Category Archives: Pakistan

To protect Chinese investment, Pakistan Army leaves little to chance

Soldiers scan the contents of a truck at a checkpoint on the main highway outside Quetta
Soldiers scan the contents of a truck at a checkpoint on the main highway outside Quetta. Photo credits: Reuters

BY REUTERS

GWADAR: A heavy police presence, guarded convoys, new checkpoints and troop reinforcements have turned parts of the southern port city of Gwadar into a fortress, as Pakistan’s military seeks to protect billions of dollars of Chinese investment.

Securing the planned $46 billion economic corridor of roads, railways and pipelines from northwest China to the country’s Arabian Sea coast is a huge challenge in a country where militants and separatist gunmen are a constant menace.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1238167/

Pakistan’s wall of kindness

Don’t need it? Leave it here: Peshawar gets its own version of Deewar-i-Meherbani

BY IZHAR ULLAH

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PESHAWAR: Most of the walls in the posh neighbourhood of Hayatabad are drab structures of white and concrete; others have no paint at all. A bright yellow wall, breaking the monotony, stands out with the curious addition of clothes, hanging in various colours and sizes.

This is Peshawar’s wall of kindness, a charity wall installed on the main road. Any passerby, who wishes to donate used clothes for the homeless and poor, is welcome to drop them off here.

‘If you don’t need it, leave it’

Asad Ali Lodhi led a two-day drive with his organisation Serve Mankind requesting locals not to trash their used clothes, especially warm garments that can be used in the winter.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1236975/dont-need-it-leave-it-here-peshawar-gets-its-own-version-of-deewar-i-meherbani

Pakistan’s Hand in the Rise of International Jihad

By

TUNIS — PRESIDENT ASHRAF GHANI of Afghanistan has warned in several recent interviews that unless peace talks with Pakistan and theTaliban produce results in the next few months, his country may not survive 2016. Afghanistan is barely standing, he says, after the Taliban onslaught last year, which led to the highest casualties among civilians and security forces since 2001.

“How much worse will it get?” Mr. Ghani asked in a recent television interview. “It depends on how much regional cooperation we can secure, and how much international mediation and pressure can be exerted to create rules of the game between states.”

What he means is it depends on how much international pressure can be brought to bear on Pakistan to cease its aggression.

Read more » The New York Times
See more » http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/07/opinion/sunday/pakistans-hand-in-the-rise-of-international-jihad.html?mwrsm=Facebook&_r=0

The Quest for Political Identification in the Himalayan State of Jammu Kashmir

BY

Kashmir 1

Prior to the emergence of modern state, during the monarchy, the subjects of monarchs had little say in their relationship with the state. Over time, the concept of citizenship and identity developed, with the principle that citizens were not just residents of a given territory, but were members of a political community with a particular identification and recognition. Civil, political, and social rights became associated with citizenship, differing by country in the balance among these and in their scope.

Read more » Kashmir Observer
See more » https://kashmirobserver.net/2016/opinions/quest-political-identification-himalayan-state-jammu-kashmir-2909

Pakistan – Local manufacturing of mobile handsets from April

ISLAMABAD: A Chinese manufacturer will launch its mobile handset manufacturing and assembling unit in April (Pakistan’s first), a senior official at Ministry of Information Technology and Telecommunication said on Monday.

cell phone

The manufacturer — China’s Haier — is already operating in the country and has established a laptop manufacturing unit in Lahore.

The move would help in reducing the import bill as smartphones are in demand and also bring good investment as well as creating job opportunities, the official said.

The government had announced tax incentive package for manufacturing of mobile phones in budget 2015-16. These included income tax exemption for five years, zero per cent depreciation allowance for plants, machinery and production line equipment used for manufacturing of mobile phones certified by the Pakistan Telecommunication Authority (PTA) in the first year.

In the wake of new government policy facilitating local manufacturing/assembling of mobile handsets, a delegation led by Haier Groups CEO, Zeeshan Qureshi met with Minister of State for IT and Telecom, Anusha Rahman.

Mr Qureshi said Haier considers Pakistan a very lucrative and flourishing market for mobile handset manufacturing/assembling particularly with uptake of 3G/4G services in the country.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1236875/

China-Pakistan Economic Corridor: A boon for the economy, a bane for locals

BY ZOFEEN T. EBRAHIM

Pakistan’s Gilgit-Baltistan region is frequently in the news these days, but not necessarily for its mouth-watering cherries and dried apricots. The much touted US $46 billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) will pass through this beautiful province in the north to reach Chinese-operated Gwadar port in the country’s south. While there is hope it will transform the economy and help bridge Pakistan’s power shortfall, CPEC has also triggered concerns that the local people might be left out of the gains.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1236159/

ISI cultivated Taliban to counter Indian action against Pakistan: Musharraf

musharraf2Musharraf: Pakistan and India’s backing for ‘proxies’ in Afghanistan must stop

In interview with the Guardian, former Pakistan president voices his support for Ashraf Ghani and hints that he cultivated the Taliban

By  in Karachi

Pervez Musharraf, the former Pakistani military ruler accused of sheltering and supporting the Taliban after 2001, has called for an end to the backing of militant “proxies” in Afghanistan.

In an interview with the Guardian, Musharraf admitted that when he was in power, Pakistan sought to undermine the government of former Afghan president Hamid Karzai because Karzai had “helped India stab Pakistan in the back”. But now the time had come to “totally cooperate” with Ashraf Ghani, the Afghan president since September, who Musharraf believes is “the last hope for peace in the region”.

“In President Karzai’s times, yes, indeed, he was damaging Pakistan and therefore we were working against his interest. Obviously we had to protect our own interest,” Musharraf said. “But now President Ashraf Ghani has come and he is trying to restore balance in Afghanistan. We must totally cooperate with him.”

Read more » The Guardian
See more » http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/feb/13/pervez-musharraf-pakistan-india-proxies-afghanistan-ghani-taliban

 

Security beefed up as Lal Masjid cleric launches fresh movement in Islamabad

BY SHAKEEL QARAR

ISLAMABAD: A heavy contingent of police and Rangers was deployed in the areas surrounding Lal Masjid and Jamia Hafsa in the federal capital city to maintain law and order, following an announcement by cleric Abdul Aziz to hold a rally.

The rally announced by Lal Masjid cleric Abdul Aziz, in an earlier press release, was held to mark the initiation of a movement towards enforcement of a system based on the Holy Quran and Sunnah after Friday prayers today.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1219429

Russian Army to hold first mountain drills with Pakistan this year

BY DAWN.COM

MOSCOW: The Russian Army’s Commander-in-Chief Oleg Salyukov on Friday announced that Russian ground forces will hold its first ever military exercises with Pakistan in the coming year, according to TASS news agency.

The Russian Army is scheduled to hold seven international drills in 2016, including the “the first ever Russian-Pakistani special drills in mountainous terrain.”

“As part of interaction with our foreign colleagues in 2016, we have scheduled seven joint exercises with the involvement of the relevant units of foreign states,” the Russian Army Commander-in-Chief said.

The Russian Army will also hold joint anti-terror command and staff exercises of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, as well as a Russian-Vietnamese exercise, Salyukov added.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1234906/

Pakistani agents ‘funding and training Afghan Taliban’ – BBC

Pakistani intelligence gives funding, training and sanctuary to the Afghan Taliban on a scale much larger than previously thought, a report says.

Taliban field commanders interviewed for the report suggested that ISI intelligence agents even attend Taliban supreme council meetings.

Support for the Afghan Taliban was “official ISI policy”, the London School of Economics (LSE) authors suggest.

Read more » BBC
See more » http://www.bbc.com/news/10302946?SThisFB

Charsadda attack: It is time to ask Pakistan Army some hard questions

Whatever the military demanded, civilian government gave – from military courts to foreign policy, everything has been under control of Army. But what are the results beyond photo-ops and extensive PR gains?

By Umer Ali

A month after Pakistan observed the first anniversary of the deadly APS Peshawar attack, Islamist terrorists belonging to the banned TTP have struck again – this time at Bacha Khan University in Charsadda.

According to the latest updates, 21 people have been killed in the attacks with over 60 injured. Law enforcement agencies have cleared the premises, killing 4 terrorists.

This attack on another educational institution holds a lot of symbolic value. This is the third major attack in KPK in a month – all after Army’s continuous propagation of ‘phenomenal success’ and ‘broken backbones of terrorists’ in Zarb-e-Azb.

20th January is the death anniversary of Bacha Khan, a true humanist and preacher of non-violence. The attack took place when students had gathered to commemorate his death anniversary.

The attack on university, followed by quick condemnations

Read more » The Nation
See more » http://nation.com.pk/blogs/20-Jan-2016/charsadda-attack-it-is-about-time-we-asked-the-army-some-hard-questions

The demon we created

BY ZAHID HUSSAIN

IT took yet another militant attack across the border and increasing pressure from outside powers for us to finally act against Masood Azhar and his militant network — although one is not sure how serious we are in cleaning out the stables this time. Although proscribed some 14 years ago, his organisation continued to operate freely despite the evidence of its being involved in militant activities at home and outside.

How come a banned militant outfit was allowed to operate its offices across Punjab, that the security agencies now claimed to have closed down? Has the province been in a state of denial, or is there something more sinister? The Punjab government had firmly dismissed the reports of expanding activities of groups earlier associated with Jaish-e-Mohammad. Masood Azhar lived in a well-protected compound in his hometown Bahawalpur.

Many believe that the Pathankot raid and the alleged involvement of JeM in the incident may constitute a tipping point in the battle against militancy in Punjab. But it remains to be seen whether the government sticks to its promise. Such tipping points remained illusory in the past. Surely, it will not be so easy to wrap up the witches’ brew of militants that this country has been turned into. But it is our own survival that is now at stake because of these very same rogues.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1234101/the-demon-we-created

Peshawar flyover opens for traffic

Bab-i-Peshawar flyover opens for traffic

BY APP

PESHAWAR: Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Chief Minister Pervez Khattak and senior provincial minister Inayatullah jointly inaugurated the Bab-i-Peshawar flyover on Monday. The ceremony was attended by PTI Chairman Imran Khan and Jamaat-i-Islami chief Sirjaul Haq.

Bab-i-Peshawar flyover is the country’s second multi-level flyover — the first was built in Karachi.

The project was completed in record five-month time at a cost of Rs1.72 billion. The new flyover would regulate traffic flow on Pak-Afghan highway.

Speaking on the occasion, the chief minister congratulated the people of Peshawar over the inauguration of the gigantic flyover and said “we have started to revive the lost glory of the provincial capital”.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1233798/

Fatima Bhutto: America’s Moral Hypocrisy on Terrorism

Pakistani poet and author Fatima Bhutto responds to President Obama’s speech announcing the death of Osama bin Laden, arguing that Obama appeared to ignore suffering caused by America’s ongoing war on terrorism. “In perhaps the grossest pronouncement of triumphalism,” says Bhutto, “we were told that we were either with President Obama in celebratory euphoria, or not.”
—–
In the Opening Address at the 2011 Sydney Writers Festival, Fatima Bhutto, scion of the Pakistani political dynasty, addresses the current state of her country. Her talk focuses on Pakistan’s love/hate relationship with the United States and, in this way, reminds us of their parallel “nervous breakdowns.”

Pakistan is, at once, a country plagued by natural disasters, endemic political corruption, religious fundamentalism and is claimed by many to be the central headquarters of Islamist terrorism. Bhutto sees this condition Pakistan suffers as a plain result of crippling conspiracy-theorizing and manifesting as paranoiac nuclear armament.

But Bhutto finds not all the fault lies at home. She speaks to the West’s hypocrisy with regards to its aggressive “freedom fighting”, including its ever-mounting use of Drone strikes under Obama’s presidency and the civilian casualties which are beyond measure. – Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Fatima Bhutto is an Afghan-born Pakistani poet and writer. She studied at Columbia University and the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London. Bhutto is the granddaughter of former prime minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto and niece of Benazir Bhutto. She graduated from Columbia University in 2004, majoring in Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures, and from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in 2005 with a Masters in South Asian Government and Politics. Her books include Whispers of the Desert, 8.50 am 8 October 2005 and, most recently, Songs of Blood and Sword. She is a regular contributor to the New Statesman, The Daily Beast and The Guardian. For More details, please click this link » Youtube

Courtesy: Live Leak + FORA.TV
Read more » http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=c2c_1366507845#QIEkaIexV9KzzpIZ.01

Raheel, not Nawaz, Sharif Holds the Key to the India-Pakistan Peace Mystery

The idea of improving relations with India does occur to the Pakistani army but it is not sure about the terms of engagement

BY

The news of Masood Azhar’s possible detention in Pakistan left me with the same feeling I had when reading a story in my childhood about Sheikh Chilli, a man who built castles in the air. What if he hadn’t shaken his head so violently that the basket of eggs didn’t come crashing down, as did his dreams?

Even as I sat down for an interview soon after, Pakistan’s federal minister for privatisation claimed the news of the Jaish-e-Mohammed chief’s detention was not verified. He had come from a meeting with other ministers in which none vouched for the news of the arrest. In fact, the minister stated that the Ministry of Interior had advised him to be non-committal. The statement from the office of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif spoke of action against the JeM but was guarded about any specifics. So why did someone in authority leak the news of Azhar’s detention to the Pakistani media?

Read more » The Wire
See more » http://thewire.in/2016/01/17/raheel-not-nawaz-sharif-holds-the-key-to-the-india-pakistan-peace-mystery-19455/

 

Drought takes six more lives in Tharparkar, toll rises to 67

By HANIF SAMOON

MITHI: Six more children died from various diseases in different hospitals of Tharparkar district of Sindh in past 24 hours, raising the drought death toll to 67 since the start of this month.

A newborn died in Mithi Civil Hospital, five more minors lost lives in remote village of Diplo and Chhachhro talukas of district .

Meanwhile, scores of children were brought to the hospitals in Mithi, Diplo, Nagarparkar, Islamkot, Chhachhro and other towns of the district for treatment.

Parents and relatives of patients also complained about lack of healthcare facilities and attitude of doctors and other paramedical staff.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1233203/

The Pakistani Dystopia

BY

Imagine a country that is embroiled in a long and bloody conflict with its neighbor, and each time its democratically elected Prime Minister tries to reach out and make peace, his own army launches an attack to make sure the peace doesn’t take hold. You might think you were trapped inside a dystopian movie. Unless, of course, you’ve been to Pakistan, where this happens all the time.

This week, Pakistani officials said they had detained Masood Azhar, the leader of Jaish-e-Mohammed, a militant group, for his alleged role in overseeing the attack on an Indian airbase in the city of Pathankot earlier this month. The attack left seven Indians dead. Jaish-e-Mohammed is one of several Pakistani militant groups whose members routinely cross into India and carry out attacks there, for the ostensible purpose of prying loose Jammu and Kashmir, India’s only Muslim-majority state.
Azhar’s detention is almost certainly a farce, staged to placate foreign leaders. If the past is any guide, Azhar, who has been detained many times before, will soon be free and able to carry out more attacks. This is the way it has worked in Pakistan for years.

The attack on the airbase in Pathankot, on January 2nd, came little more than a week after the Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, flew to Lahore to meet the Pakistani Prime Minister, Nawaz Sharif, for a surprise summit. It was the first visit by an Indian leader to Pakistan in twelve years. By all accounts, the meeting went well. That’s an unqualified good; both countries possess nuclear weapons, and their unresolved disputes, especially over Kashmir, could have terrifying consequences. India and Pakistan have already been to war with each other four times.

So why would Pakistani-based fighters follow up a feel-good summit with a cross-border attack? Well, it wouldn’t be the first time, or the second, or even the third.

In 1999, Indian Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee took a bus across the border to meet Sharif, and the two men pledged that peace would prevail between their two countries. Less than three months later, Pakistani soldiers, dressed up like jihadis, crossed the Indian border in the Himalayas and captured several Indian army posts. The Indian army repelled the invaders but the fighting, centered around the town of Kargil, came dangerously close to spinning out of control. It doesn’t appear that the Pakistani military, which orchestrated the attack, ever bothered to ask Sharif for permission.

In July, 2001, Vajpayee invited the Pakistani dictator Pervez Musharraf, who had recently declared himself Chief Executive after seizing power from Sharif in a military coup, to the Indian city of Agra to talk peace. Three months later, Pakistani-based guerrillas mounted an assault on the Jammu and Kashmir State Assembly building, and two months after that they launched a brazen attack on the Indian Parliament in New Delhi. Indian troops were nearly ordered to cross the border, but the crisis was defused.

In September, 2008, Pakistan’s first elected leader in nine years, President Asif Zardari, made a series of peaceful overtures to India. Two months later, Pakistan-based terrorists attacked the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel and other targets in Mumbai, killing more than a hundred and fifty people and wounding more than three hundred.

I’m not the first person to notice that Pakistani militants regularly try to sabotage peaceful relations between their country and India. Aparna Pande, at the Hudson Institute, has put together a chronology of these attacks.

Read more » The New Yorker
See more » http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/the-pakistani-dystopia?mbid=social_facebook

Are we discovering Jaish only now?

By Ayaz Amir

Islamabad diary

Maulana Masood Azhar, founder and leader of Jaish-e-Muhammad – an outfit dedicated to ‘jihad’, the liberation of Kashmir and similar heady stuff – has been one of our more enduring ‘jihadi’ symbols, a long-standing fixture on the ‘jihadi’ scene.

He was arrested in India in 1994 and spent years in Indian prisons. When an Indian civilian aircraft was hijacked in December 1999, the hijackers demanded the Maulana’s release. The plane was flowing to Kandahar.

Maulana Azhar, Omar Saeed Sheik
h, serving a sentence in Hyderabad jail for his role in the killing of the journalist Daniel Pearl, and Mushtaq Zargar, the third militant, were flown by Indian authorities to Kandahar and handed over to the Taliban, then ruling Afghanistan. The then Indian foreign minister, Jaswant Singh, flew to Kandahar to supervise the handing over of the militants and the freeing of the passengers.

The Taliban brought Maulana Azhar and his two companions to the Pak-Afghan border at Chaman where they were said to have ‘disappeared’. Maulana Azhar was later seen being hailed as a hero and feted at various places. It took some time for the military government of Gen Pervez Musharraf to realise that this glorification of someone freed as a result of a hijacking was not something to celebrate…at least not openly. The Maulana reduced his public profile.

Jaish hit the headlines once more when along with the Lashkar-e-Taiba it was accused of being behind the attack on the Indian parliament in December 2001. On the one hand Pakistan was fully engaged with the United States in the ‘war on terror’ and here was this huge distraction caused by our ‘jihadi’ friends. Indian and Pakistan troops took up battle positions on the border.

There is thus a long history attached to Maulana Azhar. Since ‘jihad’ at one time was a sub-franchise of our school of national ideology based in Aabpara, Islamabad, it is not too far-fetched to infer that the Maulana and our strategy handlers have known each other for a long time.

So either we are first-rate idiots or we take the rest of the world to be peopled by idiots. For does it take a degree in advanced mathematics to see that if there is an adventure across the border – such as the attack on the Indian parliament, or the Mumbai attacks in 2008, or the Pathankot attack now – the finger of suspicion will be pointed not at someone from outer space but at our own ‘jihadi’ apparatus, which we all recognise is very powerful with its tentacles spread far and wide, and their present or erstwhile godfathers?

When Mumbai occurred the handlers of the attacks were seen to be operating from Pakistan. The Pathankot attack takes place and the Indians say the footprints go all the way to Pakistan. Either we say the Indians are talking nonsense and then we stick to our guns or we recognise the gravity of this charge. If Pakistan, not official Pakistan but the soil of Pakistan, was connected in any way with Mumbai, if there is any connection now with Pathankot, what will make us realise that this is embarrassing for Pakistan?

Continue reading Are we discovering Jaish only now?

Rangers raid The Nation resident editor’s house

Rangers officials raided the house of Salman Masood The Nation’s Resident Editor in Islamabad earlier this morning looking to search the premises. The officials arrived without any documents or warrant and said that a “terrorist search operation is underway”. A civilian man among the officials said he is from the “intelligence” without revealing his identity. The officials reiterated that it was a routine search operation.

Read more » The Nation
See more » http://nation.com.pk/islamabad/12-Jan-2016/rangers-raid-the-nation-editor-s-house

Lady Cadets of Pakistan

ON THE FRONT LINES OF GENDER EQUALITY WITH PAKISTAN’S LADY CADETS

By Aeyliya Husain

Lady Cadet Wardah Noor, a slim 24-year-old Pakistani with deep-set eyes and an erect bearing, has pinned all her hopes on becoming a soldier.

“I found my civilian life to be slow moving and unsatisfying,” she told me one evening in September after a full day of class and training exercises at the prestigious Pakistan Military Academy (PMA). Raised in a middle-class home, Wardah had already earned a college degree in computer science but found little opportunity in her small village in Pakistan’s Punjab province, where horse-driven carts were still the primary mode of transportation. She craved discipline and structure. She wanted, she realized, to join the army.

Read more » VICE
See more » http://www.vice.com/video/lady-cadets-of-pakistan

Pakistan should’ve nothing to do with Saudi-led sectarian ‘anti-terror coalition’

Every country holds its national interests before anything else

By Umer Ali

“Pakistan enjoys close and brotherly relations with Saudi Arabia and other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries and attaches great importance to their security,” Chief of Army Staff, General Raheel Sharif said in a meeting with Saudi Defense Minister and Deputy Crown Prince, Muhammad Bin Salman yesterday.

“Any threat to Saudi Arabia’s territorial integrity would evoke a strong response from Pakistan,” he further added.

This is the second visit of a Saudi official in three days to Pakistan. These recent visits came in the wake of rising tensions between Saudi Arabia and Iran.

Read more » The Nation
See more » http://nation.com.pk/blogs/11-Jan-2016/pakistan-should-ve-nothing-to-do-with-saudi-s-sectarian-anti-terror-coalition

WoW: Women On Wheels in Lahore, Pakistan.

PAKISTAN-WOMEN-RIGHTS-BIKES
Photo credits: AFP.

About 150 women motorcyclists after completing training with the collaboration of Special Monitoring Unit on Law & Order and City Traffic Police participated in the Women on Wheels (WoW) rally in Lahore.

The rally, a move to encourage female bike riding, was also attended by Austrian Ambassador Brigitta Balaha, prominent lawyer and human rights activist Asma Jahangir.

Read more » DAWN
See more »http://www.dawn.com/news/1232091/wow-women-on-wheels-in-lahore

India identifies JeM chief Masood Azhar as ‘handler’ of Pathankot terror attack; plot hatched in Pakistan

New Delhi: In a shot in the arm for the Indian establishment, Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) chief Maulana Masood Azhar, his brother Abdul Rauf Asghar, and two others have been identified by the intelligence agencies as ‘handlers’ behind Pathankot airbase terror attack.

Other than Azhar and Rauf, the other two handlers are Ashfaq and Kashim, the sources said. Rauf was mastermind of hijack of Air India plane in Kathmandu, in 1999 which was later taken to Kandahar in Afghanistan. The eight-day hijack crisis had ended after release of three hardcore militants including Azhar in exchange for the freedom of passengers and crew members who were held hostage.

The news agency further reported that Pathankot airbase terror plot was hatched in Markaz in Pakistan.

The details of these four persons have been shared with Pakistan “through proper channel” and India has pressed for stern action against them as a condition for any future talks with Pakistan, the sources claimed.

Read more » ZeeNews
See more » http://zeenews.india.com/news/india/pathankot-terror-attack-india-identifies-mastermind-plot-hatched-in-pakistans-markaz_1842698.html

The Indus Valley Civilization en-composed all of Pakistan.

The Indus Valley Civilization (IVC) was a Bronze Age civilization (3300-1300 BCE; mature period 2600-1900 BCE) extending from what today is northeast Afghanistan to Pakistan and northwest India. Along with Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia it was one of three early civilizations of the Old World, and of the three the most widespread It flourished in the basins of the Indus River, one of the major rivers of Asia, and the Ghaggar-Hakra River, which once coursed through northwest India and eastern Pakistan.

Read more » Crystalinks
See more » http://www.crystalinks.com/induscivilization.html

Pakistan expels senior Bangladesh diplomat as ‘spy’ row escalates

BY AFP | MATEEN HAIDER

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan has asked Bangladesh to withdraw one of its diplomats from Islamabad, Dhaka said Wednesday, in an apparent retaliation after the expulsion of a Pakistani envoy who allegedly funded a suspected extremist on trial for espionage.

Bangladesh Foreign Secretary Shahidul Haque said Islamabad had on Tuesday asked Dhaka to recall senior diplomat Moushumi Rahman from its high commission in Islamabad within 48 hours.

“The political counsellor and head of chancery in Islamabad has been given till Thursday to leave the country,” Haque told AFP.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1231165/

With Attacks in Afghanistan and India, Pakistan Must Get Serious About Terrorism

By Former Columnist for The Daily Times of Pakistan

For the people of Pakistan’s restive Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province, the year 2015 ended just like the past one had: on a bloody note. On Dec. 29, a bomb explosion targeting a government office killed at least 26 in Mardan, some 30 miles northwest of the provincial capital Peshawar. The breakaway Jamaat-ul-Ahrar faction of the jihadist terror group Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan has claimed responsibility for the attack. Separately, the TTP bragged about the attacks it carried out in 2015 in a year-end report, along with charts and infographics posted to its website. Regardless of which faction of the Pakistani Taliban claimed what attacks, it is clear that for Pakistan’s Pashtun heartland the war against jihadist terror is not over by any means. Pakistan’s army Zarb-e-Azb operation, now into its 19th month, does, however, seem to have disrupted the TTP’s command and control structure and its ability to launch cohesive attacks inside Pakistan at large.

Read more » The Huffington Post
See more » http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mohammad-taqi/afghanistan-india-pakistan-terrorism_b_8919548.html