Tag Archives: Sindhi Language

Sindhi turns out to be second language of Pakistan

Sindhi 2Sindhi remains the second-most widely spoken language in Pakistan, according to MoveHub, a website for people looking to move abroad.

To facilitate people thinking of moving abroad, the website has come up with a map of the world where the names of countries are replaced with their ‘second languages’. While in most cases this shows the effects of colonialism and cultural imperialism, in the case of Pakistan, it reflects post-independence policymaking.

Sindhi is a regional language spoken which is not widely spoken outside of Sindh province, somewhat similar to Punjabi – the first language – which is mostly used in Punjab province.

Incidentally, Pakistan is one of the few countries where the official language is not the first or even the second language. The official language is Urdu.

Pakistan’s regional languages face looming extinction

An Indo-Aryan language, Sindhi is spoken in both India and Pakistan, with some 75 million native speakers around the world. It is the official language of Sindh province of Pakistan and is recognised by India as one of its scheduled languages.

Read more » The Express Tribune
See more >> https://tribune.com.pk/story/1324502/sindhi-turns-second-language-pakistan/

Dialects of Sindhi language

These are the major dialects of Sindhi Language. The language is the same but their is a slight difference in words or way of speaking. Their are several other dialects of Sindhi language too (like Memoni) but they are not spoken by a big population.

Futher information about the Dialects:

1. Laasi – It is spoken by around 1 million people in Parts of Lasbela, Balochistan and Sindh.

2. Larri – It is spoken by over 2 million people, in Thatto, Sujawal and Tando.

3. Kutchhi, it is spoken by around 2 million people in Pakistan and 2 million in India too. Their is a hug Kutchhi population in Karachi, Sindh. The language bears more grammatical similarity with Sindhi and lexical similarity with Gujarati.

4. Thari or Thareli or (Ddaaddki): it is language of the people of Thar. Spoken on both side of border by over 6-7 million. It is a bit influenced by Rajasthani languages.

5. Vicholi: It is spoken by a huge population of Sindhis. It is spoken mostly in Hyderabad region. Over 11 million people speak this dialect.

6. Siroli: It is spoken by a large Number of people in Upper Sindh, Larkano and Sukkur region, but also in parts of Balochistan and RahimYarKhan (Punjab). It is influenced by Seraiki. It is spoke by over 11 million people. In Balochistan it is known as Firaqi Sindhi, with around 1 million speakers.

* In Karachi the situation is different and Sindhi is more influenced by Urdu, and all dialects mix up. While in rural Karachi people usually speak Laasi or Larri. The total number of Sindhi speakers worldwide is impossible to know as Census of Pakistan and India are politically influenced. According to famous Pakistani demographers the population of Sindh is usually 15-20% shown lesser than it actually is. The total number of Sindhis worldwide is over 40 million, out of which 80% live in Sindh, Pakistan. All the Memon’s and even those that came in 1947 are actually Sindhis by ancestry, their origin is from Thatto. Sindhis in India make up around 6-7 million of the population and while Sindhis in other countries make up around 1.5 million to 2 million, out of which 60% are Indian, and remaining Pakistani Diaspora, but the Pakistani Sindhi diaspora is growing at a faster rate*

Courtesy: Source of above material: Explore the Beauty of Sindh

– – – – –

Other than that there are some more branches of the Dialects of Sindhi language

1- Lahinda لهندا معنا اولهندي واري زبان
2- Saraiki/ Jatki سرائڪي يا جتڪي
3- Kaytranni ڪيتراڻي جا لهندا سان مشابهت رکي ٿي
4- Ubhee اُڀي
5- Thareli/ ddaddki ٿريلي يا ڍاڍڪي
6- Mokakee موڪاڪي
7- Lorree chienee لوڙي چيني
8- Jadghhalee جدغالي
Reference: Janat-ul-Sindh book ريفرينس جنت السنڌ ڪتاب
Source: https://iaob.wordpress.com/2016/05/02/dialects-of-sindhi-language/

What is the original script of the Sindhi language: Devanagari or Arabic?

Today we write Sindhi in Arabic script, but is it true that the original script of Sindhi is Devanagari?

 

Answer:

By Arvind Iyengar, Professional Student in Linguistics

The short answer is: There is no clear answer to this question.

The answer to your question also depends on when you think the Sindhī language came into being, since languages change at a rapid rate.

The language of Shāh ʿAbdul Latīf Bhiṭṭāī (1689 – 1752 AD), the ‘national poet’ of Sindh, might be quite difficult to understand for a speaker of modern Sindhī. Therefore, can Shāh Latīf’s language be considered Sindhī?

That said, those driven by linguistic pride often claim (usually without proof) that the yet unknown language of the Indus Valley Civilisation was actually Sindhī, and therefore, the script used on the Indus Valley seals must be the original Sindhī script (even though no one knows what the symbols mean).

On similar lines, there might be those who claim that (depending on their ideology) either Arabic or Devanāgarī is the original script of Sindhī, again usually without proof.

A Sindhī translation of the Qurʾān and of the Mahābhārata are believed to have existed as far back as the 11th century (assuming of course that one can safely call this language Sindhī). Whether these were written in a Brāhmī-based script or an Arabic-based script is not clearly known (Brāhmī is the ancestor of the modern Devanāgarī script).

By the early 1800s, it has been attested by several authors, both Indian and European, that there were several different scripts in use for Sindhī, including Haṭavāṇikā (or Kẖudābādī), Gurmukhī and of course Devanāgarī and Arabic.

Continue reading What is the original script of the Sindhi language: Devanagari or Arabic?

Sindhi Language Authority

By Emily Hauze

On a bright November morning during my most recent stay in Sindh, my buddies (Inam and Naz) took me to a place I had long been wanting to visit: the Sindhi Language Authority in Hyderabad. And soon I will describe all the interesting things I found there. But I also hope to convey here some sense of what I find so extraordinary about the Sindhi language, and by extension, about the Sindhi people. I am still very far away from my goal of being a true speaker of Sindhi, but I am beginning to make progress. And as I gradually learn to navigate the landscape of the language, more of the inner character and spirit of Sindh is revealing itself to me.

I have been learning about Sindh for only four years, but noticed the unusually intense love among Sindhis for their language very early in that time. When I began to respond to my online friends using even the most basic Sindhi phrases of greeting or farewell, I was amazed at the fireworks of appreciation I received in return. Previously, when trying out a few Urdu phrases, I had also been greeted with surprise and joy — but there was something different and deeper-felt in the reactions to my attempts at Sindhi. And if that was true for my online interactions, how much more emotional and delighted were the responses when I came to utter some of my practiced phrases in Sindh, in person!

​This can be partly explained by the rarity of the situation, since it almost never happens that any non-Sindhi (especially a white Anglo type like myself) learns Sindhi in the first place. It is also unusual for a foreigner to learn Urdu, but not nearly so astonishing, because Hindi-Urdu after all is the language of Bollywood, which is enjoyed around the world. Meanwhile, the cultural treasures of the Sindhi language have not (yet) learned to export themselves so widely. Therefore it is rare a foreigner to encounter the language by chance, and to be drawn into it enough to learn even a phrase or two.

And yet, that is precisely what has happened to me–a chance encounter with a language and a culture, which has resulted in a lasting connection. I am not the first of these rare and lucky souls who discover Sindhi — the beloved Elsa Qazi and others have already blazed the trail — but perhaps I can help open the door for others who may similarly be enriched by it. The Sindhi love of the native language is, I believe, a contagious kind of joy, and the gentle, rolling sound of spoken Sindhi could bring a smile to even the least comprehending face.

Smiling at the sounds is not enough, of course. But learning to comprehend is no easy matter. The challenge is especially great for a non-Asian like myself, who must learn the entirety of the language from the beginning, having nearly no earlier contact with any aspect of its grammar, its alphabet, its phrase structure, its vocabulary, etc.

Continue reading Sindhi Language Authority

Google Translate adds 13 more languages for a total of 103

Now you can chat with people from Ethiopia and Kyrgyzstan.

By Mariella Moon , @mariella_moon

Google Translate could help connect even more people now that it’s added13 more languages to its roster. Those 13 are Amharic (Ethiopia), Corsican (Corsica island in France), Frisian (Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands), Kyrgyz (Kyrgyzstan), Hawaiian, Kurdish/Kurmanji (Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria), Luxembourgish, Samoan, Scots Gaelic, Shona (Zimbabwe), Sindhi (Pakistan), Pashto (Afghanistan) and Xhosa (South Africa). Google says all of Translate’s 103 available languages cover 99 percent of the online population.

Read more » Engadget
See more » http://www.engadget.com/2016/02/18/google-translate-adds-13-languages/

Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) gets a Sindhi chair, to launch certificate courses soon.

By PTI

NEW DELHI: The Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) has established a Sindhi chair for promotion of research in the language and will soon be offering certificate courses.
The varsity had earlier this week signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the National Council for Promotion of Sindhi Language (NCPSL) under the aegis of HRD Ministry to establish the Sindhi Chair at IGNOU headquarters in the capital.

Read more » The Economic Times
See more » http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/services/education/ignou-gets-a-sindhi-chair-to-launch-certificate-courses-soon/articleshow/49597797.cms

List of the National Languages of India

India has a diverse list of spoken languages among different groups of people. At least 800 different languages and around 2000 dialects have been identified. The Constitution of India has stipulated the usage of Hindi and English to be the twoofficial languages of communication for the national government. Additionally, it contains a list of 22 official languages(including Hindi and English). These languages are entitled to representation on the Official Language Commission, and a candidate in an examination conducted for national government service may opt to take the exam in any of these languages.

As drafted, English ceased to exist as an official language (on par with Hindi) in 1965, after which it was intended to continue as an “associate additional official language” until such time that a duly appointed committee can decide on a full-scale transition to Hindi, based on a periodic review. However, due to protests from South Indian states where there is low Hindi penetration, the “twin language” system is still in vogue. Due to rapid industrialization, and a bustling multinational influence in the economy, English continues to be a popular and influential means of communication in the government and day-to-day business, and moves to replace it have effectively been shelved.

Official languages

Two languages are the languages used by the central administration:

  1. Hindi is the language used by the Central Government when communicating with the states of Hindi Belt
  2. English is the Associate official language and the language to be used while communicating with the states.

A total of 22 languages are recognized by the Constitution of India:

  1. Assamese — official language of Assam
  2. Bengali — official language of Tripura and West Bengal
  3. Bodo — official language of Assam
  4. Dogri — official language of Jammu and Kashmir
  5. Gujarati — official language of Dadra and Nagar Haveli, Daman and Diu and Gujarat
  6. Hindi — official language of Arunachal Pradesh, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Bihar, Chandigarh, Chhattisgarh, Delhi, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh and Uttaranchal
  7. Kannada — official language of Karnataka
  8. Kashmiri — official language of Jammu and Kashmir
  9. Konkani — official language of Goa and Mangalore
  10. Malayalam — official language of Kerala and Lakshadweep
  11. Manipuri or Meithei — official language of Manipur
  12. Marathi — official language of Maharashtra
  13. Nepali — official language of Sikkim
  14. Oriya — official language of Orissa
  15. Punjabi — official language of Punjab and Chandigarh, second official language of Delhi and Haryana
  16. Sanskrit — language of Hinduism, required teaching in many schools
  17. Santali – language of the Santhal tribals of the Chota Nagpur Plateau (comprising the states of Jharkhand, Bihar, Orissa and Chattisgarh)
  18. Sindhi – language of the Sindhi community

  19. Tamil — official language of Tamil Nadu and Pondicherry
  20. Telugu — official language of Andhra Pradesh
  21. Urdu — official language of Jammu and Kashmir, Andhra Pradesh, Delhi and Uttar Pradesh

Read more » Axistranslations
See more » http://www.axistranslations.com/translation-article/national-lanuages-of-india-list.html

Indian Government suggests activities for promoting Sindhi language

New Delhi: The government has mooted the development of the e-learning curriculum in Sindhi and the uploading of rare books in the national e-library in an attempt to promote the language, an official statement said on Thursday.

The activities, suggested by Human Resource Development Minister Smriti Irani at the recently held meeting of the newly-reconstituted Governing Council of National Council for Promotion of Sindhi Language (NCPSL), would be undertaken for the language`s development.

Under the e-learning curriculum in Sindhi Language, a foundation course of the language would be provided free of cost. Also, the works of young and upcoming Sindhi writers would be published by the National Book Trust.

The books of new writers would be exhibited during the World Book Fair in 2016.

“A competition among young Sindhi knowing students will be conducted and the top three winners will be sent on a `Shodh Yatra` across the Asian continent.”

They would be accompanied by a writer and a historian to study the roots of Sindhi language, culture and its civilization. Their experiences in the form of books will also be published by the government,” a Human Resource Development Ministry statement said.

The meeting was attended by 21 members, who are eminent scholars of Sindhi language and culture.

The minister also suggested that one cultural club in major clusters of Sindhi speaking people would be made functional in which the younger generation would participate in activities like drama, poetry, writing, music and performing arts.

It was suggested that a national-level competition be held for these activities, and an award of Rs.1 lakh has been earmarked.

“It has also been decided to upload rare books of Sindhi language in the National E-Library and such rare books would also be published by the National Book Trust for circulation.”

The task of standardisation of prescribed text books for schools in Sindhi language using Devanagari script will be undertaken by the Central Institute of Indian Languages (CIIL),” it said.

A few important decisions taken in the meeting included an increase in the award money from Rs 1 lakh to Rs 5 lakh for the Lifetime Achievement Award presented to a Sindhi writer for his/her outstanding lifetime contribution in Sindhi literature.

There was also an increase in award money, from Rs 50,000 to Rs 1 lakh, for 10 eminent writers, recognising their contribution to the field of Sindhi literature, the statement said.

The increase in award money in all cases would be effective from 2014-15.

It was also decided in the meeting to provide Rs 1 crore for the establishment of a Sindhi chair in Maharishi Dayanand Saraswati University, Ajmer.

~ IANS

Courtesy: ZeeNews
S
ee more » http://zeenews.india.com/news/india/government-suggests-activities-for-promoting-sindhi-language_1548762.html

The Folktales of Sindh – An introduction – Words Without Borders

The Folklore and Literature Project, the forty-two-volume Sindhi folklore collection compiled by the scholar, philologist, and folklorist Nabi Bakhsh Khan Baloch (1917–2011) and published by the Sindhi Adabi Board, is one of the great treasures of world heritage. This literature spans the historic land of Sindh, home to the Indus Valley Civilization (3300–1300 BCE), situated in present-day Pakistan. It is likely that in the folktales preserved in the Sindhi language, we can find the structures and traces of the earliest stories from the Indus Valley Civilization

Baloch divided this literature into several broad categories: “Fables and fairy-tales; pseudo-historical romances; tales of historical nature; folk-poetry; folk songs; marriage songs; poems pertaining to wars and other events; riddles; proverbs; wit and humor; and folk customs.” Of this collection, seven volumes were dedicated to folktales: The Tales of Kings and Queens, Princes and Princesses (vol. 21), Tales of Kings, Viziers, and Merchants (vol. 22), Tales of Fairies, Giants, Magicians, and Witches (vol. 23), Tales of Kings, Money-lenders, Wise-Men, Thugs, and the Common People (vol. 24), Children’s Tales (vol. 25), Fables of Animals and Birds (vol. 26), and Even More Folktales (vol. 27).

Collected from both the oral tradition of the villagers and written records, the stories were gathered and compiled over five years from 1957 to 1961. A network of field workers stationed in each district transcribed the folktales from the oral accounts of villagers in different parts of Sindh. The field workers were instructed to transcribe the tales exactly as they heard them. At the compilation stage, different versions of the same tale were compared, the variants noted, and a final version prepared for publication. Where only a single version for a folktale was found, it was retained with minimum verbal modification necessary to make it readable.

Continue reading The Folktales of Sindh – An introduction – Words Without Borders

‘Shadow of One-Unit system still haunts Pakistan’

KARACHI: Sindhi writers and intellectuals are of the view that even 44 years after the abolition of the ‘One-Unit’ system, its shadow haunts Pakistan as all rights and resources of smaller provinces are still snatched by the federal government.

Pakistan is a multicultural country, which has been converted into a highly centralised authoritarian state. It is time to devolve powers to give autonomy to the provinces as enshrined in the Pakistan Resolution passed in 1940,” said Muslim Shamim, the president of the Anjuman Taraqqi Pasand Musanifeen.

Read more : The Express Tribune, April 7th, 2014.
http://tribune.com.pk/story/692181/book-launch-shadow-of-one-unit-system-still-haunts-pakistan/

 

Pakistan’s Prime Minister Tells Foreign Affairs Committee He Would Welcome Voice of America in Sindhi

ShermanWashington, D.C. – At a meeting between the House Foreign Affairs Committee and Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif on Tuesday, October 22, 2013, Congressman Brad Sherman (D-CA) raised the prospect of a Voice of America broadcast into Pakistan in the Sindhi language.

In response to Sherman’s question, Prime Minister Sharif said, “I would welcome it.” The Prime Minister went on to list efforts of his own government to communicate in the Sindhi language.

Sherman, a senior member of the Foreign Affairs Committee, is the chair of the Congressional Sindh Caucus.

“The response from the Sindhi community in Pakistan to U.S. public diplomacy in their language has been overwhelmingly positive,” said Sherman. “The Prime Minister of Pakistan welcomes this outreach.”

In a Foreign Affairs Committee markup on July 21, 2011, Sherman offered an amendment to the Foreign Relations Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012. The amendment required that, of the funds made available to Voice of America, $1.5 million be used only for Sindhi language programming. The Committee considered and unanimously approved Sherman’s amendment. However, that bill never became law.

Courtesy: via Sapac Sindh + Sindhi e-groups/ e-lists, October 25, 2013

Sindhi population under attack by Pak govt bodies: US lawmakers

Brad ShermanWashington: With the popularity of the United States inside Pakistan at an all-time low, an influential American lawmaker has asked the State Department to make efforts to reach out directly to the country’s population, in particular the Sindhis.

“Pakistan is a nuclear-armed Islamic state on the front line of several conflicts with so many extremist groups.

Pakistan is a pressing international problem for us. My hope is that you are reaching out to the Pakistani people not just in Urdu, which is the politically correct language that the government and the ISI in Pakistan would have you use, but also in the other languages, particularly Sindhi,” Congressman Brad Sherman, said during a Congressional hearing Thursday.

Sherman alleged that the people of Sindhi, predominantly those who speak Sindhi language, have been under attack by governmental bodies.

“That’s why the government of Pakistan would just as soon you not use that language. They’re so helpful in so many ways that perhaps you might want to ignore their advice,” he said.

“The US must reach out to Sindh, where the Sindhi language is spoken by more people than Urdu,” Sherman said in his remarks at the hearing of the Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade Subcommittee of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

Courtesy: The Indian Express

 http://www.indianexpress.com/news/sindhi-population-under-attack-by-pak-govt-bodies-us-lawmakers/983254/

Sindhi version of US Consulate website, Karachi

Brad Sherman
Hon. Congressman Brad Sherman

Hon. Congressman Brad Sherman, Hon. Congressman Adam Schiff, and Hon. Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney have signed the letter to have the State Department produce a version of the website of the U.S. Consulate in Karachi in the Sindhi language. They have sent the letter below to Honorable Secretary John Kerry”:

Dear Secretary Kerry,

We write to respectfully request that the State Department produce a version of the website of the U.S. Consulate in Karachi in the Sindhi language. This modest goal has the potential for enormous benefits for the United States’ diplomacy efforts in Pakistan. The response from the Sindhi population, including Sindhi journalists and intellectuals, to previous U.S. outreach in their language has been extraordinarily positive.

The Sindh province is home to tens of millions of speakers of Sindhi, which is spoken by at least 12% of Pakistanis and has more native speakers than the national language of Urdu. The translated website will serve as an important source of news and understanding of U.S. policy in Pakistan for a large segment of the population.

It is in America’s national interests to reach out to this historically marginalized segment of the Pakistani population in their native language. Sindhis in Pakistan help advance U.S. interests in the region by opposing extremism and violence. Many Sindhis, highly influenced by rich Sufi traditions, share our core values and seek our help in a more secure and safe world. We strongly support the translation of the U.S. Consulate website in Karachi to Sindhi.

Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Courtesy: Sindhi e-lists/ e-groups, SAPAC and Social Media

Link to Sindhi editor or Sindhi Navees

by Abdul-Majid Bhurgri

I am updating the Sindhi Editor. Until now it could only be used on Internet Explorer and on Windows OS. But now it can be used in all browsers and all operating systems. I have tested it in Firefox, Safari, Opera and also in Mac OSX and Linux Ubuntu OS. It is now browser and platform independent. I have also included a click-able on screen keyboard. I hope this will be more useful for Sindhi writers and users.

Link to Sindhi editor or Sindhi Navees

www.bhurgri.com

Time to implement the Sindhi language bill

by Dr. Prof. Gul Agha

Sindhi is the sole official language of Sindh. It is time to implement the law — all officials in Sindh must be proficient in speaking, reading and writing Sindhi. All official versions of documents must be in Sindhi. All interviews and entrance exams, provincial Civil Service exams must be in Sindhi.

Continue reading Time to implement the Sindhi language bill

India : Promote & propagate Sindhi Culture

Need of the day for Sindhis in India – Promote & propagate Sindhi Vocal Culture

By Chand .P,  forwarded by Asha Chand

The sole aim and goal of Sindhi Sangat is the promotion of Sindhi language, culture and heritage. The declining interest of the community in their own Sindhi culture, especially in the younger generation, is a matter of great concern. We feel that with greater emphasis on the use of modern electronic/visual media, we can hope to reverse this trend and promote vocal culture more emphatically. Sindhi Sangat is making a small contribution in this direction to put the above concept into action.

We launched “SINDHI SURHAAN” in 2007, a 30 min TV slot on Doordarshan. We have been producing high quality Sindhi Telefilms and other mixed TV episodes. We continue to telecast Sindhi Surhaan today from satellite TV Channels – DD Girnar (formerly called DD Gujarati) and DD India. Both the satellite TV channels can be viewed all over India . DD India has foot prints in 146 countries in the world.

Sindhi Telefilms have been also released as DVDs to reach out Sindhis worldwide. We have especially added subtitles in English, so that the telefilms also become the source of improving and polishing one’s knowledge of the language.

Continue reading India : Promote & propagate Sindhi Culture

India : Asha Chand’s Letter to Doordarshan – Don’t erase Sindhi from consciousness

Asha Chand’s Letter to Doordarshan On — Mile Sur Mera Tumhara issue

Asha Chand

As most of you know, there was yet another attempt to belittle the Sindhi community recently. This time, by conveniently scraping the Sindhi line in the new revised and modern version of Mile Sur Mera Tumhara

Lot of efforts are being made to bring back the Sindhi line in the above, but the entire community needs to take this as a personal project. Send emails to the producer of the song, Kailash Surendranath, tkpc@vsnl.com

Respect yourself. Respect your identity. Promote Sindhi

For those keen on knowing the entire background… Read on

31 Jan -2010

Asha Chand’s Letter to Doordarshan On — Mile Sur Mera Tumhara issue

Sindhi community stands severely shocked and distressed to see the Doordarshan has removed the Sindhi line from the song “ Miley Sur Mera Tumhara, to sur bane Hamara” which was in the original version of the song. This song was played on many channels on 26th January 2010.

Sindhis form an integral part of India . Truthfully speaking Sindhi community probably made the largest sacrifice during the independence by giving full of their land, whereas communities like Bangalis, Punjabis gave part of the land & therefore Sindhis who have contributed richly to India , feel that their contribution has been discounted by this unfortunate event. Hence we write this and urge you to please take remedial steps immediately to re-instate the Sindhi line in the song & promote the original version of the song.

Continue reading India : Asha Chand’s Letter to Doordarshan – Don’t erase Sindhi from consciousness

Sindhi language has not been given its historical status in Pakistan

Islamabad establishment is continuously denying the historical status of Sindhi language in Pakistan

By Shakeel Nizamani, Calgary, Alberta
Trudeau, the 15th Prime Minster of Canada, was a charismatic, bold and brilliant leader. He as a prime minister made it compulsory for bureaucrats to learn French not only in the Quebec province but in all of Canada. He said something like this “you have a choice not to learn French and we don’t have to hire you as a civil/military/govt  servant.” While Sindhi language has not been given its historical status in Pakistan but at the same time it is continuously denied in its own homeland Sindh.

Cops learn Sindhi language in India

Cops learn Sindhi to bridge communication gap
Saturday, April 11, 2009 at 12:39:10 PM
by Alka Joshi, Mumbai
Courtesy: MumbaiPulses
In an attempt to reduce communication gap, police personnel from Ulhasnagar, Ambernath and Badlapur are learning Sindhi. The classes that started sometime back now have 40 students from seven police stations of Zone IV, crime branch and the traffic police.

Continue reading Cops learn Sindhi language in India

Proud on Sindhi Topi and Ajrak

LONDON, DECEMBER 2, 2009. World Sindhi Congress expressed its full support and intended participation in “Sindhi Topi and Ajrak Day” (Sindhi Cap and Scarf Wearing Day) being celebrated all over the world on December 6th, 2009. International cultural get-togethers are already planned in London, Manchester, Bristol and Scotland as well as in New York.

Sindh, currently within the geo-political boundaries of Pakistan and homeland to 35 million Sindhi people, has an aboundingly rich culture, heritage and language dating back thousands of years. Since its inclusion in Pakistan, six decades ago, the indigenous people of Sindh have suffered systematic and institutionalized marginalization of their language and culture.

Continue reading Proud on Sindhi Topi and Ajrak

Monitoring teaching of Sindhi in Sindh

by Khalid Hashmani, McLean, Virginia, USA

During an informal meeting with the Minister of Education for Sindh (Pir Mazhar-ul-Haq), the question of non-compliance of private schools to teach Sindhi in the schools of Sindh was also raised. The Minister confirmed that the teaching of Salees Sindhi and Salees Urdu are mandatory in the schools of Sindh. He also said that people should report any cases of non-compliance of this rule promptly and the Ministry will take appropriate action against them immediately. The Minister further said that if any one has verifiable reports that any school in Sindh is not teaching at the minimum of Salees Sindhi, they should either call him or or the Secretary of Education Sindh, MR. Rizwan Memon or they can also report via email to secy.edu@sindh.gov.pk. Let us see if the present Government is serious about ensuring that current laws of Sindh with respect to the use and teaching of the Sindhi language are enforced.

Those interested in monitoring and assessing the effectiveness of various education programs of the Sindh education ministry are advised to visit Ministry’s web site and share their views and critique. The Ministry URL is: http://www.sindh. gov.pk/dpt/ EducationFinal/ index.htm

Introduction to a modern way to learn Sindhi

Report by: Asha Chand, Dubai

Watch this Saturday 15 -16 Aug 2009 On DD Girnar (formerly DD Gujarati) at 8:30 PM DUBAI time and 10:00 PM IST Dish TV # 872 – Tata Sky 871 *Variety Programme * 1st Lesson to “Let ‘ s Learn Sindhi” Introduction to a modern way learning Sindhi and wonderful Sindhi Songs by Renu Gidoomal, Barkat Ali & Najaf Ali, Talaash,  Sindhi Telefilm, Jokes by Ashok Sundrani Sponsors: Petrotech, Lal ‘ s Insurance Brokers Ltd, K.M Garage, Sindhi Ceremonial Centre & Sindhi Guru Darbar – Dubai.

GAURDING SINDHI LANGUAGE

aliakbardhakanBy: Dr. Ali Akbar Dhakan, Karachi, Sindh

The writer can be reached at – drdhakansindheconomist@hotmail.com

We Sindhis have sacrificed a lot as we have lost many political leaders since partition… Every language has its own importance and status in every country. We feel pride if we speak Punjabi in Punjab, Pushto in Pakhtunkhawah, Siraiki in Multan and surrounding areas, Balochi in Balochistan and Sindhi in our own motherland. But we being Sindhi speaking in Sindh, have not been so careful to save our own language even in our own motherland, not only outsiders have neglected, but even our own Sindhis, have neglected speaking Sindhi language in the right dialect and pronunciation. The aged Sindhis born before Pakistan, speak Sindhi somewhat in its proper dialect but sorry to say with greater grief and sadness that even we being elders of our families have never given attention towards our generations and future children to speak in proper pronunciation and according to the alphabet as the new born children particularly born in the big cities of Sindh like Karachi, Hyderabad and other big towns, I have not learnt the right dialect of the Sindhi language because of being spoken generally Urdu/Hindi and English in the elite families of Sindhis. It is not common in these homes where the mothers of our children are non-sindhis and do not speak the Sindhi language, they do not try to let their children speak in Sindhi. Most of our elite Sindhis families themselves do not allow their children to talk in their own language and therefore avoid speaking their own language. I have an example of Dr. Shamshad Akhtar, the Former Governor State Bank of Pakistan who used to say that she hated to speak in Sindhi even being the daughter of an old bureaucrat of Sindh. Even Mr.A.G.N Kazi, former Governor State Bank of Paksitan did not talk to me deliberately in Sindhi when I used to talk to him in Sindhi. When he was requested to preside over a conference on Shah Abdul Lateef Bhittai arranged by Sindhi Officers’ Union in State Bank, Mr. Kazi asked them as to who was Shah Abdul Lateef Bhittai as he did not know about Bhittai. There is another story about him that once in the State Bank meeting, he told me that he was basically Sindhi but his wife was a Hindustani immigrant and his two children had married in Punjab so he became 25 percent Sindhi, 25 percent Hindustani and 50 percent Punjabi.

So, it is the position and attitude of our own Sindhis who have proved to be the enemies or careless towards their language which is called Mother Tongue and the paradise is under the feet of mother. It can be termed that he who neglects the mother tongue, is devoid of mother’s paradise and honour. He can be termed as not real son of the soil but son of aliens. I must point out that the children of all Sindhis born in Karachi and other cities of Sindh, are getting education in other languages, therefore they are not in a position to write in Sindhi. They cannot even express the typical letters of Sindhi language in right dialect and sound. They speak Sindhi language grammatically wrong and their sound of speaking does not match with their own mother tongue Sindhi.

Continue reading GAURDING SINDHI LANGUAGE

A Historic Document Declaring Sindhi as the Official Language of Sindh (29 August 1857)

sindhilanguagedocSindhi was Official Language in last century but now …?

On 29th August 1857, Sindhi language was declared as National & official Language by the then British Government

Let us reclaim the right of Sindhi language as the National & official language & pledge to make the government obligatory to promulgate Sindhi Language compulsory in dealing state affairs.

A Historic Document Declaring Sindhi as the Official Language of Sindh (29 August 1857)

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Scanned copy of notification by British Government that Sindhi will be the state language in Sindh. It reads:’If some body thinks necessary to write any petition to the government in Persian than Sindhi Translation of the same content will be necessary along with original petition in persian. The notification was issued on August 2957 by the then Commissioner of Sindh Sir Boll Frere in Thatta.’ ,29th August, 18 57.

Continue reading A Historic Document Declaring Sindhi as the Official Language of Sindh (29 August 1857)