Category Archives: Pakistan

62 banned groups active in Sindh, says official report

KARACHI: An official report authored by the Sindh home ministry has identified 62 banned religious or sectarian organisations active in the province, including the re-emergence of 35 such groups, it emerged on Wednesday.

“We have identified 62 banned religious / sectarian organisations and have requested the Ministry of Interior (MoI) for more information [about them],” said the report that was shared with the apex committee in a recent meeting.

It said the investigation revealed that 35 groups, which had gone into hibernation after being slapped with the ban by the federal government, had re-emerged.

Most of those groups [12], said the report, re-emerged in Benazirabad, the native district of the co-chairman of the ruling Pakistan Peoples Party. Besides, six of them resurfaced in Sukkur, five in Mirpurkhas, three each in Hyderabad and Korangi, and two each in Karachi West, Sujawal and Tando Mohammad Khan.

Officials said the government had included 602 persons in the IVth Schedule of the banned organisations in Sindh.

According to anti-terrorism law, the federal government may list a person “as a proscribed person in the Fourth Schedule on an ex-parte basis”, if there are reasonable grounds to believe that, such person is concerned in terrorism [category A]; an activist, office-bearer or an associate of an organisation kept under observation or banned [category B]; and in any way concerned or suspected to be concerned with such organisation or affiliated with any group or organisation suspected to be involved in terrorism or sectarianism or acting on behalf of, or at the direction of, any person or organisation proscribed under the ATC Act [category C].

Most of such individuals [221] belonged to the banned Sipah-i-Sahaba Pakistan (SSP), of whom 154 have been put under category A. The remaining persons belonging to other organisations are as under:

Khudam-ul-Islam [four], Harkat-ul-Mujahideen [19], Mohajir Qaumi Movement-Haqiqi [three], Pakistan Sunni Tehrik [10], Sipah-i-Mohammad Pakistan [39], Lashkar-i-Jhangvi [41], Lashkar-i-Tayyba [12], Jaish-i-Mohammad [32], Jundullah [five], Jamaat-ud-Dawa [10], Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan [27], Jeay Sindh Muttahida Mahaz[three], Tehreek-i-Jafria Pakistan [20], Lyari gangs [one], Majlis Wahdat-ul-Muslameen [four], Hizb-ul-Tahrir [one], Ahle Sunnat Wal Jamaat [eight], Al Qaida [three], persons categorised as jihadis [18], and ‘suspicious persons’ of all sects [120].

Some 444 of them have been put in category A, 115 in category B, and 43 in category C.

Most of such persons [395] reside in Karachi, followed by 65 in Sukkur, 55 in Hyderabad, 32 in Benazirabad, 46 in Larkana and nine in Mirpurkhas division.

About the action so far taken against the persons on the IVth Schedule, the report said out of total 602 such individuals, 28 accused had been arrested who were booked in 48 different cases. Some 29 of such cases have been registered in Karachi division alone. Eight cases were registered in Hyderabad, six in Sukkur, four in Benazirabad, and one in Mirpurkhas. No case has been registered in Larkana.

Read more » DAWN
See more >> http://www.dawn.com/news/1301082

Dialects of Sindhi language

These are the major dialects of Sindhi Language. The language is the same but their is a slight difference in words or way of speaking. Their are several other dialects of Sindhi language too (like Memoni) but they are not spoken by a big population.

Futher information about the Dialects:

1. Laasi – It is spoken by around 1 million people in Parts of Lasbela, Balochistan and Sindh.

2. Larri – It is spoken by over 2 million people, in Thatto, Sujawal and Tando.

3. Kutchhi, it is spoken by around 2 million people in Pakistan and 2 million in India too. Their is a hug Kutchhi population in Karachi, Sindh. The language bears more grammatical similarity with Sindhi and lexical similarity with Gujarati.

4. Thari or Thareli or (Ddaaddki): it is language of the people of Thar. Spoken on both side of border by over 6-7 million. It is a bit influenced by Rajasthani languages.

5. Vicholi: It is spoken by a huge population of Sindhis. It is spoken mostly in Hyderabad region. Over 11 million people speak this dialect.

6. Siroli: It is spoken by a large Number of people in Upper Sindh, Larkano and Sukkur region, but also in parts of Balochistan and RahimYarKhan (Punjab). It is influenced by Seraiki. It is spoke by over 11 million people. In Balochistan it is known as Firaqi Sindhi, with around 1 million speakers.

* In Karachi the situation is different and Sindhi is more influenced by Urdu, and all dialects mix up. While in rural Karachi people usually speak Laasi or Larri. The total number of Sindhi speakers worldwide is impossible to know as Census of Pakistan and India are politically influenced. According to famous Pakistani demographers the population of Sindh is usually 15-20% shown lesser than it actually is. The total number of Sindhis worldwide is over 40 million, out of which 80% live in Sindh, Pakistan. All the Memon’s and even those that came in 1947 are actually Sindhis by ancestry, their origin is from Thatto. Sindhis in India make up around 6-7 million of the population and while Sindhis in other countries make up around 1.5 million to 2 million, out of which 60% are Indian, and remaining Pakistani Diaspora, but the Pakistani Sindhi diaspora is growing at a faster rate*

Courtesy: Source of above material: Explore the Beauty of Sindh

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Other than that there are some more branches of the Dialects of Sindhi language

1- Lahinda لهندا معنا اولهندي واري زبان
2- Saraiki/ Jatki سرائڪي يا جتڪي
3- Kaytranni ڪيتراڻي جا لهندا سان مشابهت رکي ٿي
4- Ubhee اُڀي
5- Thareli/ ddaddki ٿريلي يا ڍاڍڪي
6- Mokakee موڪاڪي
7- Lorree chienee لوڙي چيني
8- Jadghhalee جدغالي
Reference: Janat-ul-Sindh book ريفرينس جنت السنڌ ڪتاب
Source: https://iaob.wordpress.com/2016/05/02/dialects-of-sindhi-language/

Sindh: German philologist Ernest Trump gets Latif Award 150 years after compiling Shah jo Risalo

trumpp
Ernest Trump

HYDERABAD: For the first time since the inception of the country, the Sindh culture department has posthumously honoured with Latif Award, German philologist Ernest Trumpp who was the first to compile Shah jo Risalo in 1866 and write a book on Sindhi grammar.

Sindh Minister for Food Nisar Ahmed Khuhro, who gave away awards to writers, artists and others for best performance in their respective fields on the third day of the 273rd Urs celebrations of great [Secular] Sufi poet Shah Abdul Latif Bhitai at Cultural Centre in Bhitshah on Friday, said that Sindh Minister for Culture Syed Sardar Ali Shah would travel to Germany to present the award to the late scholar’s family.

Ernest Trumpp, a German philologist (March 13, 1828 –April 5, 1885), was sent to pre-partitioned India in 1854 as a missionary by the Ecclesiastical Mission Society to study languages of India and prepare their grammars for use by Christian missionaries. He authored during his stay in India the first book on Sindhi grammar and compiled Shah Jo Risalo in 1866 A.D. Trumpp named his compilation Diwan when he edited and had it published in Leipzig, Germany.

Sindh Minister for Culture Syed Sardar Ali Shah said that either he would travel to Germany or the late scholar’s family would be invited to Sindh after the German consulate traced them.

“Trumpp compiled the poetry and took it to Germany with him where he got it published. He then brought it back in book form to Sindh. The original Shah jo Risalo is preserved at the Cultural Centre in Bhitshah,” he said.

The minister said that he would meet German consul general to decide the modalities of the visit. In fact, he said, German consul general was to attend the 273rd Urs celebrations but he did not get security clearance on account of Shah Noorani terrorist incident. The naming of Excellence Centre in Bhitshah after H.T. Sorley was a tribute to the scholar’s service as Bhita’s was interpreter, he said.

Read more >> DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1297219/german-philologist-gets-latif-award-150-years-after-compiling-shah-jo-risalo

Why Pakistani PM Sharif should replace the army chief

Raheel SharifBy not extending the army chief’s tenure, PM Sharif can send a message to the military that he runs the affairs. But punishing a noted journalist for reporting about the civilian-military tussle is not the way to do it.

Pakistani military is the most powerful institution in the South Asian country. There is a consensus about it in the public, and the experts also endorse it. The army chief, currently General Raheel Sharif, calls the shots in the Islamic country and is the de facto leader. Constitutionally, Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif is head of the country’s executive, but his civilian government has almost no say in defense and foreign policy matters. Even the domestic security affairs are controlled by the army and its spy agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI).

The proof of the army’s authority became evident yet again when on Tuesday, October 11, the government put renowned Pakistani journalist Cyril Almeida on the Exit Control List (ECL), barring him from leaving the country.

Read more » Deutsche Welle
See more » http://www.dw.com/en/why-pakistani-pm-sharif-should-replace-the-army-chief/a-36014438

Sindhi Hindus in Gujarat

Jhulelal SaiBy Khaled Ahmed

Hindus were driven out of Sindh after 1947. They went to the neighbouring Indian state of Gujarat but were not accepted there by the local Hindu communities. Shockingly, these very Hindus, partly to be accepted as true Hindus, participated in the anti-Muslim violence in Godhra in Gujarat in 2002.

These facts have been revealed in the book Interpreting the Sindhi World: Essays on society and history; Edited by Michel Boivin & Matthew Cook (Oxford University Press, 2010). Like East Pakistan, nationalism in Sindh was language-based. The province was pluralist, just like East Pakistan. Hindus and Muslims lived in peace. Richard Burton wrote: “Hindu religion is not to be found in a state of purity in Sindh. Hinduism here is mixed up with the heterogeneous elements of Islam, and the faith of Nanak Shah. A Hindu will often become the murid (follower) of a Mussulman, and in some cases the contrary takes place… all great Pirs revered by the Moslems have classical Hindu names” (p.17).

The Supreme Court of India, in 2004, fined a litigant for asking to delete Sindh from the Indian national anthem, thus challenging any organic relationship between territory and nationalism (p.31).

The modern state of Gujarat consists of a strip of ‘mainland’ Gujarat, the peninsula of Saurashtra, and the western arm of Kutch (p.33). Later, Junagadh was also added. The Hindus of Sindh mostly moved to this state after Partition. They left en masse in 1948, after the immigrating populations touched off riots in Karachi.

Rita Kothari records the Hindu migration into Gujarat. Ships from Karachi arrived at the ports of Porbander, Veraval, and Okha on Gujarat’s coast. Movement towards Gujarat also happened indirectly, especially via Rajasthan, when Sindhis arrived from Mirpurkhas (p.58). These Sindhis looked ‘Muslim-like’ to the locals: “The Hindus of Sindh were not quite the most suitable examples of orthodox Hindus, as they were a meat-eating community in a largely vegetarian region” (p.59).

Read more » The Express Tribune
See more » http://tribune.com.pk/story/128170/sindhi-hindus-in-gujarat/

Exclusive: Act against militants or face international isolation, civilians tell military

Excerpt:

BY CYRIL ALMEIDA

…. On the US, Mr Chaudhry said that relations have deteriorated and will likely further deteriorate because of the American demand that action be taken against the Haqqani network. On India, Mr Chaudhry stated that the completion of the Pathankot investigation and some visible action against Jaish-i-Mohammad were the principal demands.

Then, to a hushed but surprised room, Mr Chaudhry suggested that while China has reiterated its support for Pakistan, it too has indicated a preference for a change in course by Pakistan. Specifically, while Chinese authorities have conveyed their willingness to keep putting on technical hold a UN ban on Jaish-i-Mohammad leader Masood Azhar, they have questioned the logic of doing so repeatedly.

Extraordinary exchange

The foreign secretary’s unexpectedly blunt conclusions triggered an astonishing and potentially ground-shifting exchange between the ISI DG and several civilian officials.

In response to Foreign Secretary Chaudhry’s conclusions, Gen Akhtar asked what steps could be taken to prevent the drift towards isolation. Mr Chaudhry’s reply was direct and emphatic: the principal international demands are for action against Masood Azhar and the Jaish-i-Mohmmad; Hafiz Saeed and the Lashkar-e-Taiba; and the Haqqani network.

To that, Gen Akhtar offered that the government should arrest whomever it deems necessary, though it is unclear whether he was referring to particular individuals or members of banned groups generally. At that point came the stunning and unexpectedly bold intervention by Punjab Chief Minister Shahbaz Sharif.

Addressing Gen Akhtar, the younger Sharif complained that whenever action has been taken against certain groups by civilian authorities, the security establishment has worked behind the scenes to set the arrested free. Astounded onlookers describe a stunned room that was immediately aware of the extraordinary, unprecedented nature of the exchange.

To defuse tensions, Prime Minister Sharif himself addressed Gen Akhtar and said that policies pursued in the past were state policies and as such they were the collective responsibility of the state and that the ISI DG was not being accused of complicity in present-day events. …

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1288350/exclusive-act-against-militants-or-face-international-isolation-civilians-tell-military

Water Resources of Jammu Kashmir and Belligerent Occupation

NayyarBy Nayyar Niaz Khan

The tension between India and Pakistan over Jammu Kashmir has its traditional rivalry over the ownership of entire Jammu Kashmir State, while the majority of masses in Jammu Kashmir is resisting for the right-to-self-determination. Presently, diplomatic lingo on either side is intimidating to add the real dimension to the conflict; this very dimension surpasses the human, political, cultural and economic rights of people in Jammu Kashmir and strips off the hidden desires of occupiers. Both the nuclear rivals are wide-open that their real tension over Jammu Kashmir is the control over its natural resources: Water being of the prime importance for which the entire Jammu Kashmir may turn into a blood-bath.

Continue reading Water Resources of Jammu Kashmir and Belligerent Occupation

The real utopia: This ancient civilisation thrived without war

The Indus civilisation seems to have flourished for 700 years without armour, weapons, inequality or royalty. Here’s how to build a paradise on Earth

utopia_main-800x533
Ancient Indus Valley Civilization.

PICTURE a peace-loving Atlantic island ruled by reason. Its 54 cities are governed by educated officials and an elected-for-life prince. Although war hasn’t been abolished, it is used only as a last resort. People see no glory in fighting, and capture enemies rather than kill them. This is the original Utopia – the pagan, communist and pacifist world sketched out exactly 500 years ago in Thomas More’s eponymous work of fiction.

More’s book has exerted a powerful pull on our imaginations – not least through utopian science fiction. But in a world of autocracy, fanaticism and terrorism, it seems as far from reality as ever. Indeed, arguments still rage about his true intention. His title, derived from the ancient Greek ou-topos – meaning “no place” – is a pun on eu-topos, “good place”. Was More proposing a blueprint of an ideal society or satirising the self-interest, greed and military exploits of the hereditary monarchies of his time?

On one thing nearly everyone agrees: no utopia has ever existed. Large human societies tend to be governed by coercion. The instinct for warfare has been a driving force in nearly every civilisation of the last five millennia, from ancient Mesopotamia to the British Empire.

Or has it? One mysterious, ancient society might give the lie to that. The civilisation of the Indus valley is the most enigmatic of the four great early civilisations. But while Mesopotamia, ancient Egypt and ancient China gloried in warfare, it seems absent from the Indus valley. Was this a real, functioning utopia? If so, how did it survive, and why did it eventually disappear?

Read more » New Scientist
See more » https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23130910-200-indus-the-only-great-civilisation-ever-to-survive-without-war/

India Says It Hit Pakistan Terror Camps After Attack on Army

Modi

India says strikes conducted Wednesday; Pakistan denies attack

India said it attacked terrorist camps just across the border in Pakistan, the biggest military escalation since a standoff 17 years ago, as Prime Minister Narendra Modi retaliated for a deadly strike against Indian soldiers earlier this month.

Read more » Bloomberg
See more » http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-09-29/india-attacked-pakistan-terror-camps-says-no-more-ops-planned

Pakistan isolated in world focussed on horrors of terror: Indian diplomats

pak-india-flagBy IANS – By Arul Louis

UNITED NATIONS: Pakistan’s campaign on Kashmir at the UN has fallen flat and Islamabad has been isolated in a world focused on the horrors of terror, according to senior Indian officials basking in the afterglow of what they see as a diplomatic victory.

Terrorism is a primary concern for countries around the world and of the about 131 countries that have spoken as of Friday morning at the UN General Assembly summit, “90 per cent” raised the issue ..

More » The Economic Times
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics-and-nation/pakistan-isolated-in-world-focussed-on-horrors-of-terror-indian-diplomats/articleshow/54490563.cms

US lawmaker accuses Pakistan of ruling through jihadist extremism

Brad ShermanWASHINGTON: Alleging that Pakistan is using jihadist extremism to administer and is bent upon extinguishing other cultures in the country, a top US lawmaker has warned Islamabad that it might be headed for 1971 like partition soon if it continues to do so.

“Those who think that they can keep Pakistan together by attacking and extinguishing other cultures with jihadist extremism should go visit Dhaka,” Congressman Brad Sherman, ranking member of the House Foreign Affairs Sub-Committee on Asia and the Pacific said at an event of Sindhi Foundation, Washington.

More » The Economic Times
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/international/world-news/us-lawmaker-accuses-pakistan-of-ruling-through-jihadist-extremism/articleshow/54516863.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest

Japanese researchers help unravel mystery of the Indus civilization

KOJI KAMIYA, Nikkei staff writer

20131211_indus_medium

TOKYO — A five-year study by a Japanese research team could change the accepted view of the ancient Indus Valley civilization.

The study found that thousands of years ago, several cities in the Indus Valley, in what is today Pakistan and India, created a trade network that became a multicultural, multilingual civilization, and not a society founded on centralized authoritarian rule as previously believed. Many characteristics of this ancient civilization can be seen today in societies of southern Asia, and these links between the ancient and the modern are arousing researchers’ interest.

The fresh image of the Indus civilization is being painted by a team of researchers led by Professor Emeritus Toshiki Osada of the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, which is based in Kyoto. The results of five years of research, known as the Indus Project, were published in October by the Kyoto University Press as “Indus: Exploring the Fundamental World of South Asia” and “The Riddle of the Indus Civilization,” both compiled by Osada.

Read more » NIKKEI ASIAN REVIEW 
See more » http://asia.nikkei.com/magazine/20131219-Power-play/Culture/Japanese-researchers-help-unravel-mystery-of-the-Indus-civilization

The Sindh Foundation announces event on Sept 25

WASHINGTON, DC: The Sindhi Foundation has announced to have an event on Sunday, September 25 honoring Congressman Brad Sherman. In which former Sindh assembly speaker Sayed Jalal Mahmood Shah would attend the session. Mr. Jalal would discuss about the current situation of Sindh and Sindhis with Congressman Sherman.

Read more » Online Indus
See more » http://www.onlineindus.com/the-sindh-foundation-announces-event-on-sept-25/

US lawmakers move bill to designate Pakistan a terrorist state

USA PakIn a shocking setback to Islamabad, two US lawmakers have moved a bill to designate Pakistan as a ‘state sponsor of terrorism’, Times of India reported Wednesday.

The move testifies to growing complexity of relations between the two ostensibly major allies in the ‘war against terror.’  The bill, HR 6069 or the Pakistan State Sponsor of Terrorism Designation Act, enjoins the US administration to make a formal call on the matter within four months of its passage.

Read more » The Express Tribune
See more » http://tribune.com.pk/story/1185650/us-lawmakers-move-bill-designate-pakistan-terrorist-state/

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More details » BBC »  http://www.bbc.com/urdu/world/2016/09/160921_us_congress_bill_terorism_pakistan_rh

Karachi, Sindh was known to the ancient Greeks

The area of Karachi (ڪراچي) was known to the ancient Greeks by many names: ‘Krokola’ and ‘Morontobara’ port (probably the modern Manora Island near the Karachi harbour), from where Alexander the Great’s admiral Nearchus sailed for back home.The Arabs called it the port of Debal, from where Muhammad Bin Qasim led his conquering force into Sindh.According to legend, the city started as a Harbour by the Sea Transporters of Kutchh and Arab states and Fishing settlement .The city was under Kalhora rulers and later under Talpur rulers of Sindh. It was conquered by British east India Company in 1839. The town was later annexed to the British Indian Empire. When Pakistan got independence in 1947, Karachi was selected as its capital. The capital was shifted to Islamabad in 1959.

Courtesy: via FRIENDS OF SINDHU (INDUS) CIVILIZATION.

The forgotten utopia: The Indus people may have lived for 700 years without war, weapons or inequality

The Indus civilisation lived across South Asia from 2600-1900 BC
Artefacts, such as jewellery, have been found, but not a single weapon
There is little evidence of a government, royalty or any other leader
Some experts have said it is impossible for Indus to have lived in this way
But until the Indus scripture has been translated, it is difficult to know

By SHIVALI BEST FOR MAILONLINE

Many believe the idea of a utopian society is an impossible fantasy.

indus-people

But there may have been one mysterious, ancient group of people that was able to fulfil the dream of life without conflict or rulers.

Remains of the Indus civilisation, which flourished from 2600 to 1900 BC, show no clear signs of weapons, war or inequality.

This is according to Andrew Robinson. the author of ‘The Indus: Lost civilisations’, who has written an in-depth piece in the New Scientist.

‘All signs point to a prosperous and advanced society – one of history’s greatest,’ he writes.

The Indus Empire stretched over more than a million square miles across the plains of the Indus River from the Arabian Sea to the Ganges, over what is now Pakistan, northwest India and eastern Afghanistan.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3791308/The-forgotten-utopia-Indus-people-lived-700-years-without-war-weapons-inequality.html#ixzz4KQArUPmt
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The crisis of Mohajir identity

By Harris Khalique

EXCERPT:

A large part of Mohajirs from western India who live in urban Sindh had nothing to do with Delhi or UP. They spoke Memoni, Kathiawari, Malabari, Kokni and Katchi to name a few. Even many from Indian Punjab, Haryana and Kashmir who are settled in Karachi and vote for the MQM are not strictly Urdu-speaking if the term means identifying one’s mother tongue. Besides, those who have come from Assam, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Kerala are all bracketed among the Urdu-speaking.

One may argue that now these communities settled in urban Sindh speak Urdu as their first language or even as their mother tongue. But if we take this as a rule, almost all of middle-class Punjabis across Punjab and Islamabad, and increasingly many among middle class Sindhis, Seraikis and Hindko-speakers and particularly those coming from mixed parentage including Pakhtuns and Baloch, speak Urdu as their first language of communication. Hence, using the term Urdu-speaking for a particular political community may well be seen as a respectful term for them but does not do justice to the language which is shared by a larger number of people and serves as the lingua franca.

Therefore, those settled in Sindh whose forebears had come from India can at best claim to have a political identity. That too is based only on their shared economic interest and fundamental rights due to living in a largely but not entirely contiguous geographical area within the province of Sindh.

The claim to an ethno-linguistic identity is farfetched. Asking for the division of the province is unjustified and wrong. The crisis of Mohajir identity can only end when those living in Sindh begin to believe in their Sindhi identity. Language/languages is not the only identity marker.

If Gujaratis and Tharis, and the Dhatki, Balochi, Brahvi and Seraiki speaking population that are settled in rural Sindh can all become a part of the larger Sindhi identity, those speaking Urdu and other languages as their mother tongues and living in urban centres of Sindh can also assimilate, politically first and culturally over generations. However, the enlightened Sindhi middle class also has to play a proactive role in making this happen.

Read more » ThE NEWS
See more » https://www.thenews.com.pk/print/148363-The-crisis-of-Mohajir-identity

Easter Island – Indus Valley Scripts

Amazing similarities between two distinct cultures separated by thousands of miles!

indus script

Rongorongo is Oceania’s only indigenous script. It is found in one location only – In the centre of the Pacific Ocean, over a thousand miles from any continent. We now know that the first migrations to Easter Island were deliberate, because they involved taking the people, plants and animals needed to establish sustainable colonies(6). The script was first identified in 1864, and any suggestions that it originated after European contact are  rejected on the basis that at least two of the Rongorongo tablets are dated to before their arrival(1). So the big question remains… where did it come from?

Read more » Ancient Wisdom
See more » http://www.ancient-wisdom.com/easterislandindusvalley1.htm

Sur Saamoondi

Translation and Transcription by Emily Hauze

لاهيان جي نه چِتان، الا! اُن مَ وِسران
مَڙهيو مَنجهارن، جيءُ منهنجو جن سين
شاهه عبدالطيف ڀٽائي

In romanized Sindhi:

Laahiyaan jay na chitaan, alla! un ma wisraan,
Marrhiyo manjharan, jeeu muhinjo jin seen.
~ Secular Sindhi Soofi poet Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai (1689 – 1752)
Sur Saamoondi

“O Heavens! His heart and mine from within are entwined;
Let me abide in his mind; if forgotten, I die.”

—-
Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai: from “Sur Samoondi”
in my translation.
—-

An explanation for those who do not know the context: “Sur Samundi” is the chapter in which Shah Latif writes from the perspective of young women whose husbands are sailors. They wait in anxiety, love, and hope, while their men are at sea, and they pray to be reunited. For Shah Latif, reunion with the husband equates to reunion with the Beloved (God), for which the Sufi soul is eternally longing.

Courtesy: Emily Hauze + Social media
https://www.facebook.com/emily.hauze/media_set?set=a.10206112358000488.1073741949.1608960197&type=3

True Freedom and the Neglected Chapter of Political History

NayyarBy Nayyar N Khan

The entire South Asia has been shadowed by the staggering apprehension of security concerns, cross-border conflicts and poor connectivity. The insubstantial situation of the one of the densely populated region in the world has made it one of the least integrated in the world besides having common bonds across the international borders. India and Pakistan being two nuclear rivals and key states of the region have always been on forefronts since their creation in 1947. Religion has always been a dominant factor in classifying the geo-political trends while evaluating the Indo-Pak relations. Although India claims to maintain her secular traditions but in practice religion was one of the fueling elements that impacted the Indian politics. While Pakistani politicians, on the other hand have consistently failed to identify the common “Political Nomenclature”. Instead of looking for the common bonds to strengthen the democratic character politicians have always preferred to take refuge under the imported umbrella of identification and sadly ignored the true sentiments of the struggling masses. With the new Indian identity after BJP’s government, dimensions of conflicts also shifted from political to more deeply implanted in religious ones.  The conflict over Jammu Kashmir has its historical roots in human rights and right of freedom and development. Over the years and decades ruling class of both countries have turned the Kashmir conflict into a religious one and have deliberately ignored the important variables to find the lasting solution of the conflict.

Human history is full of endless struggles and lessons. Among countless lessons in the evolutionary phases, there is one distinctive lesson that can be drawn by going through the pages of hitherto history and it could be summed up as “if the people are to co-exist peacefully and respectfully and advance their life, they must be free of any kind of oppression and enjoying equal standards in rights.” Going deep down the pages of history we also come to know that as long as the mistreatment and exploitation of one class by the other exists and the majority of human race living in a particular region is deprived of fundamental rights and prospects to develop in a free environment without fear; the slogans of democracy, peace and justice are absurd and muted and claptrap assortments. The people of Jammu Kashmir have been going through multi-folded layers of exploitation that has taken its tolls in almost every single family living across LOC in this beautiful Himalayan Country. Major Obstacles in shape of occupation, slavery, exploitation by the ruling elites and imposed socio-economic order have protracted impacts in blocking the road to progress and development. Digging down the layers of history to determine where and what went wrong in the past seven decades definitely would help in advancing towards ending the conflict in a rational way but it needs much more time and efforts to point out every single ring of the chain. Shortly, the ruling class of the region has failed badly time and again to end the conflict in Jammu Kashmir. If the dispute is still going on Kashmiri people should not be held responsible for that rather class based interests of both Indian and Pakistani ruling elite is the major factor that hindered all the efforts in resolving the dispute in sub-continent. Ruling elite of both countries have defaulted on their own promises and pledges with Kashmiri people and International Community.  While reading all those dusted pages of political history of South Asia, one common question arises in the minds of Kashmiri people that almost seventy years have passed since sub-continent was divided and we still are not free; and the life of the masses is still sadly crippled by the yokes of exploitation and the shackles of suppression. All the divided parts of Jammu Kashmir have become milk-cows for the local legislative gangs, feeding grounds as pleasant as possible for a horde of the local rogues and the parasites of Kashmir conflict.

Continue reading True Freedom and the Neglected Chapter of Political History

Rajiv Malhotra Discussing the new MOHENJO DARO movie

Rajiv Malhotra Discussing the new MOHENJO DARO movie, what is true and false about its depictions of history. What are the social-political implications. How to watch it for entertainment as well as education. Please watch my talk to develop a Vedic drishti for interpreting this movie.

Courtesy: Rajiv Malhotra >> Youtube

Corruption in Pakistan

 

Corruption in Pakistan is widespread,[1] particularly in the government and lower levels of police forces.[2] In 2014, Pakistan scored 126 out of 174 on theCorruption Perceptions Index published by the Transparency International,[3]improving slightly from its previous score of 127 out of 175 in 2013.[4] Pakistan saw a significant improvement in its statistics in 2013 when its ranking improved by 12 indices compared to its previous rankings[5] – 139 out of 174 in 2012,[6]134 out of 182 in 2011,[7][8] 143 out of 178 in 2010,[9] and 139 out of 180 in 2009.[10]

Corruption has plagued Pakistan from the very moment it came into existence.[11] It was the unrepentant display of plutocracy amongst its powerfulbureaucracy and the West Pakistani Punjabi Muslim landowners that partly led to the secession of East Pakistan into the nation-state of Bangladesh.[12] Later,nationalisation policies prepared under the government of prime minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto paved the way for the corrupt elites to politicise the nation’s economic planning resulting in a public outcry against corruption.[13] This led the military dictator Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq to draft policies regarding denationalisation of institutions which only ended up benefiting a few rich business magnates such as the future prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, who was also a protégé of the military dictator.[14]

Read more » Wikipedia
See more » https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corruption_in_Pakistan

Who were the people of the Indus Valley Civilisation? The Mystery of Mound 4

 

Archaeologists at Rakhigarhi in Haryana hope their excavations throw up an answer to this and more, unlocking the mysteries of the people of ancient India.

Mound 4 looks as unimpressive as it sounds, a small rise with plastic waste and garbage strewn along the three-minute walk to the top. Hundreds of pucca houses have been built on it, complete with cowsheds, the cattle contentedly chewing fodder, the men flaked out on cots in the verandahs, sleeping off the summer afternoon, women heard from inside houses but not seen. Appearances, though, are misleading. Under the sprawling settlement on Mound 4, say archaeologists, is the site of an at least 5,500 year-old human settlement, an important centre of the Harappan Civilisation in the Indus Valley, one that they claim could unlock the mysteries of the people of ancient India. Among the many questions it hopes to answer is an enduring one: who were the people of the Indus Valley Civilisation?

Read more » The Indian Express
See more » http://indianexpress.com/article/lifestyle/art-and-culture/the-mystery-of-mound-4/

“If Someone Speaks Unfairly Of Pakistan, It Is Painful To Me…” – Says Emily An American

How does it feel when a foreigner, especially an American falls in love with Pakistan?

Surprisingly this is not a fairy tale but a true story of Emily Hauze who fell in love with Pakistan and the culture of Sindh. The story does not end here. She initiated on a personal level to improve the image of Pakistan. Isn’t it surprising?

Jovago Pakistan got the opportunity to interview Emily to know more about her views, experiences and thoughts about Pakistan. 

Our first question is who is Emily Hauze? Tell us a little detail about yourself.

I am an American blogger, photographer, and generally curious person. I grew up in a very small town in the southern state of Tennessee, but moved to Pennsylvania, where I did my bachelor’s and master’s degrees (in Music and German literature).

I am a lifelong student of all facets of arts and culture — not only photography but all forms of visual art, and theatre, dance, and of course literature and music.

How do you finance your trips?

In general, the only major expense for me on my trips is the plane ticket. That and also the cost of obtaining a Visa, for which I have to reapply each time I come. But once I arrive in Pakistan, I find that I am not allowed to pay for anything.

Since I always stay with friends, lodgings are not an issue, and food is always abundant and shared freely in Pakistani homes.

I am not much interested in shopping, so I don’t have to save up much for that purpose. Beyond this, many of the cultural and historic sites I visit with my friends and family are free or very inexpensive.

Continue reading “If Someone Speaks Unfairly Of Pakistan, It Is Painful To Me…” – Says Emily An American

For 35 years, Sindhi volunteers have helped worshippers at a Chennai mosque break their Ramzan fast

The followers of the Sufi saint Dada Ratanchand carry on the tradition of serving food at the Wallajah Mosque for all thirty days of the fast.

It’s dusk in Chennai. The warm evening light streams in from behind the two white minarets of the Wallajah mosque in Triplicane. In the spacious front yard, more than 50 men wearing white fez caps wait silently. A little before the evening prayers begin in the 220-year-old mosque, a yellow truck swings into the driveway. The men immediately spin into action, unloading metal containers of porridge, biscuits, bananas and vadas.

As they have done for the past 35 years, Sindhi volunteers from the Sufidar Trust – who follow the teachings of Dada Ratanchand, a Partition refugee who settled in Chennai – have gathered to serve iftaar, the meal that ends the daily fast during the month of Ramzan.

The trust aims to spread the teachings of the Sufi saint Shahenshah Baba Nebhraj Sahib of Rohri, Sindh. “We believe all Gods are one, only people have turned it into different sects,” said Govind Bharwani, who has been a volunteer with the Trust almost since its inception. “That is what our guruji told us.”

Read more » Scroll.in
See more » http://scroll.in/article/811273/for-35-years-sindhi-volunteers-have-helped-worshippers-at-a-chennai-mosque-break-their-ramzan-fast

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa belongs to Afghans: Achakzai

Pashtun leader Mahamood Khan Achakzai has said that he would not allow anyone to harass Afghan refugees in their “own land”. He directly said that Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province belongs to Afghans and they can live there without fear and irritation.

“If Afghans are harassed in other parts of Pakistan, they should come here to the Pakhtunkhwa province, where no one can ask them for refugee cards, because it also belongs to them,” Achakzai who leads the Pakhtunkhwa Millie Awami Party said.

Read more » The Pashtun Times
See more » http://thepashtuntimes.com/khyber-pakhtunkhwa-belongs-to-afghans-achakzai/