Category Archives: Personalities

MQM chief Altaf Hussain repents mistake of his ancestors to migrate from India to Pakistan

Mr. Narendra Modi, please speak out for “Muhaajirs” (India’s refugees living in Karachi and other parts) in Pakistan: MQM chief to India’s PM

Courtesy: Youtube
Via: Above news and heading adopted from facebook news feed.

Read more >> ZeeNews
http://zeenews.india.com/india/mr-narendra-modi-pls-speak-out-for-muhajirs-in-pakistan-mqm-chief-to-indian-pm_1989219.html

‘A Complaint’

Poetry by Hassan Dars

Translated from Sindhi by Mohammed Hanif and Gobind Menghwar.

You do not have the time
To feel with your own hands
The sharp edge of history’s sword
You curse love itself,
You mock it
You do not even know
The love they give you
You don’t know the assassins’ intent
You haven’t met their new generations
Their daggers’ thirst
Unquenchable
I swear by the martyrs of Makli
Time is the lost ring of an unknown soldier
That can fit around the finger of any thief
Now you are walking into the circus with them!
Our rope is broken midway
We have fallen into the open jaws of crocodiles.
While we lie here buried deep in our defeat
You are in the midst of their victory feast!
I wish you’d remember your land
I wish you’d remember your country
Your street

Charles Dickens

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way.Charles Dickens

  • Via » Above paragraph adopted from social media.

Sur Saamoondi

Translation and Transcription by Emily Hauze

لاهيان جي نه چِتان، الا! اُن مَ وِسران
مَڙهيو مَنجهارن، جيءُ منهنجو جن سين
شاهه عبدالطيف ڀٽائي

In romanized Sindhi:

Laahiyaan jay na chitaan, alla! un ma wisraan,
Marrhiyo manjharan, jeeu muhinjo jin seen.
~ Secular Sindhi Soofi poet Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai (1689 – 1752)
Sur Saamoondi

“O Heavens! His heart and mine from within are entwined;
Let me abide in his mind; if forgotten, I die.”

—-
Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai: from “Sur Samoondi”
in my translation.
—-

An explanation for those who do not know the context: “Sur Samundi” is the chapter in which Shah Latif writes from the perspective of young women whose husbands are sailors. They wait in anxiety, love, and hope, while their men are at sea, and they pray to be reunited. For Shah Latif, reunion with the husband equates to reunion with the Beloved (God), for which the Sufi soul is eternally longing.

Courtesy: Emily Hauze + Social media
https://www.facebook.com/emily.hauze/media_set?set=a.10206112358000488.1073741949.1608960197&type=3

“If Someone Speaks Unfairly Of Pakistan, It Is Painful To Me…” – Says Emily An American

How does it feel when a foreigner, especially an American falls in love with Pakistan?

Surprisingly this is not a fairy tale but a true story of Emily Hauze who fell in love with Pakistan and the culture of Sindh. The story does not end here. She initiated on a personal level to improve the image of Pakistan. Isn’t it surprising?

Jovago Pakistan got the opportunity to interview Emily to know more about her views, experiences and thoughts about Pakistan. 

Our first question is who is Emily Hauze? Tell us a little detail about yourself.

I am an American blogger, photographer, and generally curious person. I grew up in a very small town in the southern state of Tennessee, but moved to Pennsylvania, where I did my bachelor’s and master’s degrees (in Music and German literature).

I am a lifelong student of all facets of arts and culture — not only photography but all forms of visual art, and theatre, dance, and of course literature and music.

How do you finance your trips?

In general, the only major expense for me on my trips is the plane ticket. That and also the cost of obtaining a Visa, for which I have to reapply each time I come. But once I arrive in Pakistan, I find that I am not allowed to pay for anything.

Since I always stay with friends, lodgings are not an issue, and food is always abundant and shared freely in Pakistani homes.

I am not much interested in shopping, so I don’t have to save up much for that purpose. Beyond this, many of the cultural and historic sites I visit with my friends and family are free or very inexpensive.

Continue reading “If Someone Speaks Unfairly Of Pakistan, It Is Painful To Me…” – Says Emily An American

Doucmentry Of Abdul Sattar Edhi

Courtesy:  Al Jazeera + DailyMotion Via ZemTv

See Al Jazeera Doucmentry Of Abdul Sattar Edhi For Nobel Price

The Forgotten Story Of Allah Bux Soomro, India’s Hero Who Strongly Opposed The ‘2 Nation’ Theory

by Nishant Raj

The name Allah Bux has for long been mistreated on both sides of the border. Allah Bux Soomro, the man who stood for righteousness and advocated secularism, still remains an unsung hero. The prime minister of Sindh during the Quit India Movement of 1942 and the founder of the Ittehad Party, he was one of the first people to vehemently oppose the two-nation theory.

Read more » ScoopWhoop
See more » http://www.scoopwhoop.com/The-Story-Of-Allah-Bux-Soomro/

Shaheed Allah Bux Soomro

On 14 May 2016, we have organised a seminar in the memory of Shaheed Allah Bux Soomro. Premier of Sindh during British era. A man of vision, messenger of Interfaith Harmony great patriotic of the Asian subcontinent and above all his love for his motherland Sindh and Humanity. He sacrificed his life but did not compromise with exploiters who exploited religion for their personal interests.
His speech in Delhi in 1940 is a proof of his moderate, liberal and visionary opinion.

You are cordially invited. Venue: Arts Council Karachi, Sindh. Date: Saturday 14 May, 2016; Time: 4.30 p.m

Friends of Sindhu Civilization

Gabriel García Márquez Quotes: 20 Sayings From Late Nobel Laureate To Celebrate His Legacy

By

Excerpt:

Here are 10 quotes from his work to remember Gabriel García Márquez by:

1. “There is always something left to love.” — “One Hundred Years of Solitude”

2. “He was still too young to know that the heart’s memory eliminates the bad and magnifies the good, and that thanks to this artifice we manage to endure the burden of the past.” —  “Love in the Time of Cholera”

3. “The adolescents of my generation, greedy for life, forgot in body and soul about their hopes for the future until reality taught them that tomorrow was not what they had dreamed, and they discovered nostalgia.” — “Memories of My Melancholy Whores”

4. “You can’t eat hope,’ the woman said. You can’t eat it, but it sustains you,’ the colonel replied.” —  “El Coronel no tiene quien le escriba”

5. “He allowed himself to be swayed by his conviction that human beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them, but that life obliges them over and over again to give birth to themselves.” —  “Love in the Time of Cholera”

6. “It’s enough for me to be sure that you and I exist at this moment.” — “One Hundred Years of Solitude”

7. “They were so close to each other that they preferred death to separation.” — “One Hundred Years of Solitude”

8. “Be calm. God awaits you at the door.” —  “Love in the Time of Cholera”

9. “Disbelief is more resistant than faith because it is sustained by the senses.” — “Of Love and Other Demons”

10. “Humanity, like armies in the field, advances at the speed of the slowest.” —  “Love in the Time of Cholera”

Continue reading Gabriel García Márquez Quotes: 20 Sayings From Late Nobel Laureate To Celebrate His Legacy

‘I Am Truly and Deeply Concerned’ – Gorbachev

 

Excerpt:

Gorbachev Interview: ‘I Am Truly and Deeply Concerned’

Interview Conducted by and Britta Sandberg

SPIEGEL: Do you think it is possible there could be another major war in Europe?

Gorbachev: Such a scenario shouldn’t even be considered. Such a war today would inevitably lead to a nuclear war. But the statements from both sides and the propaganda lead me to fear the worst. If one side loses its nerves in this inflamed atmosphere, then we won’t survive the coming years.

SPIEGEL: Aren’t you overstating things a bit?

Gorbachev: I don’t say such things lightly. I am a man with a conscience. But that’s the way things are. I am truly and deeply concerned.

SPIEGEL: The new Russian military doctrine labels NATO’s eastern expansion and the “reinforcement of NATO’s offensive capabilities” as one of the primary threats facing Russia. Do you agree?

Gorbachev: NATO’s eastward expansion has destroyed the European security architecture as it was defined in the Helsinki Final Act in 1975. The eastern expansion was a 180-degree reversal, a departure from the decision of the Paris Charter in 1990 taken together by all the European states to put the Cold War behind us for good. Russian proposals, like the one by former President Dmitri Medvedev that we should sit down together to work on a new security architecture, were arrogantly ignored by the West. We are now seeing the results.

SPIEGEL: The Ukraine conflict is a personal one for you — and not just for political reasons.

Gorbachev: That is correct, and anything else would be strange. I am, after all, half Ukrainian. My mother was Ukrainian and my wife Raisa was too. I spoke my very first words in Ukrainian, and the first songs I heard were Ukrainian. The southern Russian region of Stavropol, where I come from and where I once served as party chief, had a partnership during Soviet times with Ukraine’s Donetsk region, where this terrible war is raging today. Back then we offered each other mutual help. We were friends and we lived in one state. Still, even today I have friends and relatives in Ukraine — as do most Russians.

SPIEGEL: As general secretary of the Communist Party, you fought for glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) in your country. Has everything that you pushed for during your political life fallen into ruin under Putin?

Gorbachev: I take an entirely different view. Glasnost isn’t dead and neither is democracy. A new generation has grown up in Russia under entirely different conditions — and it is much freer than in the Soviet Union. The clock can no longer be turned back. Nothing has fallen into ruin.

Read more » SPIEGEL ONLINE INTERNATIONAL
See more » http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/gorbachev-warns-of-decline-in-russian-western-ties-over-ukraine-a-1012992.html

PM praises Pakistani scientist who played key role in discovery of gravitational waves

By Abdul Manan

 

ISLAMABAD: Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has felicitated Dr Nergis Mavalvala, the Pakistani-American Astrophysicist, for being part of the team of scientists who have recently detected gravitational waves in space.

In a statement on Monday, the prime minister said Mavalvala, who is also a professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is a source of inspiration for Pakistani scientists and students aspiring to become future scientists.

Read more » The Express Tribune
See more » http://tribune.com.pk/story/1047451/pm-congratulates-pakistani-who-played-part-in-discovery-of-gravitational-waves/

‘Stalin’s Daughter,’ by Rosemary Sullivan

BY 

A young princess walks the corridors of an ancient palace, surrounded by adoring relatives, governesses and tutors. Her father is a beloved ruler of a vast country, and she is his only daughter and favorite child, his “little sparrow,” his “little fly.” She brings him presents of violets and strawberries, and he pets her, showering her in bristly kisses redolent of tobacco. She spends idyllic summers at the family dacha, where her father’s merry friends, whom she calls “aunts” and “uncles,” come on visits and regale her with stories and songs. The world she inhabits seems magical to her, “that place of sunshine.”

Read more  » The New York Times
See more » http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/14/books/review/stalins-daughter-by-rosemary-sullivan.html?smid=fb-share&_r=0

First Corbyn, now Sanders: how young voters’ despair is fuelling movements on the left

On both sides of the Atlantic, economic insecurity is fuelling the rise of new movements on the left

By Owen Jones

He’s the septuagenarian powered by youth. The figures behind Bernie Sanders’ triumph in Iowa – in which his grassroots insurgency scored a virtual tie against what he rightly described as “the most powerful political organisation” in the US – are astonishing. Among Iowa Democrats aged between 17 and 29, 84% opted for this unlikely youth icon; among those aged 30-44, Sanders still had a 21-point lead over Hillary Clinton. It was older Americans who flocked to Clinton’s camp: nearly seven out of 10 of those aged over 65. The generations appeared separated by a political chasm.

Read more » The Guardian
See more » http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/feb/04/jeremy-corbyn-bernie-sanders-young-voters-left?CMP=share_btn_tw

 

The revolution that never happened

BY ARIEB AZHAR

The law of resistance is a strange phenomenon of nature – a sapling growing against the weight of hard earth; an animal growing stronger in a hostile environment; the will of life to survive in the face of impending death. Perhaps, this can explain the romance and optimism that many of us felt during the repressive regime of General Ziaul Haq in the 1980s of Pakistan.

We had shifted from Rawalpindi to Karachi when I was five years old. My father, Aslam Azhar, had already established PTV in Pakistan, and had been transferred to the State Film Authority by Z A. Bhutto, who found his ideas too independent. When Ziaul Haq came to power he sacked all progressive minded professionals from government institutions, including my father. I vividly remember the solemn atmosphere in our house when Bhutto was hanged in Central Jail Rawalpindi a few years later.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1045345

“I don’t really think Jinnah is anyone’s hero”

By 

Author and journalist Mohammed Hanif speaks his mind about how the idea of a hero is conceived in our society

The News on Sunday: Nations tend to pick their heroes. How important are heroes for nation-building? What goes into the making of a hero?

Mohammed Hanif: I don’t know if heroes are important for nation building or not. All I know is that we have had too many heroes lately, we are fast running out of honours, medals, and clichés to bestow upon them. It seems you have to get gang raped, get shot in the head, or die at the hands of a state-employed torturer to become a hero. Why can’t we just have people who turn up for work? Why can’t we just stop thinking that we are god’s gift to this universe?

TNS: Why can’t we agree on our heroes — Jinnah or Maududi, Hakimullah or Malala? And then, each side claims its hero defines the national narrative.

MH: I don’t think there are many nations which agree on their heroes. I don’t really think Jinnah is anyone’s hero. I think a lot of people in this country don’t even know who he was and the ones who know will never agree what he said let alone what he meant by what he said. I don’t think there are many people who are going to consider anybody a hero who says: get disciplined, work hard, stand united. Sounds like your PT teacher, doesn’t really inspire anyone. Now if someone comes along and says let’s fight to liberate the Ummah, let’s go and take over the world or die trying, there is more to life than office slavery, that is the kind of stuff we expect our heroes to say. And can the national press stop using the term national narrative? Any editor who can achieve that will be my hero.

Read more » The News
See more » http://tns.thenews.com.pk/someone-never-stepped-punjab-cantonment-likely-believe-army-non-controversial-hero/#.Vn2FofkrLcs

Prescription from Pakistan: How one hospital is a model for Asia

Pakistan’s dismal public health system is rife with mismanagement and a paucity of resources.

Amidst this shambolic system, one hospital in Karachi has been providing specialised healthcare to millions.

Free of charge.

As the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation celebrated 40 years of successful service, Dr Sanjay Nagral visited the facility and met the man who helms it, armed with the simple philosophy that ‘No person should die only because they are unable to afford medical expenses.’

Read more » Rediff News
See more » http://www.rediff.com/news/special/prescription-from-pakistan-how-one-hospital-is-a-model-for-asia/20151224.htm

US govts prefer to deal with military regimes in Pakistan: Hina Rabbani Khar

BY DAWN.COM 

Former Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar defended Pakistan’s civilian leadership and her government’s role in the country’s disrupted democratic process, saying that the US government’s preference of dealing with military regimes has resulted in the pre-eminence of military influence in Pakistan.

“The US government has had a long history of immense fascination with the military of Pakistan,” Khar asserted in an interview with Mehdi Hasan on Al Jazeera’s ‘Head to Head’.

Despite being pushed on this point, Khar refused to concede that the Pakistani military “runs the show”, though she admitted that the “military has historically played a much a larger role than the Constitution should permit”.

The US, she said, was complicit in causing a constant disruption in Pakistan’s democratic process by propping up one military dictatorship after another.

“When Ziaul Haq came in, when Musharraf came in, Pakistan got the best possible military and civil assistance ever possible,” she remarked.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1227439/us-govts-prefer-to-deal-with-military-regimes-in-pakistan-hina-rabbani-khar?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+dawn-news+%28Dawn+News%29&utm_content=FaceBook

Pakistan’s Muniba Mazari named goodwill ambassador by UN Women

BY IRFAN HAIDER

ISLAMABAD: UN Women, the United Nations entity for gender equality and the empowerment of women, named Muniba Mazari as Pakistan’s first female goodwill ambassador to advance gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls.

As the goodwill ambassador for UN Women Pakistan, Muniba will dedicate her efforts towards the empowerment of women and girls, and would serve as an advocate for UN Women’s “Planet 50-50 by 2030: Step It Up for Gender Equality” and other campaigns.

Muniba Mazari is a writer, artist, singer, activist and a motivational speaker. She is also a paraplegic, having lost control of both legs in a car accident.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1225483

Two Daily Times columnists told to stop contributing

ISLAMABAD: Two columnists writing for Daily Times have been asked their columns will not be published in future as they ‘come under scrutiny.’
Mir Mohammad Ali Talpur who wrote a weekly column on Balochistan-related issues and Mohammad Taqi have both been told to stop writing for the paper. Talpur said in a Facebook post: “Today I was informed that they will not carry my pieces any more as these ‘come under scrutiny’…. in other words are unacceptable to the authorities. ”
He said the struggle to present truth will continue.  “Truth will Prevail. The Forces of Darkness will be Defeated.”
He credited Daily Times editor Rashed Rehman for publishing without editing whatever he wrote.
Meanwhile  Rashed Rehman has reportedly submitted his resignation.

Courtesy: Journalism Pakistan
Read more » http://www.journalismpakistan.com/news-detail.php?newsid=2669

Today, I wish Pakistan and India could be more like Canada

Dear Pakistan and India,

Today was a beautiful day in Canada. The sun was shining bright, and it was a warm day in the cold month of November. The temperature in my city was 20 degrees centigrade. Warmer still were the temperatures of hearts in Ottawa where our new handsome Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, whom you loved when he relished biryani in a mosque or performed bhangra with the desi community, was taking the oath of office along with 30 other ministers. Half of these ministers are women.

A 12-year-old boy from the indigenous aboriginal community led Trudeau to the ceremonial hall. The ceremony began by paying tribute to the Algonquin community on whose territory they were standing. Two indigenous ministers were sworn in. Acknowledging the centuries old injustices to the indigenous people, one of them was named minister of justice.

Today was the first time in Canada that a Muslim minister was sworn in, and that too a woman, who came here as a refugee with her widowed mother and sisters after fleeing war-torn Afghanistan.

There are three South Asians taken in as ministers. One of them holds the coveted position of minister of defence. Another was a bus driver before he came into politics. Two individuals with disabilities, one with impaired vision and another on wheel chair also became ministers. Yet another one of the minister’s parents worked as immigrant factory workers all their lives. A doctor became the health minister, and a university scientist became the minister of science. A new portfolio of immigration, citizenship and refugees was created.

An incredible step has been taken towards celebrating diversity today. The world has been watching Justin Trudeau with awe.

And yes, our premier (chief minister) of Ontario is a gay woman who is a grandmother and says family comes first.

But why am I writing this all down for you?

I was 24-years-old when, as an Indian, I married a Pakistani, and embraced my Pakistani-Indian status. I know some people would frown and wonder how that could work, but I have loved every minute of my marriage. It has been 25 years since then. But that’s another conversation.

In contrast to that, I have been a Canadian for only five years, yet I feel safer here than back home.

Sitting here, witnessing diversity unfold its virtues in Canada, my heart weeps for the havoc that has been created by ‘otherising’ and demonising diversity in India and Pakistan.

From the persecution of Ahmadis, to the killings of Shia youth, to burning Christians, to forced conversions of Hindus, to the recurrent Hindu-Muslim communal riots, to the lynching of Muslims for eating beef, to the burning of low caste children, with every new tragedy a little of Pakistani-Indian dies within me.

The unending arguments of how different Indians and Pakistanis are, despite sharing the same history, same geography, same ethnicity and even the same genetic pool, looks more ridiculous when you watch different skin colours and different ethnicities stand together in peace at the swearing in ceremony in Ottawa.

Read more » The Express Tribune
See more » http://blogs.tribune.com.pk/story/30132/today-i-wish-pakistan-and-india-could-be-more-like-canada/

Behind the scenes with Justin Trudeau on his 1st day as PM

CBC’s Peter Mansbridge shares unprecedented access as the new prime minister takes office

By Peter Mansbridge, CBC News

In a private moment hours before becoming Canada’s 23rd prime minister, Justin Trudeau was climbing the stairs in an empty Parliament Building, holding his two eldest children by the hands, when he made an unscheduled stop in a hallway holding the portraits of former prime ministers.

“Who is that?” Trudeau asked his son and daughter.

“Grandpapa,” Ella-Grace sings.

“That’s Grandpapa Pierre,” Trudeau told his children. “Today, he’ll be thinking of us and we’ll be thinking of him.”

He quickly raised a hand to caress the frame around his father’s portrait before abruptly announcing, “OK. Let’s go.”

It would have been impossible for Pierre Trudeau not to have played some role in Wednesday’s swearing-in spectacle.

Over the several hours Justin Trudeau spent in front of a camera and tethered to a microphone for a documentary by CBC’s The National, it is clear memories of his father were threaded through his thoughts.

Pierre Trudeau wasn’t just waiting for him in the hallway leading to the House of Commons. The memories of his dad were waiting for him in his new office. They had to be outside of 24 Sussex Drive when Trudeau pulled up in front of the empty executive mansion for the first time in years.
What was Trudeau thinking as the armoured sedan wound around the drive of his old home?

“This is weird,” was all he would offer.

Read more » CBC
See more » http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/behind-the-scenes-with-justin-trudeau-on-his-1st-day-as-pm-1.3304860

Shahrukh lives in India, but his soul is in Pakistan – BJP leader

BJP leader Vijayvargiya attacks Shah Rukh Khan, says his soul in Pakistan

By PTI 

NEW DELHI: Senior BJP leader Kailash Vijayvargiya on Tuesday attacked Bollywood superstar Shah Rukh Khan over his “extreme intolerance” comment, saying his “soul” is in Pakistan though he lives in India and also painted him as an “anti-nationalist”.

The comments by Vijayvargiya, a BJP general secretary and a former state minister, came notwithstanding the refrain of top BJP leaders in the recent weeks that insensitive comments should be avoided by partymen. Vijayvargiya is one of the party strategists for the Bihar assembly elections.

READ ALSO:
SRK says there’s “extreme intolerance” in country

“Shah Rukh lives in India, but his soul is in Pakistan. His films make crores here but he still thinks India to be intolerant,” he said in a series of tweets amid mounting concerns over the “climate of intolerance” in the country.

Read more » The Times of India
See more » http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/BJP-leader-Vijayvargiya-attacks-Shah-Rukh-Khan-says-his-soul-in-Pakistan/articleshow/49649200.cms?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=TOI

More » DAWN
http://www.dawn.com/news/1217428/

India’s Arundhati Roy returns National Award

BY DAWN.COM

NEW DELHI: Renowned South Asian writer Arundhati Roy on Thursday issued a statement explaining her decision to return the 1989 National Award she received for Best Screenplay, saying, “I want to make it clear that I am not returning this award because I am ‘shocked’ by what is being called the ‘growing intolerance’ being fostered by the present government.”

She goes on to clarify her statement: “‘Intolerance’ is the wrong word to use for the lynching, shooting, burning and mass murder of fellow human beings.

“I cannot claim to be shocked by what has happened after this government was enthusiastically voted into office with an overwhelming majority,” she says.

“These horrific murders are only a symptom of a deeper malaise. Life is hell for the living too. Whole populations ─ millions of Dalits, Adivasis, Muslims and Christians are being forced to live in terror, unsure of when and from where the assault will come,” Roy says.

The writer says, “When the thugs and apparatchiks of the New Order talk of ‘illegal slaughter’ they mean the imaginary cow that was killed ─ not the real man that was murdered. When they talk of taking ‘evidence for forensic examination’ from the scene of the crime, they mean the food in the fridge, not the body of the lynched man,” ─ an apparent reference to the recent Dadri lynching incident where a Muslim man was killed and his son injured after a mob beat them for keeping ‘beef’ in their fridge.

Roy also touches upon a recent incident of caste-motivated violence: “When Dalits are butchered and their children burned alive, which writer today can freely say, like Babasaheb Ambedkar once did that ‘To the Untouchables, Hinduism is a veritable chamber of horrors,’ (Babasaheb Ambedkar Writings and Speeches, Volume 9 pg 296) without getting attacked, lynched, shot or jailed?”

She laments the loss of the right to speak freely: “It doesn’t matter whether we agree or disagree with what is being said. If we do not have the right to speak freely we will turn into a society that suffers from intellectual malnutrition, a nation of fools.”

Roy says New India has “enthusiastically joined” the race to the bottom prevalent across the subcontinent.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1217636

The World’s Most Powerful People 2015

By David M. Ewalt

Excerpt:

Russian President Vladimir Putin emerged as the world’s most powerful person for the third year running. Putin continues to prove he’s one of the few men in the world powerful enough to do what he wants –and get away with it. International sanctions set in place after he seized Crimea and waged war-by-proxy in Ukraine have kneecapped the Ruble and driven Russia into deepening recession, but haven’t hurt Putin one bit: In June his approval ratings reached an all-time high of 89%. In October, he bombed ISIS forces in Syria and then met face-to-face with President Assad, making the U.S and NATO look weak in the region, and helping rebuild Russian influence abroad.

Read more » Forbes
See more » http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidewalt/2015/11/04/the-worlds-most-powerful-people-2015/

Bill Gates: Only Socialism Can Save the Climate, ‘The Private Sector is Inept’

By 

Bill Gates explains why the climate crisis will not be solved by the free market.

In a recent interview with The Atlantic, billionaire tech magnate Bill Gates announced his game plan to spend $2 billion of his own wealth on green energy investments, and called on his fellow private sector billionaires to help make the U.S. fossil-free by 2050. But in doing so, Gates admitted that the private sector is too selfish and inefficient to do the work on its own, and that mitigating climate change would be impossible without the help of government research and development.

“There’s no fortune to be made. Even if you have a new energy source that costs the same as today’s and emits no CO2, it will be uncertain compared with what’s tried-and-true and already operating at unbelievable scale and has gotten through all the regulatory problems,” Gates said. “Without a substantial carbon tax, there’s no incentive for innovators or plant buyers to switch.”

Gates even tacked to the left and uttered words that few other billionaire investors would dare to say: government R&D is far more effective and efficient than anything the private sector could do.

“Since World War II, U.S.-government R&D has defined the state of the art in almost every area,” Gates said. “The private sector is in general inept.”

Read more » U.S. Uncut
See more » http://usuncut.com/climate/bill-gates-only-socialism-can-save-us-from-climate-change/

Justin Trudeau: Bringing old Canada back

BY MARIA KARI

“Sunny ways, my friend. Sunny ways. This is what positive politics can do.” — Justin Trudeau

On November 4, Justin Trudeau will be officially sworn in as the Prime Minister of Canada, following a landslide victory at the largest elections turnout in 20 years.

Trudeau is a legacy child taking over as agent of change for his father Pierre Trudeau, the 15th Prime Minister, who also happens to have ushered in one of Canada’s most glorious periods. Within days of being elected, Trudeau Jr. has already begun to undo almost 10 years worth of damage left in the wake of the previous (toxic) government.

But it seems that Trudeau has captured the world’s attention not because of his political prowess but because the 43-year-old also happens to be ‘super hot’.

In fact, it seems that as of last week, the planet simply can’t stop ogling our prime minister.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1215721

Trudeaumania: Will Canada’s new PM undo damage of Harperism?

By Hadani Ditmars

Like millions of Canadians, I allowed myself to bask in the warm after-glow of our recent federal election – one that saw the triumph of 43 year-old Justin Trudeau and the end of the Harper era.

Who could have resisted the image of the telegenic and triumphant young Trudeau, radiating warmth and humanity – qualities sorely lacking in ex-Prime Minister Stephen Harper- as he strode on-stage to make his victory speech.

Mere weeks earlier, it looked like Harper’s politics of fear and division – his odd but apparently vote garnering insistence on making the wearing of the niqab an election issue, his government’s establishment of a“hotline” to report “barbaric cultural practices” and his call for stripping dual citizens convicted of terrorist acts of their Canadian citizenship – were going to usher in another Conservative government. But October 19th’s victory speech was all about inclusiveness and diversity.

Trudeau spoke of “real change” and invoked the ghost of Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier citing his comment on“sunny ways” over divisive politics. He reached out to First Nations Communities – who just enjoyed a precedent setting election of 10 members of parliament- and to Muslim Canadians – who had been targeted by Harper under Islamophobic “anti-terror” policies. He even held out an olive branch to Conservatives – who had targeted him in “attack ads”, calling them “our neighbors”, “not our enemies.”

His statements that “Canada was built by people from all corners of the world, all cultures and all faiths” – and“our enviable inclusive society didn’t happen by accident”– recalled the multiculturalist policies of his father Pierre. These were policies that ushered in an era of internationalism and diversity and one that earned Canada a global reputation as a place where human rights were upheld at home and abroad.

Read more » RT
See more » https://www.rt.com/op-edge/319487-canada-elections-justin-trudeau/