Tag Archives: Sindhi

UN declaration of rights now available in Sindhi language

A Pakistani student at Cornell University has translated the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Sindhi language. The full text and audio versions of the Sindhi translation is now available on the United Nations website.

When the UN High Commissioner for Human Right’s 10-year project #Standup4humanrights was initiated in December 2017, Sindhi language was not included in the list of languages in which the declaration was to be promoted across the globe, primarily because there was no proper translation of the Universal Declaration in Sindhi Language.

Read more >> Daily Times
https://dailytimes.com.pk/204567/un-declaration-rights-now-available-sindhi-language/

The forgotten utopia: The Indus people may have lived for 700 years without war, weapons or inequality

The Indus civilisation lived across South Asia from 2600-1900 BC
Artefacts, such as jewellery, have been found, but not a single weapon
There is little evidence of a government, royalty or any other leader
Some experts have said it is impossible for Indus to have lived in this way
But until the Indus scripture has been translated, it is difficult to know

By SHIVALI BEST FOR MAILONLINE

Many believe the idea of a utopian society is an impossible fantasy.

But there may have been one mysterious, ancient group of people that was able to fulfil the dream of life without conflict or rulers.

Remains of the Indus civilisation, which flourished from 2600 to 1900 BC, show no clear signs of weapons, war or inequality.

This is according to Andrew Robinson. the author of ‘The Indus: Lost civilisations’, who has written an in-depth piece in the New Scientist.

‘All signs point to a prosperous and advanced society – one of history’s greatest,’ he writes.

The Indus Empire stretched over more than a million square miles across the plains of the Indus River from the Arabian Sea to the Ganges, over what is now Pakistan, northwest India and eastern Afghanistan.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3791308/The-forgotten-utopia-Indus-people-lived-700-years-without-war-weapons-inequality.html#ixzz4KQArUPmt
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Rajiv Malhotra Discussing the new MOHENJO DARO movie

Rajiv Malhotra Discussing the new MOHENJO DARO movie, what is true and false about its depictions of history. What are the social-political implications. How to watch it for entertainment as well as education. Please watch my talk to develop a Vedic drishti for interpreting this movie.

Courtesy: Rajiv Malhotra >> Youtube

Indus Valley Civilisation much older than thought: report

KOLKATA: It may be time to rewrite history textbooks. Scientists from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kharagpur, and Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) have uncovered evidence that the Indus Valley Civilisation is at least 8,000 years old, and not just 5,500 years old. It took root well before the Egyptian (7,000 BC to 3,000 BC) and Mesopotamian (6,500 BC to 3,100 BC) civilisations. What’s more, the researchers have found evidence of a pre-Harappan civilisation that existed for at least 1,000 years before this.

The discovery, published in the prestigious Nature journal on May 25, may force a global rethink on the timelines of the so-called ‘cradles of civilisation’. The scientists believe they also know why the civilisation ended about 3,000 years ago: climate change.

“We have recovered perhaps the oldest pottery from the civilisation. We used a technique called ‘optically stimulated luminescence’ to date pottery shards of the Early Mature Harappan time to nearly 6,000 years ago and the cultural levels of pre-Harappan Hakra phase as far back as 8,000 years,” said Anindya Sarkar, head of the department of geology and geophysics at IIT-Kharagpur.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1261513

Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) gets a Sindhi chair, to launch certificate courses soon.

By PTI

NEW DELHI: The Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) has established a Sindhi chair for promotion of research in the language and will soon be offering certificate courses.
The varsity had earlier this week signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the National Council for Promotion of Sindhi Language (NCPSL) under the aegis of HRD Ministry to establish the Sindhi Chair at IGNOU headquarters in the capital.

Read more » The Economic Times
See more » http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/services/education/ignou-gets-a-sindhi-chair-to-launch-certificate-courses-soon/articleshow/49597797.cms

The “State Religion” is the root of religious terrorism and extremism in Pakistan.

WSC 27th International Conference
Desk News – London: 27th International Conference on Sindh, “Roots of Extremism and Terrorism in Pakistan and Human Rights of oppressed nations” was organized by the World Sindhi Congress (WSC), at Kingsley Hall, London, on October 31st, 2015..

Chairman Jeay Sindh Mahaz, Abdul Khalique Junejo’s book “Politics of Change – Bitter realities and tough choices” launched by World Sindhi Congress at London.  Amanullah Shaikh, thel leader of Awami Jhamori Party (AJP) and Julian Levesque French researcher spoke on the book. Farhan Kaghzi introduced the book and moderated the event.

India’s former Union Law Minister and formerer Chairman of Bar Council of India, Ram Jethmalani and .several other distinguished scholars and activists from Sindh, USA, EU, Canada and UK presented papers and speeches on the theme of “Roots of Extremism and Terrorism in Pakistan. Human Rights of oppressed nations”

Courtesy: via Social media (Facebook)

Gyan Hemnani talks about the idea of “Sindhhi Pradesh” in India.

Sindhi speaking people of India, migrated from the Sindh province of undivided India, after the partition on 14th August 1947.

The Sindh, gave the name Hind to the Nation. The archeological excavation of Mohan-Jo-Daro in Sindh, proved that Indus valley civilization was the oldest civilization of more than seven thousand years old, making India feel proud, among the community of World civilizations. But merely 67 years after partition, the same Sindh province has been forgotten completely. Most of the present Politicians and Administrators in Central government & the governments in provinces in the age group of 40-60 years, hear the word ‘SINDH’, only when the National Anthem is played on ceremonial occasions. They are therefore not aware of the betrayals, discriminations and injustices faced by Sindh and its people.
To put the issue of Sindhi Linguistic state in proper perspective, following historical facts are being introduced:-

Continue reading Gyan Hemnani talks about the idea of “Sindhhi Pradesh” in India.

Sindhis of Chile

Sindhis and Hindus in Chile

By Saaz Aggarwal, Hindustan Times, New Delhi

Punta Arenas, Chile, is one of the southern-most cities in the world. There was a time when every ship crossing from the Atlantic to the Pacific through the Straits of Magellan or around Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn) halted there.

Navigating giant waves, deadly currents, Antarctic blizzards and icebergs, the journeys took months. Arriving at Punta Arenas, the storm-battered, scurvy-ridden sailors would stumble out of their cramped quarters in relief. The town thrived.

We flew in more than a hundred years after the Panama Canal had changed things for Punta Arenas. At the Hotel Cabo de Hornos, we bumped into someone from our plane who had stayed over to catch his (once-a-week) flight to the Falkland Islands. Paul, from the South Atlantic Research Institute, told us that there was a post office nearby where Robert Scott, the early Antarctic explorer, had posted letters and packets.

These days too, this historic town is a base for Antarctic expeditions. The less adventurous can catch the tourist boat to a nearby island thickly populated by penguins. Punta Arenas, like much of Chile, nestles between wooded slopes on one side and a lavish seafront on the other. Like other Chilean cities, it has well-maintained public spaces that sport sculptures of different types: traditional European, contemporary and aboriginal. Its cemetery is said to be exceptionally beautiful and historic. We saw none of these, however, having come with the specific purpose of meeting the Sindhi families of this town.

I first saw the name Punta Arenas on a map in a book by the French scholar Claude Markovits, The Global World of Indian Merchants – 1750-1947: Traders of Sindh from Bukhara to Panama.

The map marks places around the world which had branches of trading firms headquartered in Hyderabad, Sindh, between 1890 and 1940. I felt surprised and impressed to see that it included about a dozen places in South America. How had Sindhis got so far away from home so long ago?

Invited to meals at the homes of the Sindhi families of Punta Arenas to be told their stories, it felt like I was eleven and invited to Harry Potter’s birthday party.

The first evening, Chile was playing arch-rival Bolivia in the Copa America, and I was learning how, one day in 1907, a Sindhi merchant, Harumal, came ashore. As the fascinating story proceeded, raucous cries rang out and vehicles revved loudly on the streets outside. Chile had won, 5-0.

The account of how Harumal opened his first store; how it got handed over to someone else; what happened during the First World War and then the Second; how Partition affected the Sindhis of Punta Arenas, will form part of Sindhi Tapestry, the ‘companion volume’ to my first book, Sind: Stories from a Vanished Homeland.

So far away from India, and with their home here for more than a hundred years, the Sindhis of Punta Arenas still speak Sindhi and eat Sindhi food. Like other diasporic Sindhis, they have an international network. Three household help I saw in the homes of these Chilean Sindhis were from, respectively, Nigeria, Indonesia and Burma.

The homes were lavish and decorated like those of fabled Oriental potentates, thick with curios and mirrors and objets d’art.

On Sunday morning, we attended satsang in the Hindu temple of Punta Arenas, which occupies prime real estate on the seafront. It was a moving service, conducted in both Sindhi and Spanish.

Like in other Sindhi mandars around the world, many world religions are represented here. It was once an essential characteristic of Sindh that spirituality and the inner life were revered beyond human classification. And then, it became an irony of history that the Hindus of Sind turned out to set such store by their own religion that they were forced into exile from a beloved homeland on account of it.

In 1947, these doughty people lost more than their homeland and their possessions. In their determination to move on and make the best of what they were left with, they lost their past too. In an extreme endorsement of this easily verified fact, someone in Punta Arenas told me, “I really learnt a lot today. I never even knew that Mohenjo Daro was
in Sindh!”

Yet another thing that suffered a blow was the Sindhi brand identity. In new lands, and with the urgency of feeding their families, trading was a way to make a respectable living. Competing as they were with cartels entrenched for decades, and obliged to trade on lower margins to get a foot in the door, they were branded early on as ‘cheats’.

The early resentment in Bombay produced Bollywood caricatures of wealthy and villainous businessmen speaking in thick Sindhi accents, and widespread aphorisms of the “If you meet a Sindhi and a snake, whom should you kill first?”

In 1947, when the Hindus of Sindh dispersed and sought new homes, many settled in Bombay. However, an early foundation had been established for the diaspora by the pioneering Sindhi entrepreneurial community, the Bhaibands, who had their kothis in the Shahibazar locality of Hyderabad, Sindh. As mapped by Markovits, they had branches all over the world, particularly dense in South East Asia and Africa, and even South America. This gave a base to the displaced ones. Families sent their young sons out to these outposts. They worked hard, deprived themselves, sent money home, and (some sooner than others) started their own businesses which, over the years, grew and grew. Often enough, they were displaced yet again by global politics and economics. In the 1950s, events in Vietnam sent them out to Thailand and Laos. In the 1960s, their stronghold in Indonesia loosened and Hong Kong opened up. In the early 1970s, Africa became hostile. The story went on.

It was something that happened in Chile in the mid-1970s that took today’s Sindhi population there. A government leaning to Communism was violently overthrown by the military dictator Augusto Pinochet. The new government began to nurture the Chilean economy with policies formulated by a group of young US-educated economists wryly referred to as the Chicago Boys. One of the initiatives was the Iquique free trade zone. In came the Sindhis.

Continue reading Sindhis of Chile

Databank of over 1,000 historical sites handed over to Sindh government

BY HANEEN RAFI

KARACHI: More than 1,000 historical sites in Sindh have been painstakingly documented and made part of an electronic database, which was handed over to the Sindh government at a ceremony on Tuesday.

The Heritage Foundation of Pakistan and the RWTH Aachen University of Germany have worked together for over three years to create this databank that focuses on establishing an authentic inventory of cultural sites in the province.

Detailed information of the 1,162 notified heritage sites of Sindh is part of a vast periphery of work that has been carried out in the province by local and international organisations. For architect Yasmin Lari, one of the project directors, “This database is about saving Sindh’s tangible heritage through management and safeguarding mechanisms.”

Though Sindh is one of the oldest civilisations, enjoying a legacy of Sufism and mysticism, folklore and oral histories, the cultural sites within it are in a state of neglect and are wearing out much faster than anticipated. This loss is not just of a tangible heritage, but also of an intangible one, which Ms Lari stresses should be halted.

Cultural sites in Badin, Dadu, Hyderabad, Ghotki, Jacobabad and Jamshoro are included in the databank. However, the most marked ones are the Moenjodaro and Makli sites, which are part of the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation’s world heritage list.

Dr Michael Jansen, the project director representing Aachen University, said: “The most important question is how to integrate the value of the jewels of Sindh into a strategic programme for further economic and social development.”

Continue reading Databank of over 1,000 historical sites handed over to Sindh government

Sindhi Language Authority (Sindhi Computing Deptt) presents – A dictionary of Print Technology

This dictionary was published in book form by Sindhi Language Authority, compiled by: Mr. Ameen Laghari. The basic motive of this dictionary is to deliver simple translation of Print Technology terms, day to day most used words and phrases as a helping tool to the Sindhi students of Mass Communications & Journalism.
Looking the importance of this helpful dictionary SLA has aimed to develop this App for students of Mass communications, journalism and also for professionals of related fields.
Main features:
• More than 4375 words, phrases and terms of Mass Communications.
• Simple and easy meaning of the words from English to Sindhi.
• Updated with current phrases of related technology
• Bookmarking and History of search facility for easily reach of recently checked words.
Technical Features:
• Quick search facility while you type.
• Developed on Updated programming and script.
• No need of internet, app will run offline after installation.
• App will not access your own personal data.
• Lightweight & user friendly
The dictionary is the helping tool of the students, teachers and communication related professionals in better understanding the phrases, words and traditional language of Mass Communications field.

Courtesy: Sindhi Language Authority
Read more » https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.sindhila.printtechnology

The Planned Disappearance

Following is a poetic response to ASIA: Wounds in the souls of the members of disappeared people’s families can never be cured, which appeared yesterday (September 26, 2014)

by John Joseph Clancey

Will there be another tomorrow?
Or, just another wife’s sorrow,
caused by her husband’s disappearance?

Will I hear my new-born baby’s cry?
Or, will she hear her mother’s sobbing sigh,
wondering about her husband’s disappearance?

Will I be sitting with my father in the Church pews?
Or, will he be constantly waiting for news,
since the first day of his son’s disappearance?

Will tomorrow be another worry-filled day?
Or, perhaps bring a much more creative way,
to avoid the inevitable disappearance?

So many have just gone, without a trace.
Does anyone know the precise time or exact place,
of their ultimate disappearance?

Can I ensure another tomorrow?
And prevent some further sorrow,

by disappearing before the planned disappearance?

For Basil Fernando,

who, in 1989, faced the dilemma: to disappear or be disappeared.

Courtesy: ASIAN HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION

Hrithik Roshan to star in ‘Mohenjo Daro’

By Mohammad Kamran Jawaid

Disney India and Ashutosh Gowariker Productions Pvt. Ltd (AGPPL) are to collaborate on Mohenjo Daro.

Directed by Gowariker, the film will star Hrithik Roshan and new comer Pooja Hegde in an epic adventure love story set at the time of the Indus Valley Civilization.

Mohenjo Daro, meaning Mound of the Dead in Sindhi, is a lost civilization that was abandoned in 19th century BCE. The city’s ruins lie in the Larkana district of Sindh, and are a designated Unesco World Heritage Site since 1980.

Given the settings, the movie is likely to be a sweeping historical extravaganza, along the lines of Jodhaa Akbar and Lagaan, the former also an association between UTV Motion Pictures (aka Disney India), while the latter an Oscar nominee for Best Foreign Film; both movies were critical and box-office hits.

According to a press release, Disney India Producer Sunita Gowariker said, “There has always been a natural creative synergy between UTV and AGPPL in our previous movies. This time through our collaboration with Disney we’ll have an even greater focus on entertaining families”.

“After Jodhaa Akbar, we are thrilled to work with Ashutosh and Hrithik again, and we are excited about bringing another wonderful Indian story to the big screen,” said Amrita Pandey, VP and Head of Marketing & Distribution, Disney Studios, India.

Mohenjo Daro is set to go into production in South Africa from October 2014.

Courtesy: DAWN
http://www.dawn.com/news/1126104/hrithik-roshan-to-star-in-mohenjo-daro

The Folktales of Sindh – An introduction – Words Without Borders

The Folklore and Literature Project, the forty-two-volume Sindhi folklore collection compiled by the scholar, philologist, and folklorist Nabi Bakhsh Khan Baloch (1917–2011) and published by the Sindhi Adabi Board, is one of the great treasures of world heritage. This literature spans the historic land of Sindh, home to the Indus Valley Civilization (3300–1300 BCE), situated in present-day Pakistan. It is likely that in the folktales preserved in the Sindhi language, we can find the structures and traces of the earliest stories from the Indus Valley Civilization

Baloch divided this literature into several broad categories: “Fables and fairy-tales; pseudo-historical romances; tales of historical nature; folk-poetry; folk songs; marriage songs; poems pertaining to wars and other events; riddles; proverbs; wit and humor; and folk customs.” Of this collection, seven volumes were dedicated to folktales: The Tales of Kings and Queens, Princes and Princesses (vol. 21), Tales of Kings, Viziers, and Merchants (vol. 22), Tales of Fairies, Giants, Magicians, and Witches (vol. 23), Tales of Kings, Money-lenders, Wise-Men, Thugs, and the Common People (vol. 24), Children’s Tales (vol. 25), Fables of Animals and Birds (vol. 26), and Even More Folktales (vol. 27).

Collected from both the oral tradition of the villagers and written records, the stories were gathered and compiled over five years from 1957 to 1961. A network of field workers stationed in each district transcribed the folktales from the oral accounts of villagers in different parts of Sindh. The field workers were instructed to transcribe the tales exactly as they heard them. At the compilation stage, different versions of the same tale were compared, the variants noted, and a final version prepared for publication. Where only a single version for a folktale was found, it was retained with minimum verbal modification necessary to make it readable.

Continue reading The Folktales of Sindh – An introduction – Words Without Borders

Sindhis should not need a visa to visit Sindh!

‘Sindhi’s should be exempted from visa for visiting Pakistan’

INDORE: Sindhi community on Sunday demanded that Sindhis of India and Pakistan should be exempted from getting visa for visiting each others’ countries.

The demand was raised on the third and last day of International Sindhi Conference in Indore. They urged the governments to relax visa rules so that Sindhis can visit Shindh, the place of their origin and come back after visiting their family members and relatives.

International Sindhi Community president Manohar Dev said demands were raised during the open session of the conference. He added that community has also appealed to the government of India to simplify the process of giving citizenship to people who come to India from Sindh Province of Pakistan. “There should be single-window system for giving citizenship to people who come to India from Sindh,” said Dev.

Secretary of the conference and city BJP president Shankar Lalwani said seats should be reserved for the community in Parliament and assembly so that they get a proper representation.

Courtesy: THE TIMES OF INDIA
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/indore/Sindhis-should-be-exempted-from-visa-for-visiting-Pakistan/articleshow/27470027.cms?fb_action_ids=10151736870271901&fb_action_types=og.recommends&fb_source=other_multiline&action_object_map=[532711570157297]&action_type_map=[%22og.recommends%22]&action_ref_map=[]

When the mountains were red

By Nadeem F. Paracha

Many Pakistani Pushtuns find themselves in a spot of bother when some political commentators and analysts define extremist organisations like the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) as an extension and expression of Pushtun nationalism.

Though religion has always played a central role in the make-up of Pushtun identity, Pushtun nationalism (especially in the 20th century) was always a more secular and left-leaning phenomenon. It still is.

This nationalism’s modern manifestation was founded on the thoughts and actions of Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan (Bacha Khan) and expressed through such left-wing parties as National Awami Party (NAP), Pakhtunkhwa Milli Awami Party (PkMAP) and the Awami National Party (ANP).

However, for nearly three decades now, or ever since the beginning of the US/Pakistan/Saudi-backed ‘jihad’ against the Soviet forces in Afghanistan in the 1980s, Pushtun identity (at least in popular imagination) has been gradually mutating into becoming to mean something that is akin to being aggressive, fanatical and entirely religious.

Yet, till 2008 the county’s Pushtuns were enthusiastically voting for secular Pushtun nationalist parties like the ANP, and till even this day, there are a number of Pushtuns who are openly canvasing to eradicate not only religious violence and extremism from the Pushtun-dominated province of Khyber-Puskhtunkhwa (KPK), but also busy working towards debunking the belief that Pushtuns are by nature fanatical, driven by revenge and radically ‘Islamist’ in orientation.

Such Pushtuns point out the unique Pushtun-centric secularism of men like Bacha Khan and how left-wing parties like NAP were once KPK’s most popular exponents of electoral politics.

They blame the Pakistani ‘establishment’ for corrupting the notion of Pushtun nationalism by radicalising large portions of the Pushtuns through radical religious indoctrination and the Saudi ‘Petro Dollar.’

The idea was to neutralise Pushtun nationalism that had been the leading player in NAP, a party that also included Baloch and Sindhi nationalists, and was suspiciously eyed (by the establishment) to have had separatist and anti-Pakistan sentiments.

In the last decade or so – especially ever since extremist violence gripped the country, and with the KPK and the tribal areas that surround the province becoming the epicentre of this violence – various Pushtun parties, groups and individuals have been aggressively using political, social and cultural platforms to challenge the perception that religious extremism found in certain Pushtun-dominated militant outfits have anything to do with Pushtun culture or nationalism.

But so far it has been an uphill task and unfortunately the word Pushtun continues to trigger images of bushy, violent fanatics exploding themselves up in markets and mosques or beheading ‘infidels’ in the hills and mountains of KPK and the tribal areas.

Continue reading When the mountains were red

Sindhi Language on Android

If you are an android user install multiling app using this link:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.klye.ime.latin&hl=en

You have enable Sindhi and replace default keyboard with multiling that you just installed, it also comes dictionary that means it starts to give you suggestions during the typing that means you have save time by selecting the suggested word instead of typing it. Now we text each other in Sindhi, which is interesting exercise as well as fun.

Courtesy: Sindhi e-lists/ e-groups, July 2, 2013.

One Sindhi refugee’s story.

A rags-to-riches story

The India Club in Oud Metha on Sunday evening saw the launch of the second edition of his autobiography called Taking the High Road by Indian tycoon Dr Ram Buxani.

Buxani started working in Dubai some five decades ago. Back then he made Dh8 (125 Indian rupees) a month at ITL and today, he is a 50 per cent shareholder in the same group.

In his speech, besides thanking his well-wishers, the 72-year-old Sindhi-speaker talked about the difficulties he faced on his way up.

“Our (UAE) Rulers have a rare art of sailing through difficult times,” Buxani said.

“This decade has brought me on a unique pedestal which I had never dreamt of… Murij Manghnani and I have been associates for 54 years and I am thankful to God, friends and associates for this association,” he said.

“The company itself is completing 60 years this year. I am indeed grateful to Murij Manghnani for his constant guidance and pray that it remains with us for a long time.”

Indian Ambassador M. K. Lokesh was among the guests during the book launch. “The success and contribution of the Indian community in the region must be told as all such stories everywhere in the world,” Lokesh said.

Buxani is chairman of the India Club, Dubai. He was also chairman of Indian High School, Dubai, from 2000 to 2004.

He is also a board member of Al Noor Training Centre for Children with Special Needs in Dubai.

Buxani was generous in his acknowledgement of his family support. He made special mention of his wife Veena, and spoke of the empty-nest syndrome as well: “Living without children at home gives rare sad feelings and realisation as to how a house can be without kids.

When we marry, we often like to have a honeymoon period without anyone around. But after a couple of decades we start liking having everyone around us and that becomes the honeymoon. That’s what we have started missing”.

The proceeds from the sales of the book, priced at Dh90, will go towards Al Noor Training Centre for Children with Special Needs.

Courtesy: Khaleej Times
http://www.khaleejtimes.com/kt-article-display-1.asp?xfile=data/todayevent/2013/June/todayevent_June24.xml&section=todayevent

A million postcards addressed to the PM’s Office in New Delhi have been sent by Sindhi-speaking residents of India to demand a Sindhi language channel at Doordarshan TV

A million postcards to save a language

By Manoj R Nair, Hindustan Times

Since March 2012, thousands of postcards addressed to the Prime Minister’s Office in New Delhi have been sent from cities and small towns in the country that has Sindhi-speaking residents. These handwritten messages postcards, which have the names and telephone numbers of the senders, have one

demand: a Sindhi-language television channel from government-run broadcaster Doordarshan.

Tens of thousands of these cards have been posted from Mumbai too. One group – the Bandra-based Friends of International Sindhis – collected Rs. 60,000 at their Diwali function in 2012 and purchased 1,20,000 postcards priced at 50 paise each.

Sindhi is one of the languages listed in the 8th schedule of the constitution, but with no linguistic state of their own to keep it flourishing, the community worries that the tongue is hurtling towards extinction.

Asha Chand, secretary of Sindhi Sangat, a Mumbai-based group explains why they are worried about their mother tongue’s future. “How do you learn a language? It is by hearing someone speak it. Children learn a language by hearing their parents talking it. But, when a large number of Sindhis have stopped speaking the language, how will they pass it on to their children?” she asked.

After they migrated to India after partition, Sindhis set up newspapers and schools in their language. But, as newer generations shifted to schools in English and other languages, these newspapers and schools have declined or closed down. For instance, the K J Khilnani School in Mahim, which is situated next to large housing colony of Sindhi-speakers, once held classes in the language. The school has now switched to the English medium and few children from the housing colony study there.

Continue reading A million postcards addressed to the PM’s Office in New Delhi have been sent by Sindhi-speaking residents of India to demand a Sindhi language channel at Doordarshan TV

Congressman Brad Sherman urged the Secretary of State that U.S. should spend a million and a half dollars broadcasting the service of the Voice of America in Sindhi language

Aid cut to Pakistan won’t be in US interest: Kerry

During the hearing Congressman Brad Sherman urged the Secretary of State for broadcasting the service of the Voice of America in Sindhi language.

“There’s probably no more important country than Pakistan and nothing more important than our public outreach to the Pakistani people, yet we’re broadcasting only in Urdu. This committee voted overwhelmingly that we should spend a million and a half dollars broadcasting in the Sindhi language,” he said.

Continue reading Congressman Brad Sherman urged the Secretary of State that U.S. should spend a million and a half dollars broadcasting the service of the Voice of America in Sindhi language

Congressman Sherman raised VOA-Sindhi with Secretary of state John Kerry

Washington: Hon. Congressman Brad Sherman continues to advocate on behalf of Sindhis across the world. At House Committee on Foreign Affairs Hearing, Congressman Sherman spoke with Secretary John Kerry about the need for a Sindhi Voice of America program. You can hear his remarks here starting at the 0:26 mark. SAPAC is immensely grateful for Congressman Sherman’s dedication to the Sindhi people.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmHjTaWo63o&feature=youtu.be

Courtesy: Sindhi e-lists/ e-groups, April 18, 2013.

Nothing is worse than aggressive stupidity – Mir Mohammad Ali Talpur

The Pakistani establishment is trying to solve the problems by the very same methods that created them in the first place

Seemingly, warped logic motivates the Pakistani establishment where the Baloch or Sindhis are concerned. I was not amazed at reading the news that the Balochistan High Court (BHC) demanded an explanation from the federal information secretary, the chairman of the Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority, the provincial information secretary and Balochistan public relations director as to why its order about stopping statements of militants belonging to banned organisations from being disseminated by electronic and print media had not been implemented. It is pertinent to mention that in October 2011, the BHC banned reports about militants in the media. This demand comes in the wake of the March 15, 2013 notification of the interior ministry that the Baloch Students Organization (Azad) and Jeay Sindh Muttahida Mahaz (JSMM) stood banned, ironically with a clutch of Pakistan’s former but now out-of-control proxies, as terrorist organisations.

Interestingly, the report, “State of Journalism in Balochistan 2011” by the Pakistan Federal Union of Journalists states that in 2010, “The Baloch Musala Diffa Army (BMDA) called the Khuzdar Press Club and warned that since the Baloch separatist organisations are engaged in the targeted killings of innocent people, the journalists should not give space to them in their newspapers. The caller who identified himself as Mir Jang Baloch also warned that any journalist found covering their activities would be killed by them.” So the BDMA issued directives were adopted by the BHC too. As if these threats and directives were not enough, on April 6 the offices of the outspoken Daily Tawar, which reports on Baloch issues, was ransacked, looted and set on fire in Karachi. Had any other paper’s office suffered this fate the sky would have come crashing down.

This warped logic becomes even more poignant when it is seen that avowedly sectarian outfits under the garb of respectability in new names have unhindered access to the media, especially when Maulana Mohammad Ahmad Ludhianvi, the head of the Ahle Sunnat Wal Jamaat (ASWJ), gives an interview to an English weekly, and no one bothers. This brazen double standard could perhaps be explained by a Sheikh Saadi parable. A poet overestimating his poetic prowess and hoping to get a reward went to a robber baron’s lair with a eulogy. Instead of appreciating the gesture, the uncivilised robber baron had him thrashed and sent him away naked. Winter it was and this cowering unfortunate soul hoped to slink away unnoticed but suddenly a pack of dogs descended on him and as he tried to lift stones to fend them off, he found them frozen hard in the ground. Exasperated he said, “Een che hast, mardumaanand, saggaan ra kushaada, ‘o’ sing ra basta” (how vilely evil these folk are, they have unleashed the dogs and tied the stones). The establishment here is engaged in just such an exercise.

The pronouncements of the Baloch nationalists seem to threaten the establishment no end and it is making a concerted effort to curb Baloch rights. This banning and curbing of the Baloch and Sindhi organisations exposes the establishment’s bias against those who want their rights while it turns a blind eye to its own sponsored ‘death squads’ in Balochistan and the sectarian organisations there and elsewhere.

JSMM for long has been actively struggling for the historical and political rights of the people of Sindh, and in the last few years quite a few of its leaders have become victims of the abduct, torture and murder policy. On April 20, Siraie Qurban Kohawar, Ropilu Cholyani and Noorullah Tunio of JSMM were travelling from Khipro to Sanghar in a car; they were intercepted and fired upon by unidentified armed men in a Toyota Land Cruiser who then set their car alight. Kohawar and Choulyani were killed on the spot while the injured Tunio, who later died, recorded his statement with the police.

Continue reading Nothing is worse than aggressive stupidity – Mir Mohammad Ali Talpur

Day of Remembrance for Sindhi Martyrs in Los Angeles Commemorated

Tributes paid to all the Martyrs of Sindh on the Anniversary of Bashir Qureshi

Los Angeles, CA  [Press Release] April 7th, 2013**,* Several activists from different parts of Southern California gathered on Sunday the April 7th in local restaurant to commemorate the anniversary of *Bashir Qureshi*, a Sindh leader

who was poisoned to death on the same day a year ago. In last few years Sindh political and civil society leaders have been targeted by the security establishment and by the fascists groups in Karachi.

This event was organized by World Sindhi Congress, a human rights advocacy, based in UK and USA. Participants paid tribute to *Muzafar Bhutto*, *Ghazala Siddiqui, Rooplo Choliyani, Sirai Qurban Khawar, Parveen Rehman, Noorullah Tunio, *and *Samiullah Kalhoro.*

“While world is reading about the terrorism inflicted by Islamic militants upon Shias and other civilian population, the Indigenous people of Sindh and Balochistan are facing terrorism from other parties, the targeted killings of our leaders and workers by the security agencies and fascist groups in Karachi,” said Dr. Saghir Shaikh, the member executive committee World Sindhi Congress. “Fascists groups even did not spare our women leaders, Ghazala Siddiqui and Parveen Rehman,” further said Shaikh.

Amongst others who attended include Malik Dino Shaikh of WSC, Rahman Kakepoto of WSC and also a President of G M Syed Memorial Committee, Sani Panwhar and Bashir Mahar of Sindhi Association of North America, Sobhya Agha, an activist from Sindh Pakistan, Venus Shaikh, Suniti Kakepoto, Susanna Shaikh, Jaffar Shah and Benazir Shaikh of International Sindhi Women’s Organization (ISWO). Sobhya Agha conducted the program, Mr Kakepoto

introduced the activities and mission of World Sindhi Congress, Mr. Malik Shaikh offered the vote of thanks to all the participants.

On platform of the WSC we shall continue to inform the international community about the on-going atrocities on Sindhi people and to raise the issue of targeted killings and forced disappearances at the UN forums, said Mr. Kakepoto of WSC.

Winds from Sindh – Sindhi Music Festival in Delhi, India.

The Sindhi [Secular] Sufi Music Festival this weekend focuses on an example of shared heritage of India and Pakistan

The Delhi Government has become known for promoting art and culture with a number of festivals throughout the year. To brighten up this weekend is the Sindhi Sufi Music Festival organised by the Department of Art, Culture and Languages. Here, singers from India and Pakistan come together to sing Sufi compositions.

Two leading singers from Pakistan — Sanam Marvi and Tufail Sanjrani — will join their Indian counterparts — Ghansham Vaswani, Kajal Chandiramani and Uma Lalla — to showcase the shared culture of Sindhis through the poetry of Sufis like Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai. Kathak dancer Namrata Pamnani will also perform at the festival. March 16 and 17, Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts (IGNCA) from 5 p.m.

Courtesy: The Hindu
http://www.thehindu.com/features/friday-review/music/winds-from-sindh/article4512921.ece

Malik Riaz ‘nabbed’ ? Dream Island crashes-X

zardari saleBy Amir Mateen

The good news is that the NAB finally woke up to stop Port Qasim Authority from giving further concessions to Malik Riaz of Bahria Town to build, if at all he plans to do that, the alleged Island City, 3.5 km off the Karachi coast.

Of course, Malik will continue to publish ads showing fabulous pictures of Dubai’s man-made islands besides announcements about building the world’s biggest Mall and the tallest building. No explanation is given about the equity; who will put in how much money and how. And this is about a whopping sum of $ 45 billion. But Malik Riaz keeps changing his figures as pennies in his pocket. After the Abu Dhabi Group backed out, Malik Riaz brought the figure down to Rs 15 billion investment through a news report from his ‘chosen’ editor and newspaper.

The figure was ballooned to $ 15 billion in six hours and then to $ 20 within 24 hours–interestingly propagated by the same media groups. Bahria rose the figure back to its original claim of raising $ 45 billion in its ads published by almost all mainstream newspaper. Only this time there was no name and face of the investor, except the promise that a consortium of Arab and Europeans will descend upon Pakistan soon to pledge the $ 45 billion just because “Bahria commits, Bahria delivers.”

Thousands of cases exist where Bahria has not delivered at all with people running from pillar to post to recover their life-savings– Awami Villas (DHA phase-2 extension), Bahria Town Phase 9, DHA Valley, REHC, just to name a few.

What we have on the table is the grand arrival of controversial US investor, Thomas Kramer, whose net worth is $ 90 million. How will he bring in the promised money is yet to be seen. Malik Riaz shows a loss of Rs 107 million in his personal income declaration for the last three years (2010-12). He owes another Rs 107 billion in taxes as documented by the Federal Tax Ombudsman (FTO) and much more to investors whom he is yet to ‘deliver’ despite taking billions in advance illegally. Yet he keeps buying jet planes, the latest being a $ 20 million worth hawker Beech craft that he bought last month, perhaps to facilitate the electoral candidates that he is supposed to ‘deliver’ from every political party. The likelihood is that he may not declare this as he has not declared the Rs 850 million that he declared on TV to have spent on Shahbaz Sharif’s Ashiana Scheme or the Rs 2 billion that he claims to spend on feeding people.

So the only concrete thing on ground is the dubiously acquired State land for which he invites investors.

The NAB, we are told, took notice of complaints under the Prevention of Corruption Initiatives regarding the award of contract by the PQA. This was done after several complaints from Transparency International, consumer watchdogs and nationalists. The Sindh Assembly opposition lodged explosive protest against the sale of the ‘motherland.’ It got provoked because nobody consulted the Assembly about giving the project, which, among other things, entails building the world’s tallest building on its soil. Sindhi nationalists got incensed over Prime Minister Pervaiz Ashraf receiving the US tycoon who is accused of rape, child-molestation and many other traits that he shares with his hosts here.

He was also received by the MQM contingent including Governor Ishratul Ibad, who went a step forward by offering him 4500 acres over and above the 1200 acres ‘delivered’ by the PQA. Malik seems everybody in his pocket. Who else can bring an alleged rapist and make the high and the mighty of this land receive him without any notice. “What is going on here?,” asked Sindhi activist Zulfiqar Halipoto who led a protest rally in Islamabad. A placard in the rally asked: “How stupid can we become?”

Endlessly, we think. The NAB surprised everybody by advising “the PQA not to sign any concession agreement in violation of RFP, government rules and regulations.” It bragged that it has made mandatory for the PQA to get the contract vetted by a panel of experts also “give a presentation regarding compliance of all terms and conditions of agreement by the Bahria Town.”

The bad news is that nobody trusts the NAB, which is accused as “Bahria’s laundry shop” where they like to take their difficult cases to get a tag of piety. NAB Chairman Fasih Bokhari had his daughter working for Bahria Town earlier. Bokhari, who served in Pakistan Navy when Bahria was in partnership with it, was accused of having clandestine arrangements with Malik Riaz in a court of law. Many think that the NAB shows the interest to take the charge and give a clean chit t Malik Riaz. Only in movies, you might say.

Interestingly, Malik Riaz identifies himself with movie characters. His web site actually shows a long note in his own writing comparing his life with the hero of Bollywoods movie Guru (Abhishek Bachan). He writes, the chapter is titled “Guru or king-maker,” that as Guru he also grew against all odds. He particularly mentions the climax, where Guru thunders before an inquiry board that “I tried to play it straight but I was obstructed because nothing happened without bribery and corruption.” He goes on to describe that, as Guru, Malik Riaz also had to “open the doors” whatever it took from ‘sifarish’ to bribery to violence. In the process, he says, he made himself rich and everybody else. The crux is that, as Guru, that the ordinary courts could not judge him as it is for the people to decide.

Continue reading Malik Riaz ‘nabbed’ ? Dream Island crashes-X