Category Archives: Sindhi

Hashoo Kewal Ramanni

“I have bond and love with people of my land (Sindh) who will reclaim me one day. Bharat’s leaders also reclaim their Liaqat who has sent me in exile. Leaders exported from Bharat are telling me this land doesn’t belong to me. It is now Pakistan.”
~ Hashoo Kewal Ramanni

Note: Above quote of Hashoo Kewal Ramanni is adopted from Social meida (Facebook).

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‘A Complaint’

Poetry by Hassan Dars

Translated from Sindhi by Mohammed Hanif and Gobind Menghwar.

You do not have the time
To feel with your own hands
The sharp edge of history’s sword
You curse love itself,
You mock it
You do not even know
The love they give you
You don’t know the assassins’ intent
You haven’t met their new generations
Their daggers’ thirst
Unquenchable
I swear by the martyrs of Makli
Time is the lost ring of an unknown soldier
That can fit around the finger of any thief
Now you are walking into the circus with them!
Our rope is broken midway
We have fallen into the open jaws of crocodiles.
While we lie here buried deep in our defeat
You are in the midst of their victory feast!
I wish you’d remember your land
I wish you’d remember your country
Your street

Sindhi turns out to be second language of Pakistan

Sindhi 2Sindhi remains the second-most widely spoken language in Pakistan, according to MoveHub, a website for people looking to move abroad.

To facilitate people thinking of moving abroad, the website has come up with a map of the world where the names of countries are replaced with their ‘second languages’. While in most cases this shows the effects of colonialism and cultural imperialism, in the case of Pakistan, it reflects post-independence policymaking.

Sindhi is a regional language spoken which is not widely spoken outside of Sindh province, somewhat similar to Punjabi – the first language – which is mostly used in Punjab province.

Incidentally, Pakistan is one of the few countries where the official language is not the first or even the second language. The official language is Urdu.

Pakistan’s regional languages face looming extinction

An Indo-Aryan language, Sindhi is spoken in both India and Pakistan, with some 75 million native speakers around the world. It is the official language of Sindh province of Pakistan and is recognised by India as one of its scheduled languages.

Read more » The Express Tribune
See more >> https://tribune.com.pk/story/1324502/sindhi-turns-second-language-pakistan/

International Conference on Moenjodaro and Indus Valley Civilisation’

LARKANO: Archaeolo­gists from the Unites States, United Kingdom, France, Spain, Japan and Italy attending the three-day ‘International Conference on Moenjodaro and Indus Valley Civilisation’ at the ancient site read out their research papers on the second day on Friday.

The papers focused on technical aspects dealing with the discoveries made and research carried out hitherto, measures undertaken so far to protect and preserve the site for posterity, mid-term plans for the site’s preservation, promotion of tourism, the Indus script discovered so far, seals’ carving techniques etc.

Dr Ayumu Konasukawa, an archaeologist from Japan, presented his paper on ‘Chronological change and continuity of seal carving techniques from the early Harappan to the Harappan periods in the Ghaggar basin’. According to his research, the data for analyses comprises fired steatite seals discovered at Kunal, Banawali and Farmana. Through scanning electron microscope and 3D analysis, it has become evident that the seals found in the basin during the said periods are characterised in various carving techniques. Although the seals have a lot of difference in terms of manufacturing technique and design, such as the motif of the surface, they also have commonality as regards a part of carving techniques.

Read more » DAWN
See more >> http://www.dawn.com/news/1314054

INDUS SCRIPT FONT

indus-script-font
Photo credits: Shabir Kumbhar

The Indus signs have been under constant analysis and study. These have been subjected to various examinations where these were identified as primary and composite signs.

Asko Parpola has made a continuing contribution to research on the Indus writing system. He collected and critically edited the Indus signs as he attempted at structural analysis. His objectives were to find out the number of graphemes, and the word length. His search for primary signs and identifying composite signs resulted in preparation of the sign list of the Indus script, with principle graphic variants, each with one reference.

The Indus signs have been largely used as drawing images in computational analysis and studies. Present effort is to create the Indus signs in Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) based font for installing in computers.

National fund for Mohenjodaro has developed this font for installing on computers and embedding on websites by researchers and users around the world. This font is developed by Mr. Shabir Kumbhar, engineering / embedded and mapping by Mr. Amar Fayaz Buriro with the consultation of Dr. Kaleemullah Lashari.

Indus Script font is available to be downloaded for further studies, computational exercises and statistical analysis, free of charge; the only encumbrance is that user acknowledge our website.

Read more >> Mohen Jo Daro Online
See more >> https://www.mohenjodaroonline.net/index.php/indus-script/corpus-by-asko-parpola

Dialects of Sindhi language

These are the major dialects of Sindhi Language. The language is the same but their is a slight difference in words or way of speaking. Their are several other dialects of Sindhi language too (like Memoni) but they are not spoken by a big population.

Futher information about the Dialects:

1. Laasi – It is spoken by around 1 million people in Parts of Lasbela, Balochistan and Sindh.

2. Larri – It is spoken by over 2 million people, in Thatto, Sujawal and Tando.

3. Kutchhi, it is spoken by around 2 million people in Pakistan and 2 million in India too. Their is a hug Kutchhi population in Karachi, Sindh. The language bears more grammatical similarity with Sindhi and lexical similarity with Gujarati.

4. Thari or Thareli or (Ddaaddki): it is language of the people of Thar. Spoken on both side of border by over 6-7 million. It is a bit influenced by Rajasthani languages.

5. Vicholi: It is spoken by a huge population of Sindhis. It is spoken mostly in Hyderabad region. Over 11 million people speak this dialect.

6. Siroli: It is spoken by a large Number of people in Upper Sindh, Larkano and Sukkur region, but also in parts of Balochistan and RahimYarKhan (Punjab). It is influenced by Seraiki. It is spoke by over 11 million people. In Balochistan it is known as Firaqi Sindhi, with around 1 million speakers.

* In Karachi the situation is different and Sindhi is more influenced by Urdu, and all dialects mix up. While in rural Karachi people usually speak Laasi or Larri. The total number of Sindhi speakers worldwide is impossible to know as Census of Pakistan and India are politically influenced. According to famous Pakistani demographers the population of Sindh is usually 15-20% shown lesser than it actually is. The total number of Sindhis worldwide is over 40 million, out of which 80% live in Sindh, Pakistan. All the Memon’s and even those that came in 1947 are actually Sindhis by ancestry, their origin is from Thatto. Sindhis in India make up around 6-7 million of the population and while Sindhis in other countries make up around 1.5 million to 2 million, out of which 60% are Indian, and remaining Pakistani Diaspora, but the Pakistani Sindhi diaspora is growing at a faster rate*

Courtesy: Source of above material: Explore the Beauty of Sindh

– – – – –

Other than that there are some more branches of the Dialects of Sindhi language

1- Lahinda لهندا معنا اولهندي واري زبان
2- Saraiki/ Jatki سرائڪي يا جتڪي
3- Kaytranni ڪيتراڻي جا لهندا سان مشابهت رکي ٿي
4- Ubhee اُڀي
5- Thareli/ ddaddki ٿريلي يا ڍاڍڪي
6- Mokakee موڪاڪي
7- Lorree chienee لوڙي چيني
8- Jadghhalee جدغالي
Reference: Janat-ul-Sindh book ريفرينس جنت السنڌ ڪتاب
Source: https://iaob.wordpress.com/2016/05/02/dialects-of-sindhi-language/

Sindh: German philologist Ernest Trump gets Latif Award 150 years after compiling Shah jo Risalo

trumpp
Ernest Trump

HYDERABAD: For the first time since the inception of the country, the Sindh culture department has posthumously honoured with Latif Award, German philologist Ernest Trumpp who was the first to compile Shah jo Risalo in 1866 and write a book on Sindhi grammar.

Sindh Minister for Food Nisar Ahmed Khuhro, who gave away awards to writers, artists and others for best performance in their respective fields on the third day of the 273rd Urs celebrations of great [Secular] Sufi poet Shah Abdul Latif Bhitai at Cultural Centre in Bhitshah on Friday, said that Sindh Minister for Culture Syed Sardar Ali Shah would travel to Germany to present the award to the late scholar’s family.

Ernest Trumpp, a German philologist (March 13, 1828 –April 5, 1885), was sent to pre-partitioned India in 1854 as a missionary by the Ecclesiastical Mission Society to study languages of India and prepare their grammars for use by Christian missionaries. He authored during his stay in India the first book on Sindhi grammar and compiled Shah Jo Risalo in 1866 A.D. Trumpp named his compilation Diwan when he edited and had it published in Leipzig, Germany.

Sindh Minister for Culture Syed Sardar Ali Shah said that either he would travel to Germany or the late scholar’s family would be invited to Sindh after the German consulate traced them.

“Trumpp compiled the poetry and took it to Germany with him where he got it published. He then brought it back in book form to Sindh. The original Shah jo Risalo is preserved at the Cultural Centre in Bhitshah,” he said.

The minister said that he would meet German consul general to decide the modalities of the visit. In fact, he said, German consul general was to attend the 273rd Urs celebrations but he did not get security clearance on account of Shah Noorani terrorist incident. The naming of Excellence Centre in Bhitshah after H.T. Sorley was a tribute to the scholar’s service as Bhita’s was interpreter, he said.

Read more >> DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1297219/german-philologist-gets-latif-award-150-years-after-compiling-shah-jo-risalo

Joggi thee maan murliyoon wajjayaan – by Swami Anand Krishna

Joggi thee maan murliyoon wajjayaan,
جوڳي ٿي مان مُرليون وڄايان
Ggoliyaan pahinjay Punhal khhy.
ڳوليان پنهنجي پنهل کي
Saami thee maan murliyoon wajjayaan,
سامي ٿي مان مُرليون وڄايان
Ggoliyaan pahinjay Punhal khhy.
ڳوليان پنهنجي پنهل کي
Punhal aahay hin des mein,
پنهل آهي هن ديس ۾
Ggoliyaan payie pardes mein.
ڳوليان پئي پرديس ۾
Sukal wann saawa thiyaa,
سڪل وڻ ساوا ٿيا
Aayaa baadal wo Allah.
آيا بادل وو الله
by Swami Anand Krishna
سوامي آنند ڪرشنا

Courtesy: Sawami Anand Krishna

Sindhi Hindus in Gujarat

By Khaled Ahmed

Hindus were driven out of Sindh after 1947. They went to the neighbouring Indian state of Gujarat but were not accepted there by the local Hindu communities. Shockingly, these very Hindus, partly to be accepted as true Hindus, participated in the anti-Muslim violence in Godhra in Gujarat in 2002.

These facts have been revealed in the book Interpreting the Sindhi World: Essays on society and history; Edited by Michel Boivin & Matthew Cook (Oxford University Press, 2010). Like East Pakistan, nationalism in Sindh was language-based. The province was pluralist, just like East Pakistan. Hindus and Muslims lived in peace. Richard Burton wrote: “Hindu religion is not to be found in a state of purity in Sindh. Hinduism here is mixed up with the heterogeneous elements of Islam, and the faith of Nanak Shah. A Hindu will often become the murid (follower) of a Mussulman, and in some cases the contrary takes place… all great Pirs revered by the Moslems have classical Hindu names” (p.17).

The Supreme Court of India, in 2004, fined a litigant for asking to delete Sindh from the Indian national anthem, thus challenging any organic relationship between territory and nationalism (p.31).

The modern state of Gujarat consists of a strip of ‘mainland’ Gujarat, the peninsula of Saurashtra, and the western arm of Kutch (p.33). Later, Junagadh was also added. The Hindus of Sindh mostly moved to this state after Partition. They left en masse in 1948, after the immigrating populations touched off riots in Karachi.

Rita Kothari records the Hindu migration into Gujarat. Ships from Karachi arrived at the ports of Porbander, Veraval, and Okha on Gujarat’s coast. Movement towards Gujarat also happened indirectly, especially via Rajasthan, when Sindhis arrived from Mirpurkhas (p.58). These Sindhis looked ‘Muslim-like’ to the locals: “The Hindus of Sindh were not quite the most suitable examples of orthodox Hindus, as they were a meat-eating community in a largely vegetarian region” (p.59).

Read more » The Express Tribune
See more » http://tribune.com.pk/story/128170/sindhi-hindus-in-gujarat/

Remembering Sundri Uttamchandani

sundriSundri Uttamchandani ( 28th Sep 1924-8th July 2013), was born in Hyderabd Sindh was the left to center progressive person, short story writer and novelist of Sindhi language in India. She had been writing continuously for last 4 decades. She had won Sahitya Akdemi Award and Maharashtra Gaurav Purskar and Akhil Bharat Sindhi Bboli. She had remained active in the movement for recognition of Sindhi language, and other literary and cultural causes of the Sindhi community. Some of her short stories and novels have been translated in various languages of India. Her writings are liked by common people especially because of her homely language complied with proverbs. She was a Radio, TV and stage artist. She had also written act plays and poems. She was the founder President of women’s organisation, “Sindhu Nari Sabha” since 1966. She was the  Mother of Asha Chand.

Read more about Sundri Uttamchandani at » Sindhi Wikipedia.

Courtesy: via Social media.

US lawmaker accuses Pakistan of ruling through jihadist extremism

WASHINGTON: Alleging that Pakistan is using jihadist extremism to administer and is bent upon extinguishing other cultures in the country, a top US lawmaker has warned Islamabad that it might be headed for 1971 like partition soon if it continues to do so.

“Those who think that they can keep Pakistan together by attacking and extinguishing other cultures with jihadist extremism should go visit Dhaka,” Congressman Brad Sherman, ranking member of the House Foreign Affairs Sub-Committee on Asia and the Pacific said at an event of Sindhi Foundation, Washington.

More » The Economic Times
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/international/world-news/us-lawmaker-accuses-pakistan-of-ruling-through-jihadist-extremism/articleshow/54516863.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest

The forgotten utopia: The Indus people may have lived for 700 years without war, weapons or inequality

The Indus civilisation lived across South Asia from 2600-1900 BC
Artefacts, such as jewellery, have been found, but not a single weapon
There is little evidence of a government, royalty or any other leader
Some experts have said it is impossible for Indus to have lived in this way
But until the Indus scripture has been translated, it is difficult to know

By SHIVALI BEST FOR MAILONLINE

Many believe the idea of a utopian society is an impossible fantasy.

But there may have been one mysterious, ancient group of people that was able to fulfil the dream of life without conflict or rulers.

Remains of the Indus civilisation, which flourished from 2600 to 1900 BC, show no clear signs of weapons, war or inequality.

This is according to Andrew Robinson. the author of ‘The Indus: Lost civilisations’, who has written an in-depth piece in the New Scientist.

‘All signs point to a prosperous and advanced society – one of history’s greatest,’ he writes.

The Indus Empire stretched over more than a million square miles across the plains of the Indus River from the Arabian Sea to the Ganges, over what is now Pakistan, northwest India and eastern Afghanistan.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3791308/The-forgotten-utopia-Indus-people-lived-700-years-without-war-weapons-inequality.html#ixzz4KQArUPmt
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Easter Island – Indus Valley Scripts

Amazing similarities between two distinct cultures separated by thousands of miles!

indus script

Rongorongo is Oceania’s only indigenous script. It is found in one location only – In the centre of the Pacific Ocean, over a thousand miles from any continent. We now know that the first migrations to Easter Island were deliberate, because they involved taking the people, plants and animals needed to establish sustainable colonies(6). The script was first identified in 1864, and any suggestions that it originated after European contact are  rejected on the basis that at least two of the Rongorongo tablets are dated to before their arrival(1). So the big question remains… where did it come from?

Read more » Ancient Wisdom
See more » http://www.ancient-wisdom.com/easterislandindusvalley1.htm

Sur Saamoondi

Translation and Transcription by Emily Hauze

لاهيان جي نه چِتان، الا! اُن مَ وِسران
مَڙهيو مَنجهارن، جيءُ منهنجو جن سين
شاهه عبدالطيف ڀٽائي

In romanized Sindhi:

Laahiyaan jay na chitaan, alla! un ma wisraan,
Marrhiyo manjharan, jeeu muhinjo jin seen.
~ Secular Sindhi Soofi poet Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai (1689 – 1752)
Sur Saamoondi

“O Heavens! His heart and mine from within are entwined;
Let me abide in his mind; if forgotten, I die.”

—-
Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai: from “Sur Samoondi”
in my translation.
—-

An explanation for those who do not know the context: “Sur Samundi” is the chapter in which Shah Latif writes from the perspective of young women whose husbands are sailors. They wait in anxiety, love, and hope, while their men are at sea, and they pray to be reunited. For Shah Latif, reunion with the husband equates to reunion with the Beloved (God), for which the Sufi soul is eternally longing.

Courtesy: Emily Hauze + Social media
https://www.facebook.com/emily.hauze/media_set?set=a.10206112358000488.1073741949.1608960197&type=3

Sindhi Soofi Mehfil at Baali, Indonesia – by Swami Anand Krishna

Muhinjo daaroo dawa tuhinjo deedaar aa;
منهنجو دارو دوا تنهنجو ديدار آ
A glimpse of Yours, O beloved is the medicine and wine that can cure me;
Ddekhhaarann Tabeeban khhy bekaar aa;
ڏيکارڻ طبيبن کي بيڪار آ
There is no use to seek the advice of doctors;
Duwaa kaan theendi muhinjay dard jee;
دوا ڪا نه ٿيندي منهنجي درد جي
No medicine can possibly cure my illness;
Hakiman khhy kahirree Khabar marz jee;
حڪيمن کي ڪهڙي خبر مرض جي
What the doctors know about my illness;
Ta kahirray marz jee beemaari aa;
ته ڪهڙي مرض جي بيماري آ
How will doctors know about my pain (illness);
Chariyo thee nachaan tho tuhinjay dar aggiyaan;
چريو ٿي نچان ٿو تنهنجي در اڳيان
Like a mad person, I dance infornt of your door;
Patang jiyaan pachaan tho tuhinjay dil aggiyaan;
پتنگ جيان پچان ٿو تنهنجي دل اڳيان
Like a moth, I burn infront the falme of your heart;
Chhini toon ta chhin, moonkhhay chhijjnno na aa;
ڇني تون ته ڇن، مونکي ڇڄڻو نه آ
Even if you break with me, I shall never ever break you;
Wajjaai kaa tuo ahirri dhankaar aa;
وڄائي ڪا تو اهڙي ڌنڪار آ
How melodious is your song and flute;
Paray tokhha dilbar jay rahanno na aa!
پَري توکان دلبر جي رهڻو نه آ
What ever happens, I am not going  to stay far from you, O my beloved!
Thiyul zindagaani jo ikraar aa;
ٿيل زندگاني جو اقرار آ
I am committed to you for this entire life.

Courtesy: Anand Ashram Foundation + youtube

Unforgettable Sindhi songs – Amar Geet – Toon Yaad Wari Aaein – Singer Sonia Kawal

Tribute to Shamsher-ul-Hydri and Original Singer was Mahjbeen Kazekbash. Visit http://sindhimusic.com/ for more videos. AA Production (MAKA Production) presents (Amar Geet Vol-1) the collection of unforgettable Sindhi songs.

Courtesy: AA Production (MAKA Production)

Watayo Faqeer

Watayo Faqeer (وتايو فقير) is a Sindhi folk stories character. On a very cold night his mother mother said: “Wataya you are close to God. It’s very cold tonight, can’t you ask God to spare a little bit of fire from hell to keep poor people like us warm here?”

Watayo said: “Mother, there is no fire in hell. Everyone has to bring his own.”

For 35 years, Sindhi volunteers have helped worshippers at a Chennai mosque break their Ramzan fast

The followers of the Sufi saint Dada Ratanchand carry on the tradition of serving food at the Wallajah Mosque for all thirty days of the fast.

It’s dusk in Chennai. The warm evening light streams in from behind the two white minarets of the Wallajah mosque in Triplicane. In the spacious front yard, more than 50 men wearing white fez caps wait silently. A little before the evening prayers begin in the 220-year-old mosque, a yellow truck swings into the driveway. The men immediately spin into action, unloading metal containers of porridge, biscuits, bananas and vadas.

As they have done for the past 35 years, Sindhi volunteers from the Sufidar Trust – who follow the teachings of Dada Ratanchand, a Partition refugee who settled in Chennai – have gathered to serve iftaar, the meal that ends the daily fast during the month of Ramzan.

The trust aims to spread the teachings of the Sufi saint Shahenshah Baba Nebhraj Sahib of Rohri, Sindh. “We believe all Gods are one, only people have turned it into different sects,” said Govind Bharwani, who has been a volunteer with the Trust almost since its inception. “That is what our guruji told us.”

Read more » Scroll.in
See more » http://scroll.in/article/811273/for-35-years-sindhi-volunteers-have-helped-worshippers-at-a-chennai-mosque-break-their-ramzan-fast

Indo-Canadian Singer Lends Vocals to Sultans of String’s Sindhi Folk Song: Watch

Indo-Canadian songstress Shweta Subram recently collaborated with Juno Award-winning instrumental group Sultans of String and sitarist Anwar Khurshid on a traditional Sindhi folk song, titled “Parchan Shaal Panhwar,” according to a press release.

A fusion of East meets West, “Parchan Shaal Panhwar” is a Sindhi metaphor that translates to “A Personal Struggle for Freedom.” Subram’s soulful voice wonderfully complements the melodic sounds of the Sultans of String, who are known for combining elements of Spanish flamenco, Arabic folk, Cuban rhythms and French manouche gypsy jazz. The music video was released May 3.

Chris McKhool, bandleader and violinist of the Toronto-based Sultans of String, contacted Subram after he came across her successful collaboration with the The Piano Guys on their hit “Don’t You Worry Child (Khushnuma).” This upbeat fusion has now crossed over 15 million views online.

“We were very excited when Shweta agreed to lend her vocals to the album. We were looking for a voice that is rustic yet unique, and Shwetas’ vocal performance in this song is absolutely stunning!” exclaimed McKhool in a press release.

Watch the music video for the “Parchan Shaal Panhwar” song featuring Shweta Subram:

Read more » India West
See more » http://www.indiawest.com/entertainment/global/indo-canadian-singer-lends-vocals-to-sultans-of-string-s/article_684f5d12-3cc3-11e6-84f0-27955cf47a11.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=user-share

A Tribute to the most Sacred River Indus (Sindhu)

A Tribute to the most Sacred River Sindhu , the real source of life for the inhabitants of Indus Valley !

Many poets have praised the mighty Sindhu Nadi in different expressions. Goverdhan Bharati has described Sindhu in her different moods. His imagination and the music composition of C Arjun with Anila Sunder’s colorful performance brings Sindhu alive.
Sung by Teji Bhojwani. In vedas Sindhu has been mentioned many a times.

Courtesy: Sindhi Sangat

Movie on Ancient Indus Civilization, Mohenjo Daro | Official Trailer | Hrithik Roshan & Pooja Hegde

UTV Motion Pictures and Ashutosh Gowariker Productions Present Mohenjo Daro starring Hrithik Roshan and Pooja Hegde The film is directed by Ashutosh Gowariker and releases on August 12, 2016.

Courtesy: UTV Motion