagement and lack of resources. But one public sector hospital in Karachi provides free specialised healthcare to millions, led by a man whose dream was inspired by the UK’s National Health Service.

Dr Adib Rizvi’s most distinguishing feature is not just his grey hair. You can spot him in a crowd of people in a cramped hospital corridor by the respect he commands among patients and staff.

It doesn’t only come from being the founder and the head of one of Pakistan’s largest public health organisations.

Quite the opposite, for a man who’s spearheaded a life-long mission of providing “free public health care with dignity,” Dr Rizvi is unassuming as he walks around the hospital wards checking on his patients.

Continue reading Meet Dr Adib Rizvi – The man who brought free healthcare to Sindh’s poor

Why Ebola is so dangerous

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the world’s deadliest to date and the World Health Organization has declared an international health emergency as more than 3,850 people have died of the virus in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria this year.

What is Ebola?

Ebola is a viral illness of which the initial symptoms can include a sudden fever, intense weakness, muscle pain and a sore throat, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). And that is just the beginning: subsequent stages are vomiting, diarrhoea and – in some cases – both internal and external bleeding.

The disease infects humans through close contact with infected animals, including chimpanzees, fruit bats and forest antelope.

It then spreads between humans by direct contact with infected blood, bodily fluids or organs, or indirectly through contact with contaminated environments. Even funerals of Ebola victims can be a risk, if mourners have direct contact with the body of the deceased.

Read more » BBC
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-26835233

The best way to help your body protect itself against Ebola

The best way to help your body protect itself against Ebola (or any virus or bacteria)

(NaturalNews) With the threat of the Ebola virus spreading, there is a need to understand what natural options are readily available to you in case you don’t want to be subjected to conventional medical treatments and infected patients in hospitals. The only proven system to help eradicate the Ebola virus is your body’s immune system, and it is of primary importance to start strengthening its response now to give yourself the best chance of successfully fighting off an infection.

Work with your body’s natural defenses

The only way to work with your body’s natural defenses is to give it what it requires in order to function at optimal performance. Conventional medical wisdom claims that man-made remedies such as vaccines are superior to those provided by nature, but it doesn’t take a scientist to understand that the toxic chemicals and preservatives injected into the body along with antigens is not a legitimate way to improve immunity.

To improve your immunity, you must improve your relationship with nature and the medicine it provides, which has been proven to keep people healthy for thousands of years. In this case, a focus on healing foods and herbs that have strong antibacterial and antiviral properties is of primary importance, along with improving immune system function and eliminating foods that suppress it.

Antibacterial foods, herbs, and solutions to begin consuming regularly

Even though Ebola is a virus, it only makes sense to start clearing out any harmful bacteria in your digestive system in order for your immune system to function properly. This will allow it to do its job more efficiently, which is a must have when dealing with more deadly infections such as Ebola.

Antibacterial foods and herbs to consider, include: Garlic, Onion, Turmeric (curcumin), Ginger, Lemon, Cayenne, Peppermint, Cinnamon, Clove, Cranberry, Calendula, Echinacea, Oregon grape root ….

Read more » Natural News

HOW BILL GATES HAS BEEN QUIETLY TRYING TO TRANSFORM GLOBAL HEALTH

You’re probably lucky. You probably don’t have to worry about how clean your water is, if you’ll be able to get vaccinated this year, or if you’ll ever get to see a doctor. You’re lucky, but much of the world isn’t. Many parts of the globe still lack the infrastructure and resources to get on par with modern health care. Bill Gates – Microsoft monolith turned philanthropist – wants to change that.

Ten years ago, Bill and his wife Melinda Gates launched the Grand Challenges in Global Health initiative. Initially bolstered by 450 million dollars from their nonprofit foundation, this initiative was set up to give a monetary incentive for scientists and researchers to pursue radical or transformative ideas in public health.

“That’s the idea behind Grand Challenges—to focus bright scientists on the problems of the poorest, take some risks, and deliver results,” Gates said in a press release.

Since 2005, the Grand Challenges in Global Health grant program has delivered 458 million dollars to researchers from 33 countries. And these grants have been focused on issues the Gates Foundation believes to be fundamental in bringing the rest of the world up to the medical standard. Of the 16 overarching challenges listed by the foundation, many focus on vaccination — one of if not the most cost effective disease prevention program we have. Grants have been awarded for projects trying to develop needless delivery systems, vaccine formulas that do not require refrigeration, and single-dose vaccines for use shortly after birth.

Read more » Nerdist
http://www.nerdist.com/2014/10/how-bill-gates-has-been-quietly-trying-to-transform-global-health/

The distinctive morality of ebola

Ebola does not really hide. It is transmitted by the obviously sick and the dead. Moreover if transmission stopped tomorrow, it would disappear completely within a couple of months. In so far as it is cryptic at all it is because of a short asymptomatic incubation period and early symptoms that can be mistaken for other diseases.

As the experts have said repeatedly, it is a disease we know how to control by contract tracing and isolation of symptomatic individuals. The fact that the recent outbreak has run out of control comes down to moral decisions and in fact its spread involves moral decisions at nearly every step. It is also in an important sense black and white. There is no accommodation possible. Ebola needs to be controlled or it will just grow and grow until it overwhelms those trying to fight it and then the rest of us.

Read more » http://paintmychromosomes.blogspot.ca/2014/10/the-distinctive-morality-of-ebola_13.html

Ebola reaches Europe for the first time: Spanish nurse tests positive for virus after treating African patient

By Jorge Sainz, Associated Press

MADRID, Spain — In what is the first reported incident of Ebola transmission outside Africa, a Spanish nurse who treated a missionary for the disease at a Madrid hospital tested positive for the disease, Spain’s health minister said Monday.

The female nurse was part of the medical team that treated a 69-year-old Spanish priest who died in a hospital last month after being flown back from Sierra Leone, where he was posted, Health Minister Ana Mato said.

The woman went to the Alcorcon hospital in the Madrid suburbs with a fever and was placed in isolation. Mato said the infection was confirmed by two tests and that the nurse was admitted to a hospital on Sunday.

Read more » National Post
http://news.nationalpost.com/2014/10/06/ebola-reaches-europe-for-the-first-time-spanish-nurse-tests-virus-after-treating-africa-patient/