Tag Archives: Z. A. Bhutto

A leaf from history: Zia rejects PNA’s conditions

By Shaikh Aziz

The news of Z.A. Bhutto’s conviction shocked the PPP workers and supporters who hadn’t thought that Gen Zia would stoop so low. Though some violent protests took place in parts of Lahore and Sindh, the general law and order situation was not seriously affected as the government had taken measures to prevent the breaking out of any violence. For some reason the upper leadership of the party remained out of the scene, leaving the PPP workers directionless.

The military courts became over-active in handing down punishments of jail time and lashing. It was clear that the government wanted to send a message to the top PPP leadership that they could also be arrested in order to keep the administration working smoothly.

Two days after the judgment, on March 20, 1978, retired Gen Tikka Khan was arrested under martial law regulation No 33 for his involvement in political activities. Benazir Bhutto who was under house-arrest at her Karachi residence moved the Sindh government to arrange her meeting with her father at Lahore jail. The meeting was arranged for March 25.

The military regime cracks down on protests in the wake of Bhutto’s conviction

The PPP lawyers worked round the clock to prepare an appeal to be filed in the Supreme Court. Some PPP leaders were of the opinion that there was no need to file an appeal against the verdict; instead they wanted to approach the military government through friendly circles to settle the matter amicably. However, saner elements in the party prevailed and finally an appeal was filed in the Supreme Court on March 25.

As the foreign minister in Ayub Khan’s government and later as the prime minister, Bhutto had developed friendships with a number of world leaders, especially in the Third World and the Arab countries. Now facing a death sentence he hoped they could prevail upon Gen Zia to spare his life. While messages from world leaders were coming in calling for a pardon for Bhutto, Libyan leader Muammar Qadhafi’s envoy, Abdul Ali Ubaidi, called on Gen Zia and conveyed to him a message from his president. Zia told him that at this stage the matter was pending with the highest court and he did not want to interfere in it.

While meeting foreign leaders Gen Zia always made sure that the meeting took place without any aide. It was, therefore, impossible to make out what the contents of the talks were and what transpired, leaving the people guessing.

Relieved of a major task of handling Bhutto which was now being done by the courts, Gen Zia focused his attention on strengthening his position politically. However he camouflaged his attempts in such a manner that he could not be blamed for being too ambitious. In this regard he was equally helped by some political leaders. He also began studying the lives and working styles of eminent dictators, like Napoleon Bonaparte, Adolf Hitler, Marshal Tito and Mussolini, who stayed in power for many years without being challenged by the people. He apparently wanted to learn how these dictators managed to retain power for so long. He also used to engage some of his associates in debates on what style of governanvce would work in Pakistan.

While messages from world leaders were coming in calling for a pardon for Bhutto, Libyan leader Muammar Qadhafi’s envoy, Abdul Ali Ubaidi, called on Gen Zia and conveyed to him a message from his president. Zia told him that at this stage the matter was pending with the highest court and he did not want to interfere in it.

During this time it appeared that the Pakistan National Alliance (PNA) was heading towards a break-up; Asghar Khan and Maulana Noorani had already parted ways. After the overthrow of Bhutto’s government, the PNA had decided to keep away from any interim arrangement offered by the military government. They remembered the performance of the Advisory Council Gen Zia had formed on Jan 14 to run the affairs of the government. Though the task of the council was to help in handling state affairs, Gen Zia himself supervised everything which negated the purpose of the council.

Continue reading A leaf from history: Zia rejects PNA’s conditions

Bhutto was Hussain’s follower. Hussain and his follower never die.

Bhutto Lives! – by Mohammad Ali Mahar, Austin, TX

There are some who are born with a personal charm. Others have the privilege of being born with a golden spoons in their mouths. Then there are those who achieve the best of the best education in the best of the educational institutions. A few people attain the highest of the high positions. Very few have a combination of the above. He was among the rare breed of men to have them all. He was certainly no ordinary man. He was Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto.

While interviewing Henry Kissinger, Oriana Fallaci asked who was the greatest leader ever Mr. Kissinger had the privilege of meeting (Interview with History). He rebounded the question to Oriana. Oriana was a great admirer of Indira Gandhi. She had recently done her interview. So, she presented Indira’s name. Kissinger did not agree. Shah of Iran. No. Castro. No. Tito. No. Shah Faisal. No. Nixon. Certainly not.

Then finally, reluctantly, she uttered Bhutto’s name. Oriana in a way hated Bhutto. Bhutto had her abducted from Karachi Airport – while she was on her way to interview Shah of Iran – to present his side of the story in reply to Mrs. Gandhi’s interview after the fall of Dhaka. Kissinger’s face brightened. He told Oriana that Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto was the greatest leader he had ever met. He told Oriana that it was not just the oratorical qualities, not just the education, not even the political upbringing that were necessary ingredients for a leader. It was the combination of all those plus the statesmanship that was required of a great leader. With a smile on his face, he told Oriana that only Bhutto had all those traits. He told Oriana Fallaci that in his opinion Bhutto was the greatest of the leaders of the world.

In 1963, young Bhutto visited the United Sates of America as Foreign Minister of Pakistan. His schedule included a meeting with President J. F. Kennedy. At the end of the meeting, Mr. Kennedy was so impressed by this

young fellow that he told him that had Bhutto been an American, he would have been on Mr. Kennedy’s cabinet. To which Bhutto spontaneously replied, “Beware Mr. President. If I were an American, I would not be in your cabinet, I would be in your place”.

Kennedy liked the reply so much that before his death, he told everyone he met of the courage and wit of this young Pakistani minister.

Bhutto was sent to gallows 20 years ago. Some say that he died that day. I don’t believe that. Bhutto was Hussain’s follower. Hussain and his follower never die.

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Courtesy → : The above article was originally posted by Mohammad Ali Mahar on SANAlist on April 4, 2000.  After 11 years, here it is once again, as a tribute to a great leader who lives in our hearts even though his body is buried at Garhi Khuda Bux, Larkano, Sindh.

SHAHEED ZULFIKAR ALI BHUTTO: THE LION KING

by: Dr. Javaid Laghari

Quaid-e-Awam Shaheed Zulfikar Ali Bhutto strode the national scene like a lion king. For the past four decades he towered over the nation’s politics. It is a measure of his greatness that today the politics of the country revolves round his name.

Continue reading SHAHEED ZULFIKAR ALI BHUTTO: THE LION KING

A Review of Fatima Bhutto’s Songs of Blood and Sword – By Saba Imtiaz

The Bhuttos and their books – By Saba Imtiaz

Courtesy: Afpak

Over the past four decades, the name Bhutto has come to symbolize — depending on which version of history you believe — Pakistan. It has become our lot in life to obsess over the Bhuttos, discuss their macabre deaths — Zulfikar was hanged, Shah Nawaz poisoned, Murtaza and Benazir shot — and wonder how many more Bhuttos will come to rule over Pakistan.

Continue reading A Review of Fatima Bhutto’s Songs of Blood and Sword – By Saba Imtiaz

Contributions of Z.A. Bhutto & Benazir Bhutto for welfare of Sindh and Sindhis

by Khalid Hashmani
After realizing that the representation of Sindhis was substantially lower than their population, he secured buy-in from of the Pakistani establishment to reserve 19% Federal jobs for Sindh with 60% and 40% allocation between rural and urban areas respectively. The nationalization of Banks, Insurance companies, and Heavy Industries further expanded this coverage to a part of private sector as well.

Those who went to Sindh’s colleges and universities (including Sindh University) in mid sixties know that only about 30% of students were Sindhis. Z. A. Bhutto played a key role in establishing a quota system with 60%-40% rural-urban distribution.

Helped to open seven or eight major institutions in Sindh (including Khairpur University, Chandka Medical College, Nawabshah Engineering College, Nawabshah Girls Medical College, etc.) thereby substantially increasing educational opportunities for Sindhis.

Continue reading Contributions of Z.A. Bhutto & Benazir Bhutto for welfare of Sindh and Sindhis

Bangladesh hangs Mujib killers. Who will hang Bhuttos’ killers??

Bangladesh hangs Mujib killers

Bangladesh has executed five ex-army officers convicted of killing the country’s independence leader in 1975.

Courtesy: BBC News

The men killed Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, the president’s wife, three sons, two daughters-in-law and approximately 20 others as part of a military coup.

Only hours earlier the Bangladeshi law minister had announced that they would be executed by Sunday but could be “hanged at any moment”.

Continue reading Bangladesh hangs Mujib killers. Who will hang Bhuttos’ killers??

Some bitter facts about late Ghulam Mustafa Jatoi

by: Mohammad Khan Sial

Our some friends are paying rich tributes to late Ghulam Mustafa Jatoi, His life can be divided into two parts. As well as first part is concerned, their tribute to late G M Jatoi is generally correct but there were some bitter facts about 2nd part of his life.

01. When army dictator Ziaul Haq removed elected Govt of Z. A. Bhutto, there were the persons who immediately met Gen Zia in the darkness of night. They were Ghulam Mustafa Jatoi and Maulana Kausar Niazi..

Continue reading Some bitter facts about late Ghulam Mustafa Jatoi

Musharraf’s Musical Masti

Courtesy: Globeistan, August 21st, 2009

By B. R. Gowani

Rome was burning

While Nero was playing the fiddle

Some truth and some not…

Rome was burning, that is true

but no music was playing then

though he knew the lyre and was a singer

Like other Roman Emperors,

Nero was cruel and merciless

During his heinous reign

Christians were thrown to the dogs

In 64 CE

When 25% of Rome burnt to ashes

And 50% was badly damaged

Nero could not have been fiddling;

There were no fiddles then.

Musharraf’s policies set Pakistan on fire

True it continues to rage on …

Not yet under control

He is playing the tabla and singing songs in England,

where it appears he’ll be the Queen’s guest for a while

If he returns to Pakistan

And the judiciary proves stronger;

Then shed no tears for him

For the military will ship him out for medical treatment.

Rest assured no one can touch him,

He is of the military elite

And no such fate as Z. A. Bhutto can be allowed.

B. R. Gowani can be reached brgowani@hotmail.com

Source – http://globeistan.com/?p=3857

Memories of my childhood in Zia’s rule

by Prof. Nadeem Jamali

My childhood in Karachi, during Gen. Zia’s rule, the government organized massive celebrations on each independence day. Citizens of Karachi in particular — mostly non-Sindhis- participated in these celebrations enthusiastically, with Pakistani flags everywhere.

In our Sindhi home, we were not done mourning Bhutto’s hanging. Seeing my father sitting in dark, with tears in his eyes was very difficulty. I had cut out black and white pictures of Bhutto from the newspapers reporting his death, and put them in frames all around the house.

P*** flags were not allowed in our house. We were Sindhis, not Pa****. In the GOR (Government Officers Residence) neighborhood on Bath Island, our apartment stuck out as a home that did not celebrate independence. To me and my brother, just over 10 years old children, this was not fun. It was isolating. It was also frightening at times. On one occasion, some kids in the neighborhood, after visiting our home for a birthday party and noticing the un-Pakistani life style, threatened to report our family to the martial law government… Our father laughed it off, but we children were nervous. But August 14th came around, more than anything else, we felt a sense of isolation, of not being part of something celebratory going on all around us, of missing out.

So, one year, we pleaded with our father to let us bring some Pa**** flag decorations to hang from our balcony. After some initial resistance, he relented, perhaps appreciating what the children were going through. It was great fun. Our balcony looked beautiful. It no longer looked like a balcony of sourpusses. We were like everyone else, one with our neighborhood, joined in a celebration.

I don’t remember the exact reasons, but when the next year’s independence day came, we children did not feel like getting any P*** flags. Perhaps we had grown up a bit and realized that there were things more important than being part of a celebration. .. the enemy’s celebration. Or perhaps the MRD movement had begun.

Courtesy: Sindhi e-lists/ e-groups.

Salam Benazir Bhutto

By Javed Larik

An other wound in the soul of nation. No body will take her place. She is martyr (Shaheed). Daughter of Shaheed became shaheed. She fulfilled her promise and laid down her life for the people. Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto must be proud of (Benazir Shaheed) Pinki.

She proved to be his continuation even up to her last breath. She certainly knew the cost of being among the people. None could separate her from people. None could intimidate her. Oh the daughter of east, oh the daughter of land, Oh MARVI MALIR JEE we salute you. SALAM BENAZIR you will rule the hearts we will never forget you.

Mir Murtaza Bhutto and Fatima Bhutto

mirandfatima.jpg – Mir Murtaza Bhutto

(September 18, 1954- September 20, 1996)

Murtaza Bhtto, the elder son of Shaheed Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, was a revolutionary. Bhutto campaigned as an independent in the 1993 elections, winning a seat in the assembly governing the Sindh province. In 1996, he accused police of unfairly targeting his organization. Several hours after the conference, he was shot and killed along with six supporters during an altercation with the police. Murtaza was killed by police in 1996 in Karachi, during the premiership of his sister, Benazir Bhutto.

Fatima Bhutto (born 29 May 1982) is a young poet, writer and columnist who came to fame after the appearance of her first book, a collection of poems, titled Whispers of the Desert. Fatima was only 15 years old when the collection was published.

She is now a columnist for The News in Pakistan. She received notable coverage for her second book. Fatima is the daughter of the Shaheed Murtaza Bhutto. She is the grand-daughter of former Prime Minister, Z.A. Bhutto. Fatima is not known to be very active political worker. She is however far more active as a political writer and spares no body in criticism. Fatima’s style of writing resembles that of “Arab News” jovial writer Jehad Khazin. Her writings reflect some Pan-arabism , Liberalism and a lot of multi-directional political sides.