Tag Archives: Talibanization

The Punjabi hegemony on Pakistan

The Punjabi hegemony

By Raza Habib Raja

The selective way of presenting history in Pakistan conveniently ignores the fact that at its creation, there were two large sometimes contrasting and sometimes overlapping movements. The first was primarily centred around Muslim identity and tried to actually bargain a better position for its bearers. This movement though ended up in carving a separate homeland for the Muslims, nevertheless did not have that strong separatist thrust at least in the beginning.

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There is no Islam in Swat. The Taliban have finished it.

The Women of Swat and ‘Mullah Radio’

By a group of NWFP women

Courtesy: AIRRA.ORG

Islam started as soon as we fled from Malakand. People outside Swat think we had Islam and Shariat. There is no Islam in Swat. The Taliban have finished it.

woman from Mingawera, Swat, in a Sawabai camp

Where does one begin to tell you what they have been saying? It is difficult to explain because it is difficult for some of us to believe, to understand, and at times, even to empathise with. Between their rage and their tears, between giving each other solace and laughing at lighter moments, they opened up to talk to us. They shall not be named but they shall be heard by all of us today.

Continue reading There is no Islam in Swat. The Taliban have finished it.

‘Stupid’, it’s the local dynamics that matter most…

By Sahar Gul

Courtesy: Airra

At this crucial time when there is need of uniting nation around the single national interest of providing relief to the IDPs and successfully annihilating the Taliban in the Malakand division and restoring peace in the region, the discourse by some people to equate Taliban with the Pashtun nationalist agenda seems nothing but an effort to create startling diversion which no doubt ultimately hampers the attempts to eliminate extremism from Pakistan.

Continue reading ‘Stupid’, it’s the local dynamics that matter most…

What do people in Buner think about ongoing war?

By Zar Ali Khan Musazai

About 3 million people from restive Swat, Buner and Dir migrated to comparatively safer areas of Mardan, Swabi, Nowshera, Charsadda, Peshawar and some others in down Pakistan , a small number where these IDPs were restricted to settle or encamp. In other three provinces of Pakistan some political parties and individuals opposed the entry of IDPs from Pashtun areas.

Continue reading What do people in Buner think about ongoing war?

The real threat for Pakistan is from the enemies within

From News post of today’s The News, Monday, June 01, 2009

The army in Bahrain

by Zubair Torwali, From Bahrain and now in Islamabad

Bahrain is a scenic town in upper Swat generally known as Swat Kohistan. Swat Kohistan comprises the narrow valley beyond Madyan, another scenic town in upper Swat. Bahrain is the main business hub of the adjacent villages with a collective population of over 90,000. The people of Swat Kohistan are ethnically distinct from the rest of Swat. The people of Bahrain speak Torwali while the people of Kalam have their own language called Gawri. The people of both the communities have their own culture as well. The whole valley beyond Madyan is the most visited tourist resort with its tributary valleys such as Daral, Jabba, Ushu and Utrot.

On May 28 the Pakistan army entered Bahrain and was greeted by the local people who came forward with white flags and kept on chanting “Pak Fauj Zindabad’. This is unique in that something like this has happened for the first time in the whole of the troubled Swat valley. It was also unique as Bahrain had been under the control of the Taliban since the beginning of April. When the brave soldiers of the Pakistan army saw this scene they also became emotional and began chanting slogans in favour of the army and the people. The people were so happy at this spectacle of the state forces that they happily carried the ammunition, guns and other luggage of the soldiers to their positions. Even a big gun was carried by 20 local people to a small hilltop above the main town of Bahrain . This was a pleasant surprise for the army as they thought that the people would despise them because, they say, they have gone through such experiences in some parts of the tortured valley.

The people and the soldiers later mixed with each other and exchanged stories. The soldiers then flocked to the shops in order to get the SIM cards of the sole functional cell phone provider. Those who are still in Bahrain told me that initially a curfew was imposed but seeing the enthusiasm and warmth of the people it was lifted after two hours. The locals have even tried to invite the soldiers for dinner despite the fact that food is still short in the whole area. In the wake of this, the army has abandoned shelling of the area and whenever they shell the nearby hills they inform the people before. The people are so jubilant that they have now forgotten about the food crisis and really regard the army as true saviours. This change is important because initially in the previous phases of the military operation — carried out last year and the year before that — the people were most disheartened by what they saw the army’s ambiguity regarding the Taliban militants. And it is in that context that what has happened in Bahrain must be replicated in the whole valley. The war against the militants can only be won by winning the hearts and minds of the local population — and this has been done in Bahrain .

And this will be done only if the armed forces realise that their only real assets are the people of Pakistan and not those who have till now been regarded as ‘assets’ against India or Afghanistan. The real threat for Pakistan is from the enemies within. Of course, there is one major flaw with the current operation and that is of intelligence — proved by the fact that no one among the top leadership of the Swat Taliban have yet been arrested or killed. The people of Pakistan pay for a regular well-equipped and trained army and therefore they are justified in demanding that the said force carry out its constitutional responsibility to protect them from all enemies — from within or without.

Courtesy: Pakistani e-lists/ e-groups, June 2, 2009

The so-called secret agencies are the root of the problem

by Omar Ali, USA

.. The so-called secret agencies are the root of the problem. The Jihadis are just cannon fodder, used to get even more money from America, threaten India, dominate Afghanistan and (most important) maintain the army’s monopoly of power .. (because in the presence of these “militants”, no one else can possibly govern unless the army stands with them). The average jihadi foot soldier probably thinks he is fighting for Allah, having no idea that he is fighting for GHQ and will be killed when he is worth more dead than alive..

Continue reading The so-called secret agencies are the root of the problem

Pakistan – Big Brother (Punjab) is not allowing IDP Camps

Nawaz Sharif who visited the camps in Mardan only shed crocodile´s tears but practically playing hypocrite role.

***

Punjab not to allow IDP camps

By Dilshad Azeem

Courtesy: The News, Thursday, May 21, 2009

ISLAMABAD: The Punjab government has decided in principle not to allow camps for the internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the province, The News has learnt.

Continue reading Pakistan – Big Brother (Punjab) is not allowing IDP Camps

CANADA GETS TOUGH ON PAKISTAN

Canadian defence minster Peter MacKay names Pakistan as the most dengerous country

OTTAWA – Extremely concerned over the current volatile situation in Pakistan, Canadian Defence Minister Peter MacKay has termed Pakistan as the most dangerous country in the world. “I’m extremely concerned. The instability in Pakistan in my view makes Pakistan the most dangerous country in the world”, MacKay was quoted as saying.

Addressing a press conference at St. John’s MacKay said it was very difficult for the Pakistan Army to quell the insurgency that has engulfed the North West Frontier Province (NWFP) of the country. As long as insurgency is allowed to foster and to incubate inside Pakistan, the problem remains very real, very difficult, he added.

MacKay said the operation against the Taliban and Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan would not yield the desired results until the extremists are rooted out from Pakistan, and some greater strides are made in taking on the insurgency in Afghanistan as well. He also highlighted that beside a surge in deployment of troops in Afghanistan, it was also very necessary to cut-off the supply lines of the Taliban, as only then peace and stability could return to the country.

Continue reading CANADA GETS TOUGH ON PAKISTAN

Pakistan & armed militants – Cure is worse than the disease

by Omar Ali, USA

The real point on which inquiry is needed (but doesnt look very likely) is why things got to this pass? why are thousands of armed militants moving around different parts of Pakistan? if foreign countries have sent them in, then shouldn’t out security agencies have made some attempt to stop this foreign intervention long before it got to this point? If Pakistanis are involved, shouldn’t our security agencies have taken notice of these trends long before they reached the point of civil war? What role did our super duper intelligence agencies play in all this? And given that these agencies have been running the country for most of the last 10 years (and longer), what have they done to improve governance and reorder the state so that the majority of the people have a real stake in the health of the system? And what IS the system they are committed to? We need to know because until we get an open and transparent accounting, this fog of confusion will allow the real criminals to get away TO COMMIT NEW CRIMES, maybe even bigger ones than the last set of stupid policies…

Continue reading Pakistan & armed militants – Cure is worse than the disease

Internally Displaced Persons of Pakistan

For Internally Displaced Persons of Pakistan

More than a million peace loving people of Swat, Malakand, Buner and Dir have chosen the way to sacrifice the lives of their beloved family members, their homes and belongings, and the assets built over generations, for the sake of Peace and Security of Pakistan and its implications for the whole world. A recent UN report indicates this Internal Displacement of well over one million souls as the biggest in the past fifteen years

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Pakistan conflict map

A map produced by the BBC suggests only 38% of Pakistan’s North West Frontier Province (NWFP) and surrounding areas is under full government control.

The map, compiled by the BBC’s Urdu language service, was based on local research and correspondent reports as well as conversations with officials. It shows the Taleban strengthening their hold across the north-west.

Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari rejected the findings, telling the BBC it was an “incorrect survey”.

He was speaking after talks in London with UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown, who pledged £12m ($18m) in humanitarian aid for north-west Pakistan.

Mr Zardari said the two countries were united in fighting the threat to their countries’ democratic way of life, and also repeated assurances that his country’s arsenal was in safe hands.

There was an international outcry recently when the militants moved into Buner district, just 100km (67 miles) from Islamabad.

Pakistan has continued its military offensive to regain control of the region, and has reported the deaths of 11 militants in the Swat valley in the past 24 hours.

Residents trapped in Mingora, the main town in Swat, told AFP news agency by telephone that militants had planted mines and were digging trenches.

“People are becoming mentally ill, our senses have shut down, children and woman are crying, please tell the government to pull us out of here,” said one shopkeeper, who did not want to give his name.

“Forget the lack of electricity and other problems, the Taleban are everywhere and heavy exchanges of fire are routine at night.”

Mapping lawlessness

The report the BBC map was based on covered the 24 districts of NWFP and the seven tribal agencies and six frontier regions of the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA).

nts over the past 18 months, backed up by conversations with local officials, police officers and journalists.

They concluded that in 24% of the region, the civilian government no longer had authority and Taleban commanders had taken over administrative controls.

Either the Taleban were in complete control or the military were engaged in operations to flush them out.

Another 38% of the region was deemed to have a permanent Taleban presence, meaning militants had established rural bases which were restricting local government activities and seriously compromising local administration.

In those areas – three districts in FATA and 11 in NWFP – the Taleban had repeatedly shown their capability to strike at will, says the report.

Militants had made their presence felt by carrying out periodic attacks on girls’ schools, music shops, police stations and government buildings.

The map gives a snapshot of the current situation. However continuing fighting between Pakistani troops and the Taleban means the situation on the ground could change in the future.

The Pakistani army’s spokesman, Gen Athar Abbas, rejected the BBC map as “grossly exaggerated”.

“The ground situation doesn’t give any indicator of such influence or control of Taleban in this area,” he told the BBC in Rawalpindi.

Thousands flee

The region is notorious for its lack of law and order, so the researchers applied a series of rules to differentiate Taleban activity from general lawlessness.

The incidents had to be of a recurring nature, there had to be an official recognition of Taleban presence, Taleban militants must have appointed local “commanders” and religious schools sympathetic to the militants must be operating in the area.

Pakistan has been stepping up its campaign against the Taleban in the north-west.

Tens of thousands of people have fled from the region to escape the fighting.

The research also indicates areas to which researchers believe Taleban-style militancy may further spread inside Pakistan.

The report found that, based on current perceptions of religiously motivated violence, there were strong indications that in 47% of Punjab Province there was a high likelihood of an increase in Taleban militancy in the near future.

The BBC’s Barbara Plett in Islamabad says that while the research indicates the strength of the Taleban in the region, the various factions and groups are only loosely co-ordinated.

Observers have warned against overstating the existence of one unified insurgency against the state, says our correspondent.

Are you living in an area that is not entirely controlled by the government? How does the Taleban affect your daily life? Send us your comments and stories using the form below.

Courtesy: BBC

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8047504.stm

Pakistan: Struggling to See a Country of Shards

By SABRINA TAVERNISE

LAHORE, Pakistan — On a spring night in Lahore, I came face to face with all that is puzzling about Pakistan.

I had just interviewed Mobarak Haidar, a Pakistani author who was confidently predicting the end of the world. Islamic extremism, he said, was a wild animal that would soon gobble up Europe and all of Western civilization. “All the world’s achievements for the past 500 years are at risk,” he said in a gloomy tone, sitting in his living room. Soon there would be no more music, dancing or fun of any kind. The power went out and candles were lit, adding to the spookiness.

And then, as I climbed into a car to go home, a wedding party came out of nowhere, enveloping us in a shower of rose petals. Men playing bagpipes marched toward us, grinning, while dancing guests wriggled and clapped, making strange-shaped silhouettes in our headlights.

So which is the real Pakistan? Collapsing state or crazy party?

The answer is both, which is why this country of 170 million people is so hard to figure out.

Pakistan has several selves. There is rural Pakistan, where two-thirds of the country lives in conditions that approximate the 13th century. There is urban Pakistan, where the British-accented, Princeton-educated elite sip cold drinks in clipped gardens.

The rugged mountains of the west are inhabited by fiercely tribal Pashtuns, many of whom live without running water or electricity; there, an open Taliban insurgency seems beyond the central government’s control. In the lush plains of Punjab in the east, the insurgency is still underground, and the major highways are as smooth as any in the American Midwest.

The place where these two areas meet is the front line of Pakistan’s war — valleys and towns less than 100 miles from the country’s capital, Islamabad. Taliban militants, whose talk is part Marx, part mullah, but whose goal is power, now occupy this area. In recent weeks they pushed into Buner, even closer to the capital, and last week the military, after weeks of inaction, began a drive against them.

The war, in a way, is a telling clash between Pakistan’s competing impulses, so different that they are hard to see together in the same frame.

“It’s like when people try to take snapshots, but the contrast is too sharp,” said Feisal Naqvi, a Lahore-based lawyer. “You only capture a little bit of the real picture.”

Islam is perhaps the only constant in this picture. Pakistan, after all, was established in 1947 so the Muslims of the subcontinent would have their own country after independence from Britain. The rest became India, a multifaith, Hindu-majority constitutional republic.

But Pakistan didn’t declare itself an Islamic republic until 1956. In its early years, Pakistan’s liberals will remind you, Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the country’s founder, delivered two speeches in which he said that Pakistan would not be a theocracy and that citizens of other religions would be free to practice.

Nevertheless, Islam became a powerful glue for the new nation; subsequent leaders, civilian and military, relied on it to stick the patchwork of ethnicities and tribes together. Then, like a genie out of a bottle, it took a direction all its own. “Once you bring Islam into politics, it’s hard to handle,” Mr. Naqvi said. “You don’t have the tools to control it.”

Young countries have long memories, and Pakistanis have not forgotten (or forgiven) the actions of the United States since the 1980s, when its spy agency, together with Pakistan’s own, backed Islamists fighting the Soviet Union in Afghanistan. Soon after the Soviets left, Washington withdrew its aid to Pakistan, and the Islamists were left with their own safe haven.

“The Americans just walked out, and Pakistan became the most sanctioned state in the world,” said Najam Sethi, editor of The Daily Times, a newspaper. “That has now created a powder keg of sympathy for the Taliban.”

Like splinters in fingers, these memories continue to irritate. They came tumbling out in a candle-lit room (again, no power) full of journalists in Muzaffargarh, a town in southern Punjab where militants had recently issued threats. Instead of hearing about those threats, though, I was reminded of grievances against America.

Courtesy: The New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/03/weekinreview/03tavernise.html?_r=1

US gives Pakistan two weeks time to eliminate Taliban

Courtesy: The Economic Times, 1 May 2009

WASHINGTON : Stepping up pressure on Pakistan to take concrete action against the Taliban, the US has given Islamabad two weeks time to eliminate the insurgents from its soil before Washington determines what it will do next.

General David Petraeus, who heads the US Central Command, has told US officials that the coming two weeks would be “critical to determining whether the Pakistani government will survive”, Fox News reported.

Continue reading US gives Pakistan two weeks time to eliminate Taliban

Pakistan must be saved from collapse

by KEVIN Rudd
April 29th, 2009
Wichaar.com
KEVIN Rudd rightly linked Australia’s increased troop commitment to Afghanistan with a desire to ensure the viability of the Pakistani state. He identified this as a vital interest for Australia. Like US President Barack Obama, Rudd has appointed a special envoy — in this case former Defence Department head Ric Smith — for Afghanistan and Pakistan.

That Rudd questions the viability of the Pakistani state should alert Australians to the perfect storm of trouble in Pakistan today. It is the worst and most dangerous security situation in the world, albeit with strong competition from Iran and with North Korea putting in a serious effort. Don’t think I’m being alarmist. Last week, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told Congress that the security situation in Pakistan “poses a mortal threat to the security and safety of our country and the world”. She added: “The Pakistani Government is basically abdicating to the Taliban and the extremists … we cannot underscore the seriousness of the existential threat posed to the state of Pakistan.”

Continue reading Pakistan must be saved from collapse

The Roots of Extremism

by: Isa

The common belief in Pakistan is that Islamic radicalism is a problem only in FATA, and that madrassas are the only jihad factories around. This is seriously wrong. Extremism is breeding at a ferocious rate in religious schools within towns and cities. Left unchallenged, this education will produce a generation incapable of living together with any except strictly their own kind. The mindset it produces may eventually lead to Pakistan’s demise as a nation state.

Courtesy: Sindhi e-lists/ e-groups.

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

A thought provoking article on Pakistan politics

by Omar Ali

This is from an army officer who wishes to remain anonymous… ..I would say this represents a version of theory number one (“things fall apart”)…

a. In my view there are various over-lapping layers of motivation that are fueling the insurgency, or vouchsafing, if not active sympathy for its cause, then at least, certainly much benign indifference. In ascending order these are :

1. Religious motivation. 2.Revenge. 3.Military occupation.

4.Anti-Americanism. This sentiment is very strong among all sections of the population, and has grown with each new attack against a Muslim country, whether this was done by the US; or by Israel. After the last attack on Gaza, if there were any doubts about where the US stood vis a vis Muslims, these were flooded over.

5. But the essential glue that unites all of the above together is the feeling of deprivation and injustice among the ‘have nots’ which has been built up over the last 60 years of one more atrocious government succeeding the other. So if the average Pakistani is not sympathetic towards the militants, he is certainly not in favour of the establishment. But in among an amazingly high proportion of people who share this sentiment, it does not seem to be there at the conscious level–one can only reach it and dredge it up by questioning people. But this will not long be the case. It is only a matter of time before one of the militant leaders will openly espouse the cause of the have-not, and give it words. When that happens, it will spread like wild fire.

b.The army is more infected by this have-not sentiment than any other. And the jawan, who must translate the generals’ plans into action, has no enthusiasm for it. When this is combined with poor leadership, and the natural aversion to killing their own people, you have perfected the recipe for inaction. All too often, in case of the army, one mistakes pure incompetence for conspiracy.

The thinking within the army reflects completely the thinking that pervades that of the general population. The few in the army who would like to take on the militants, have their commitment doused by their suspicioin of the real motives of the US. The ISI and MI briefings to the high command, as long ago as 4 years, were quite specific in that, that the insurgency in Baluchistan was being fueled directly by the US, UK, and India. When such is the belief of those who are to fight

the Taliban, it is very difficult for them to invest their effort against the militants with any great degree of commitment and enthusiasm.

c. The army is too bloody incompetent to even think about the slow burn strategy, much less, put it into practice.

d.There is something not quite generally known about the militancy. We know that the roughest and toughest part of our population comes from FATA. Among these the most unreconstructed are the Wazirs and Mahsuds of Waziristan. It may come as news to you that these two latter tribes were terrified of the Uzbeks. And the Uzbeks, in turn were absolutley

terrified of the “Kala” Taliban i.e the Taliban coming from Karachi, and southern and central Punjab. In my view therefore, it is not a question of whether Punjab will eventually fall to religious conglomerations [not necessarily Taliban], but the question is that of

‘when’.

d.Militancy is not the disease. It is the symptom of the disease, which is malignant governance. And of this the ugliest manifestation is corruption in high places. I thought I had already seen the worst face of corruption, till this government took power. They are so bad, I have not the words to do their knavery, justice. Quite literally, the NRO has legalised corruption. I have asked some journalists if they are mindful of how thoroughly corruption rules the roost, and if so, why are so quiet on the issue. In two cases the answer I received was absolutely chilling i.e ‘ in earlier goverments, exposure of corruption could lead to false cases, or roughing up by police goons in civies–but today we are being ruled by a gangsters, and our punishment will be assassination!!”

Unless we get good and dedicated governance in Pakistan, and get it soon, not all the drone attacks are going to save us.

Courtesy: – CRDP, Apr 28, 2009

Taliban- The fast-moving destructive force

by Khalid Hashmani, McLean, Virginia, USA
A segment with students, teachers, and recruiters of a Madraso in Karachi conveys the seriousness of the situation. ..Should we be doing anything to stop this fast-moving destructive force or simply lie low in the hope that this is a temporary phenomenon which will pass away in due course? ..
To watch the video, please click here

Continue reading Taliban- The fast-moving destructive force

Taliban arranging love marriages (Is it TRUE?!)

Taliban in Pak’s Swat arranging ‘love marriages’

Press Trust Of India – Islamabad, April 19, 2009 -Taliban militants in Pakistan’s northwestern Swat valley have set up a special bureau for arranging “love marriages” for couples barred by their families from tying the knot with partners of their choice.

The bureau named ‘Shuba-e-Aroosat´, which is headed by Taliban commander Abu Ammad, has arranged 11 “love marriages” in the past nine days, militant spokesman Muslim Khan was quoted as saying by BBC Urdu service.

Another 300 men and women are waiting for their turn to marry. “The love marriage aspirants contact the bureau on a fixed telephone number. The Taliban collect their particulars and then contact their families to arrange these marriages,” Khan said.

Islam allows every adult to marry according to his own choice, he said. “Most of the girls or their families who contacted us wished to marry militant Taliban,” Khan claimed.

Some analysts said the Taliban were paving the way for militants to marry women of their choice. Some people have also questioned how the militants could allow the flogging of men and women for being seen together in public while at the same time facilitating the youth to marry according to their own choice.

Courtesy: Hindustan Times

Source- Link –
http://www.hindustantimes.com/StoryPage/StoryPage.aspx?sectionName=RSSFeed-World&id=6ff62656-dfe1-42eb-bb45-1245744172a0&Headline=Taliban+%20in+Swat+arrangin%20g+%27love+marriage%20s%E2%80%99

What is the difference between a suicide bomber and a suicidal government?

April 24th, 2009
By B. R. Gowani
Courtesy: Globeistan
A suicide bomber is a person who thinks, or has been indoctrinated to think, that he (mostly it is men) has a higher goal to accomplish and so he does not care for his own life and, of course, for other lives. And when he embarks on a mission he destroys a particular target (place, people, or thing) and in the process gets killed.

On the other hand, a suicidal government is a body of people corrupted by the system who think only of embellishing their and their near ones’ lives and riches. And when it embarks on this mission it destroys the whole country. Unlike the suicide bombers, the leaders do not get killed-they flee to other countries.

Pakistani leaders are on one such fatal mission. Those from the elite class (the politicians, bureaucrats, defense personnel, business people, and others) who haven’t yet been influenced by the Taleban-Islam must have a plan to head off to England, the US, and the UAE.

Continue reading What is the difference between a suicide bomber and a suicidal government?

What is happening in Pakistan?

By: Omar Ali
I recently went on a road trip across the North-Eastern United States and at every stop, the Pakistanis I met were talking about the situation in Pakistan. As is usually the case, everyone seemed to have their own pet theory, but for a change ALL theories shared at least two characteristics: they were all pessimistic in the short term and none of them believed the “official version” of events. Since there seems to be no consensus about the matter, a friend suggested that I should summarize the main theories I heard and circulate that document, asking for comments.. So here, in no particular order, are the different theories.

Continue reading What is happening in Pakistan?

Taliban Advance: Is Pakistan Nearing Collapse?

Wichaa.com
by ARYN BAKER
April 23rd, 2009
The move by Taliban-backed militants into the Buner district of northwestern Pakistan, closer than ever to Pakistan’s capital of Islamabad, have prompted concerns both within the country and abroad that the nuclear-armed nation of 165 million is on the verge of inexorable collapse.

Continue reading Taliban Advance: Is Pakistan Nearing Collapse?

Columnist’s opinion

By Selig S. Harrison
Courtesy: USATODAY
Unless the Obama administration can get Pakistan’s army to stop supporting the Taliban with weapons and logistical support, the insurgency will continue to threaten the U.S.-supported Kabul government – no matter how many more troops the U.S. sends to Afghanistan.

Continue reading Columnist’s opinion

The Proxy War

BY K.M.KOLACHI, TORONTO, CANADA

The writer can be reached at kmkolachi@yahoo.com

Khalistan was an issue a few years ago but it is not any more. When the lobbies behind it withdrew the support, it came to an end. Similarly MMA suddenly became a political force but in a few years, it also disappeared. Issues are created whenever needed and kept alive until required.
Talibization is also an issue created by powerful lobbies of establishment to gain control of Afghanistan after Soviet unions defeat. Now it is being used as resistance against American advancement and influence. It will remain active till it is required. Due to Talibization, U.S.A. is giving money to the establishment of this country.

Continue reading The Proxy War

“Taliban” a threat to sufi society

by Khalid Hashmani, McLean, Virginia, USA
I agree with the  observations and inferences about so called inability of security forces to defeat few thousand Taliban. Indeed, the rulers of Pakistan think that this game lets them secure much-needed “big bugs”. However, the menace of “Taliban” and its threat to sufi Islam in the long run cannot be under-estimated.

Continue reading “Taliban” a threat to sufi society

Three Cups of Tea

Talibanization is not a mere threat. It is a clear and present danger that has already hit our cities and villages alike.
by Mohammad Ali Mahar, Austin, TX, USA

The writer can be reached at mamahar@hotmail.com
I was reading a book, “Three Cups of Tea”, which is based on the true story of a mountaineer who got lost in the wilderness of Himalayas in the early 1990s and ended up being in a small village named Khorpe – the last Pakistani settlement at the feet of the mighty mountain range . I am not going to repeat the whole biographic account of Greg Mortenson, the mountaineer, here. However, it was at that time that he saw the scourge of Talibanization worming its way into the Pakistani society. If a complete stranger could see it coming, and predicting the outcome, was it merely an intelligence failure that Pakistani security agencies could not see Taliban building a strong foothold in the country?
Drive from Karachi to Rohri on any given day and you will see busloads of Afghanis with turbans and beards, and who knows what in their luggage, driving into Sindhi cities. Go to Sohrab Goth area and you would think you were in Kabul. Sometime back, a Pukhtun (an Afghan refugee, and, who knows, a Taliban?) even tried to grab a previous piece of land on the Gorakh Hill!
Also, please read Dr. Manzur Ijaz’s column to see how these Taliban are making inroad to even the far flung areas of Thar.
I would be blind if I could not see Taliban’s intentions of taking over Sindh, and the rest of the country, authorities permitting.

Continue reading Three Cups of Tea

Sindhiyat is under attack

by Nazia Junejo, Salt lake city, USA
The writer can be reached at najunejo@yahoo.com
I do not think this could be regarded as a warning sign any more. It seems like the dreaded is already here. Our Sindhiyat was already under attack from MQM, feudals and the government (regardless of the rulers), now this new monster seems determined to engulf whatever pieces of culture and civilization we are left with. The rule of the world is to move forward ie time and tide wait for no one. The nations which got independence with us like China or India have been advancing steadily to the extent of becoming leading economies of the world. Where are we and why? Unfortuantely our nation being in the grip of so called Maulvis in one form or the other have been persistent in slowing us down. Now the recent wave of Talibanization seems to drive us even backwards to the pre historic era. I agree ,as any reasonable woman/man would. It has nothing to do with Islam or Shariah. It has to do with gaining a dangerous coercive power to satisfy murderous and barbaric instincts of a bunch of illiterate losers. We can no longer afford to sit as silent spectators in the hope of a miracle.We can also not afford to let a revolution arise from inside Sindh. The people there, as I take it are too pre occupied with efforts to combat daily life disruptions with power failures, mobile phone snatching, broken roads, corruptions in every field…. They are already overwhelmed and hence unable to deal with this new crisis-like situation. Some of them may not even see it as a crisis.  I am sure SANA could at least spread awareness regarding this impending disaster. It is ironic that the so called bill to surrender the population of Swat to the mercy of bunch of lunatics was not opposed by one sensible individual in the parliament.I am actually grateful to those Maulvis for not asking for the entire country YET. Unless they revoke the ‘peace deal’and bring the area under a humane law,this infiltration of maulvis must be stopped. One way to do it might be to declare tribal areas including Swat as an independent state with strict visa rules. After all, an organ with cancer sometimes has to be removed to save the entire body.

I have different opinion on the Talibanization of Sindh

I have different view point on the matter
by K.M.KOLACHI, Toronto, Canada
Present issue of Talibization has been raised by a ethnic group as defensive move to retain control on the area. They see danger to Sindh on the migration of pashtuns but they cover the illegal immigration from India till to date. They also used their influence to get the Bengali population in Karachi regularized.

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Taliban influence in bureaucracy

By A. Ameer
Saturday, 18 Apr, 2009
Courtesy: daily Dawn
THE growing threat of violent extremism in different parts of Pakistan including Fata and Malakand Division is a matter of serious concern.

The harrowing factor is that the writ of the Taliban is solidifying both in the north and the south not only in the Pashtun belt but also in the heartland of Pakistan.

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