Tag Archives: Indus Valley Civilisation

International Conference on Moenjodaro and Indus Valley Civilisation’

LARKANO: Archaeolo­gists from the Unites States, United Kingdom, France, Spain, Japan and Italy attending the three-day ‘International Conference on Moenjodaro and Indus Valley Civilisation’ at the ancient site read out their research papers on the second day on Friday.

The papers focused on technical aspects dealing with the discoveries made and research carried out hitherto, measures undertaken so far to protect and preserve the site for posterity, mid-term plans for the site’s preservation, promotion of tourism, the Indus script discovered so far, seals’ carving techniques etc.

Dr Ayumu Konasukawa, an archaeologist from Japan, presented his paper on ‘Chronological change and continuity of seal carving techniques from the early Harappan to the Harappan periods in the Ghaggar basin’. According to his research, the data for analyses comprises fired steatite seals discovered at Kunal, Banawali and Farmana. Through scanning electron microscope and 3D analysis, it has become evident that the seals found in the basin during the said periods are characterised in various carving techniques. Although the seals have a lot of difference in terms of manufacturing technique and design, such as the motif of the surface, they also have commonality as regards a part of carving techniques.

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The real utopia: This ancient civilisation thrived without war

The Indus civilisation seems to have flourished for 700 years without armour, weapons, inequality or royalty. Here’s how to build a paradise on Earth

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Ancient Indus Valley Civilization.

PICTURE a peace-loving Atlantic island ruled by reason. Its 54 cities are governed by educated officials and an elected-for-life prince. Although war hasn’t been abolished, it is used only as a last resort. People see no glory in fighting, and capture enemies rather than kill them. This is the original Utopia – the pagan, communist and pacifist world sketched out exactly 500 years ago in Thomas More’s eponymous work of fiction.

More’s book has exerted a powerful pull on our imaginations – not least through utopian science fiction. But in a world of autocracy, fanaticism and terrorism, it seems as far from reality as ever. Indeed, arguments still rage about his true intention. His title, derived from the ancient Greek ou-topos – meaning “no place” – is a pun on eu-topos, “good place”. Was More proposing a blueprint of an ideal society or satirising the self-interest, greed and military exploits of the hereditary monarchies of his time?

On one thing nearly everyone agrees: no utopia has ever existed. Large human societies tend to be governed by coercion. The instinct for warfare has been a driving force in nearly every civilisation of the last five millennia, from ancient Mesopotamia to the British Empire.

Or has it? One mysterious, ancient society might give the lie to that. The civilisation of the Indus valley is the most enigmatic of the four great early civilisations. But while Mesopotamia, ancient Egypt and ancient China gloried in warfare, it seems absent from the Indus valley. Was this a real, functioning utopia? If so, how did it survive, and why did it eventually disappear?

Read more » New Scientist
See more » https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23130910-200-indus-the-only-great-civilisation-ever-to-survive-without-war/

Indus Valley civilisation may pre-date Egypt’s pharoahs

Indus Valley Civilisation known for well-planned cities
Experts carbon dated pottery and animal bones at Bhirrana
They now believe the civilisation is around 8,000 years old
It is thought climate change may not have destroyed the civilisation

By SARAH GRIFFITHS FOR MAILONLINE

With its impressive pyramids and complex rules, Ancient Egypt may seem to many the epitome of an advanced early civilisation.

But new evidence suggests the Indus Valley Civilisation in India and Pakistan, famed for its well-planned cities and impressive crafts, predates Egypt and Mesopotamia.

Already considered one of the oldest civilisations in the world, experts now believe it is 8,000 years old – 2,500 years older than previously thought.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3621622/Indus-Valley-civilisation-pre-date-Egypt-s-pharoahs-Ancient-society-2-500-years-older-thought.html#ixzz4AX8Y3way
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Indus Valley Civilisation much older than thought: report

KOLKATA: It may be time to rewrite history textbooks. Scientists from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kharagpur, and Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) have uncovered evidence that the Indus Valley Civilisation is at least 8,000 years old, and not just 5,500 years old. It took root well before the Egyptian (7,000 BC to 3,000 BC) and Mesopotamian (6,500 BC to 3,100 BC) civilisations. What’s more, the researchers have found evidence of a pre-Harappan civilisation that existed for at least 1,000 years before this.

The discovery, published in the prestigious Nature journal on May 25, may force a global rethink on the timelines of the so-called ‘cradles of civilisation’. The scientists believe they also know why the civilisation ended about 3,000 years ago: climate change.

“We have recovered perhaps the oldest pottery from the civilisation. We used a technique called ‘optically stimulated luminescence’ to date pottery shards of the Early Mature Harappan time to nearly 6,000 years ago and the cultural levels of pre-Harappan Hakra phase as far back as 8,000 years,” said Anindya Sarkar, head of the department of geology and geophysics at IIT-Kharagpur.

Read more » DAWN
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‘Indus civilisation spread through its strong culture, not military conquests’

BY PEERZADA SALMAN

 

KARACHI: Sindh belongs to the Indus Valley Civilisation, which was unique in that it did not spread through military conquests but by cultural expansion as its roots can be detected from Mehrgarh to Kathiawar to Madhya Pradesh.

This was stated by eminent historian Dr Mubarak Ali during his presidential address in the first session at the Sindh Development Conference, which was organised by the Sindhi Association of North America (SANA) at a hotel, on Saturday afternoon.

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