Tag Archives: Sub-continent

Nations’ right to self-determination

By Manzoor Chandio

1. All peoples have the right of self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development.

2. All peoples may, for their own ends, freely dispose of their natural wealth and resources without prejudice to any obligations arising out of international economic co-operation, based upon the principle of mutual benefit, and international law. In no case may a people be deprived of its own means of subsistence.

3. The States Parties to the present Covenant, including those having responsibility for the administration of Non-Self-Governing and Trust Territories, shall promote the realization of the right of self-determination, and shall respect that right, in conformity with the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations.

MANY people wish that Pakistan’s best course for the future is democracy, provincial autonomy and control of resources by people who own them. This demand is often repeated in each seminar and conference by all and sundry.

They forget that provincial autonomy was envisaged in the Pakistan Resolution in 1940, democracy was promised by Quiad-i-Azam in 1947 and the control of resources by abolishing the Concurrent List in 1973. But this did not happen.

These concepts may have been effective immediately after the partition, but they are now nothing more than a huge drag.

Federal parties like the PPP and the PML-N may think this is still a pipe dream. Implementation of these systems now seems to be a dream gone sore.

But nationalists from smaller provinces say now this 21st century and ideas of provincial autonomy and decentralization promised in 20th century have become irrelevant.

Now there is talk that the problem of Baloch people is not provincial autonomy or share in natural resources and constitutional rights in the framework of Pakistan, but the right to self-determination and self-rule. They think ongoing struggle is liberation movement against the state slavery.

Over the years questions have been asked whether the integrity of the federation of Pakistan is in jeopardy over the growing disparity between the federating units and to what extent do the people from provinces other than Punjab have disliking for the over-centralised federal set-up.

The people of the smaller provinces are calling names for many of their woes and appalling inequalities within and between the provinces.

Ironically, there is an air of insouciance in Punjab because of its sheer size and military might.

There is a common perception in Pakistan that the country is some 200 years back of the West. In Sindh, it is believed that the province’s rural hinterland is some 50 years back of Punjab.

Both perceptions might be true in the sense that Pakistan has not yet developed as the first-class modern institutions to be included in the list of developed countries.

It still imports aeroplans, automobiles, computers and many military and non-military equipment and gadgets.

The rural hinterland of Sindh still can not produce electric fans and motors which are brought from Gujarat and Gujranwala, sport kits from Sialkot, cutlery buts from Wazirabad and fabric from Faisalabad.

Thousand of tube-wells and water pumps installed across Sindh are also brought from Punjab. The entire country depends on agricultural implements like land levelers, ploughs, thrashers made in Punjab.

Even the tractors engines are first brought to Karachi then transported to Lahore and after being assembled there marketed in the country. Many daily use things like soaps and toothpaste are produced in Punjab and marketed in Sindh.

It is a big tragedy Sindh even can not produce electric buttons which are house-made items in Punjab. With the industrialization of central Punjab, millions of the people of Punjab have changed their mode of production from agriculture to industry.

While Sindhis are still associated with the centuries old mode of production—the agriculture.

In the armed forces, Punjab has acquainted itself with the nuclear bomb making to fly F-16 and operate the most frigates. While Sindhis have still to make DIGs and IGs.

Why Punjab is 50 years ahead of Sindh? There are many theories being discussed among the new emerging educated class in Sindh.

A look at the federation’s employing intuitions shows how most of the bodies are out of bounds for people from the two provinces.

The Pakistan Army, which also enjoys considerable influence in the decision-making, has earned the preferred nomenclature in the two provinces as the Punjab Army because it does not have proportional representation from all ethnic groups.

Many eyebrows are being raised on Dr Ayesha Siddiqa’s book ‘the Military Inc.’ that how nine per cent of Pakistan’s population controls unprecedented share in the national economy.

But she did not elaborate that Sindhis and the Baloch, whose combined representation in Pakistan’s military is very low, have not stakes in the Pakistan Military Inc., the country’s biggest corporate conglomerate.

The two nations have no representation in the Frontier Works Organisation, (the largest construction company), the National Logistic Cell (the largest transport company), DHAs (one of the Pakistan’s largest land owners) and airlines, bakeries, cinemas and gas stations that had been set up by the armed forces.

Factories, industries and firms established by military subsidiaries—the Fauji Foundation, Bahria Foundation and Shaheen Foundation –virtually remain out of bounds for Sindhis and Baloch.

If we look at the Pakistan civil services, only one province rules the roost.

The Senate of Pakistan was told in 2006 that Punjab occupies 116 out of total 179 secretary-level posts in federal government departments. The NWFP stood second with 31 high-ranking officers, Sindh has 19 officers and Balochistan has the lowest representation in civil bureaucracy with only one secretary and two joint secretaries.

In Sindh police, purely a provincial subject, thousands of officials are recruited from Punjab. It is being argued that any Pakistani from any part of the country can work anywhere. If so is the argument then how many Sindhis and the Baloch had been inducted in the Punjab police? There is an army of jobless youth in the two provinces. Will the Punjab government give them jobs as a token of harmony and to prove that Punjab is also a part of Pakistan?

The Pakistan Cricket Board has yet to select any Sindhi or Baloch in the national cricket team. Isn’t there a single youth in Sindh and Balochistan who can run in the ground at the speed of ball?

The Pakistan Hockey Federation has been made an exclusive sport of youth from Punjab. There is not a single Sindhi or Baloch player in the hockey team which happens to be the national sport of the country.

At present, statistics paint a dismal picture of the representation of Sindhis and the Baloch in the Foreign Office and diplomatic machines abroad. Sindh being the province which in the past had produced great statesmen, diplomats and constitutionalists like Mohammed Ali Jinnah, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto and Hafeez Pirzado can not have diplomats of lower grade if we do not talk about ambassadors, first secretaries and attaché.

The world has entered a paradigm in which the ideas of human capital are being given priority over all other theories. But here in this country people are still being pushed against the wall and deprived their equal rights.

Now the question is being raised: Is this country an exclusive domain of one province or one group of people in which others have no equal say?

July 28, 2008

Coutesy: SouthAsiaTimesblogspot.com

http://www.southasiatimes.blogspot.com/

Sindhi language has ancient links with Sub-continent

Sindhi is an ancient language; over seventy percent of Sindhi words are Sanskrit. The fact that Sindhi is mostly written in the Arabic script, gives some people the impression that it is a Persio-Arabic tongue..

DR ANNEMARIE Schimmel, Harvard professor of Islamics, and versatile linguist writes: “Since every word in Sindhi ends in a vowel, the sound is very musical.” The treasures of the ancient Sindhi literature, of the immortal Sufi poet-saints, Shah, Sachal, Sami or the saints of Modern India: Sadhu TLVaswani, sung in sweet, melodious, rhythmic Sindhi tunes, fills the hearts and souls of the listeners with sheer rapture, joy and ecstasy. The Sindhis of India don’t have a land, nation or state to call their own. They are a scattered community, spread all over India, and in most countries of the world. If there is one thing that will help them retain their identity, it is the language. Unfortunately Sindhis have neglected their mother tongue, and if we don’t use the language, we will lose it. Language is the root of our community. Language is the soul of our community. If the soul is lost, how long can the community last?

Diwan Thakudas Pribhdas, advocate of Hyderabad said: “The language is probably, so far as its grammatical construction is concerned, the purest daughter of Sanskrit. It has a sprinkling of Dravidian words, and has in later times received large accessions to its vocabulary from Arabic and Persian.”

Sindhi language has evolved over a period of two millennia; with waves of invasions by Greeks, Arabs, Arghuns, Tarkhans, Scythians, Turks, Mughals and so on. Sindh, on the north west of undivided India, had always been the first to bear the onslaught of the never-ending invaders, and as such absorbed Hindi, Persian, Arabic, Turkish, English and even Portuguese words. The language of the people of Sindh has a solid base of Prakrit and Sanskrit, showing great susceptibility towards borrowings from Arabic, Persian, and Dravidian (such as Brahui in Baluchistan) . Sindh was the seat of the ancient Indus valley civilization during the third millennium BC as discovered from the Mohen-jo-Daro excavation. The pictographic seals and clay tablets obtained from these excavations still await proper deciphering by epigraphists

Sindhis in India have made their mark. Eminent Sindhis include Jairamdas Doulatram, LK Advani, Parso T Malani, Nari Hiranandani, Ashok Advani, Hindujas, Rahejas. Sindhi’s have 17 colleges and 19 hospitals and many others institutions.

Dr Lila Harchandani of Hyderabad, Sind, in her book ‘The Scattered Treasure’ has an interesting logic to back her theory. According to her some scholars confused the words Prakrita (meaning=natural) with the word Purakrita (meaning-formed first), which misled them. In the same way, she says, due to affinity towards Hinduism, litterateurs like Kishinchand Jetley translated a couplet from Sindhi poet, Shah Abdul Latif’s poetry into Sanskrit and concluded that the similarity shows the derivation of Sindhi from Sanskrit. She rightly argues that it could be the other way round too and cites two authorities to elucidate this point. One is Siraj-ul-Haq of Pakistan who states:

“The history of Sindhi is older than that of Sanskrit and its related civilization or culture are derived from the civilization or culture of Sindh and from Sindhi language…Sanskrit is born of Sindhi – if not directly, at least indirectly.”

Sindh is where Persian and Indian cultures blended, for the area was introduced to Islam in 712 AD. Thus, very little of Sindhi literature of the earlier period has survived. The Summara and Summa periods are virtually blank except for the few poems of Hamad, Raju and Isack. The heroic ballads of this period set to music by Shah Abdul Karim (1538-1625) are the earliest records of the Sindhi language.

Real flourish of Sindhi poetic talent came during the last stages of the 18th century. Although the time was not appropriate for cultural developments as invaders repeatedly plundered the country during this period. Several works like Shah Abdul Latif’s ‘Shah-Jo-Rasalo’ , the magnum opus of Sindhi literature, were produced.

It describes the life of a common man, the sorrows and sufferings of the ill-starred heroes of ancient folklore. Sachal, another eminent poet closely followed Shah Abdul Karim. He was a Sufi rebel poet who did not adhere to any religion and denounced religious radicals. The poet, Saami, was a complete contrast to Kari, more pious than poetical, yet possessing a charm of his own. There was an excess of songsters in Sindhi who recited similar ideas and themes in varied tones. The notable among them are Bedil, his son Bekas, and Dalpat. Gul Mohamad introduced Persian forms of poetry replacing the native baits and kafees. Mirza Kaleech

Other Articles by Ramesh Manghirmalani

Beg who composed on the same lines contributed a lot to Sindhi literature.

Dayaram Gidumal and Mirza Kaleech were two of the early prose writers. The former was a great scholar and he was famous mainly for his metaphysical writings. The noted lexicographer and essayist, Parmanand Mewaram, wrote essays that educated and instructed both young and the old. This peer group also comprised of Bherumal Meherchand, Lalchand Amardinomal and Jethmal Parsram and Acharya Gidwani, NR Malkani and Dr HM Gurbuxani.Tikamdas Wadumal Mansukhani, Bar-at-law from Qeens College, become first Mayor of Karachi, ZA Bhutto and Syed Sharifuddin Pirzada were legal associates in Karachi.

Courtesy: http://www.merinews.com/catFull. jsp?articleID= 137849

Nirmala’s ashes immersed in Indus

By Waseem Shamsi

SUKKUR, May 17, 2008: The ashes of Nirmala Deshpande, an Indian peace and human rights activist, were immersed in the Indus River at the steps of the Sadhu Bela temple on Saturday. The peace activist had said in her will that her ashes should be immersed in all rivers in South Asia.

A 250-member delegation representing the India-Pakistan peace committee, whose members arrived here from different parts of Pakistan, participated in the ceremony to pay homage to Nirmala Deshpande for her efforts for making South Asia a peaceful region for all nations.

Respected internationally, Nirmala Deshpande played a leading role in various peace movements in South Asia over the last six decades.

It was her desire to make South Asia a region free of nuclear weapons. She also played a key role for bringing people of different religions closer to each other.

The peace committee delegation was led by secretary Karamat Ali and attended by member Miss Anoosha Alam and her nine-year-old daughter Nisa Alam.

Nirmala Deshpande had desired in her will a young girl should be employed for performing the immersion ceremony.

In accordance with the will, the ceremony was led by little Nisa Alam. Immersing ceremonies for Nirmala’s ashes have already been performed at Ganges and Jumuna and other rivers in South Asian countries.

Courtesy: Daily Dawn

Asha Chand is a daughter of prominent and well known Sindhi writer Sundri Uttamchandani

By Ramesh Kateja, India

Ms. Asha is daughter of prominent and well known Sindhi writer par excellence Madam Sundri Uttamchandani, who has scores of Sindhi Novels and Stories to her credit, many of those have been translated in numerous languages globally.

In spite of constraints Sindhi language is facing in India, when the language can only survive through spoken medium, Ms Asha’s initiative to produce sleek and smooth Sindhi programmes for television media is indeed commendable and is certainly a right step in right direction.

Although Half an hour a week is too small a slot allotted for Sindhi ( i am sure that too must have been some kind of favour) is good enough for time being.

Its my appeal to Sindhis worldwide to encourage their children to see these TV programmes and create interest in their mind for their Mother Tongue. When I remember those lines of some Indian Sindhi writer:

Allah, iyen ma thiye, jo kitaaban men paRhije,

Hui Sindh ain Sindhi waaran ji Boli.

Translation of the above poetry: Lord, let that not happen, when we would be reading in the books, There was Sindh and their language Sindhi!

Courtesy: Sindhi e-lists/e-groups, April 14, 2008

Role of SindhWorkis (Sindhi Traders in foreign countries) in Gadar Revolt & INA under Subhash Chandra Bose

The Sindhi Hindu community uprooted as the result of India’s Partition, now girdles the globe. But then for Sindhi traders, globalization was never a new concept. For decades, well before Partition, Sindhi traders (commonly known as SindhWorkis) had established themselves practically in every city of the world, with larger concentration in Japan, Singapore, Hong Kong, Indonesia and Malaysia; through the Middle East to Africa and Gibraltar, and across Britain and Europe to the U.S. and Latin America.

These SindhWorkis or Sindhi traders earned a fine reputation for trustworthiness and honesty in foreign countries. Their word was known as a bond. They supported local, social events and aided worthwhile charities from time to time, locally and in Sindh and India. They were religious and remained steadfast in their family, social and cultural roots and religious identity. Largely their donations were to religious institutions, mandirs (temples) and gurdwaras but many like Bahi Wattumall, Chellarams. Bhai Maghnamal of K A J Chotirmull and many others gave much for educational and social purposes for Sindhis and others.

The SindhWorkis kept a low profile while giving aid and support. As the grand old man heading the Watumalls is said to remark when someone questioned him as to why he does not publicize his charities, he quoted Rahim who was a great philanthropist, “dene wala koi aur hai; log brahm mujh pay kyoun karen!” (Means: Giver is Some One Else – implying that there is some Higher Power that is the Giver – So why should people think that I am the giver?). Later, when Watumalls established the public foundation for Education, naturally their charities had to come out in the open.

By and large SindhWorkis remained aloof from politics. Many suffered almost silently the pain of India for its being a colony of the British but there was no organization worth the name till the first decade of the twentieth century through which they could channel their frustration and funds . A change in the attitude of the SindhWorkis came about with the formation of the Gadar Party early in the second decade of the twentieth century.

Establishment of the Gadar Party:

The Gadar Movement was established around 1912-1913. It was the first organized violent bid for freedom after the uprising (Indian War of Independence) of 1857. Gadar in Punjabi means “revolt” – and indeed this revolt was the saga of courage, valor and determination of overseas Indians to free India from the shackles of British slavery. Clearly, the Gadarites wanted to liberate India by the force of arms. The movement did not achieve its intended objective. However, it awakened a sleeping India and left a major impact on India’s struggle for freedom. The heroism, courage and sacrifices of the Gadarites inspired many freedom fighters to continue their mission. This attempt to free their country was made by Indians living overseas, particularly in the United States and Canada. Although, the overwhelming majority of the Gadarites were Sikhs and the main centers of revolutionary activity were in Canada and the United States, the movement spread to

other centers as well, such as Shanghai, Hong Kong and Singapore. Many of the leaders were of other parties and from different parts of India, and amongst them were Rash Bihari Bose, Barkutullah, Seth Husain Rahim, Tarak Nath Das, Vishnu Ganesh Pingley, Virendra Nath Chattopadhyay (younger brother of politician-poetess Sarojani Naidu), Bhupendra Nath Datta (brother of Swami Vivekananda) , Ajit Singh (uncle of Shahid Bhagat Sigh), and Bhai Bhagwan Singh.

It was as the result of Rash Bihari Bose’s effort that some Sindhis also became sympathizers and helpers of the Gadar Movement. Notable among them were Dr. Choithram P. Gidwani, who was in regular touch with Rash Bihari Bose, not so much by normal correspondence but through messages sent by word of mouth by friendly couriers. Dr. Choithram had introduced quite a few associates to Rash Bihari Bose, and amongst them were two of his close friends Lokram Sharma and his brother Vishnu Sharma. The two Sharma brothers remained in close touch with Rash Bihari Bose. Dr. Choithram had also been in touch with Lala Har Dayal who had been a faculty member at Stanford University in U.S.A. for about two years. He was the central pioneering figure and the force behind the newly formed Gadar organization.

Please note the following extract on page 89 of The Sindh Story by K.R.Malkani (published by Sindhi Academy Delhi):

“One mid-night in 1913, a lame Muslim complaining of severe stomach pain, arrived in a bullock cart from Kotri, at the residence of Lokram Sharma in Hyderabad (Sindh). Once in, it was clear, that he was Rash Bihari Bose, the famous revolutionary in disguise who had thrown a bomb at Lord Hardinge in Chandni Chowk, Delhi in 1912. Rash Bihari Bose, Lokram Sharma and his brother Vishnu Sharma had been in the same house in Delhi on that bomb-throw day. Dr. Choithram arranged money for Rash Bihari Bose and sent him to Amritsar on way to Japan via Afghanistan”.

Note: Although it is said that Rash Behari Bose had ‘thrown” the bomb, it seems that he had ‘master-minded’ the event and was present nearby to direct the bomb-throw. On December 23, 1912, Lord Harding, the Viceroy of India, was to make his entry into Delhi in a procession. At 11.45am the procession reached Dhulya Katra in Chandni Chowk. A bomb ripped through the procession. The Viceroy escaped, but the man to his right in his howdah was killed and 20 spectators were injured. In the ensuing man-hunt Master Amir Chand, Avadh Behari and Bal Mukund were arrested and hanged in Delhi jail.. Basanta Viswas, who threw the bomb, disguised as a lady, was hanged in Ambala jail. Rash Behari Bose averted arrest owing to a clever disguise. The event, as observed by Sir Valentine Chirol, had a “tremendous effect on the subsequent revolutionary activities” . Rash Behari Bose remained on the move from Punjab to Uttar Pradesh to Bengal in different disguises. A police

officer noted that Rash Behari Bose could have been a “great stage actor” instead of a revolutionary if he so desired.

Rash Behari Bose’s escape from Sindh arranged by Dr. Choithram had also a touch of drama. Rash Behari wore a long beard with a wig of flowing white hair and carrying a long seven-foot pole covered with multi-colorful cloth and a large number of bells attached, he marched on, with banging the pole and repeating loud cries of ‘Alakh Niranjan’, ‘Anal Haq’, ‘Ya Ali, Ya Hussain’ and such religious slogans as though seeking to draw attention to himself but the result actually was that everyone kept away from him, regarding him as a demented sadhu or dervish (holy man), Not only in Sindh but elsewhere too he kept up the same charade, believing firmly that the surest way to avoid detection is to be loud in inviting attention to yourself.

As it is, an organizational set-up had already been created in Sindh to help revolutionaries in hiding and in assisting them to escape. Here again, we turn to page 89 of The Sindh Story by K.R.Malkani, which tells us:

Commissioner of Police

“In 1910, Acharya Kripalani, Kaka Kalelkar, Swami Govindanand, Dr. Choithram and others set up the Brahmacharya Ashram in Hyrerabad (Sindh)… This was not only an institution to produce patriotic young men – though song, drama and gymnastics but also a forum for other activities, including shelter for revolutionaries- in hiding.

“Dr. Choithram, Swami Alaram, Pandit Deendayal Vachaspati and Swami Satya Dev went on cow protection tour of Sindh singing, ‘Behl sahib khe karyo salam’ (‘Salute Sir Bullock’) and collected 3,000 rupees for the Brahmacharya Ashram.”

The Brahmachaya Ashram had nominated a number of members and well-wishers in all districts and many towns of Sindh. Amongst them was Dr. Vatanmal Gidwani of Mirpur Khas, Prof. Ghanshyam Shivdasani in Hyderabad and many others.

The Sindh Story by K.R.Malkani also tells us of how Baba Gurdit Singh, carrying a reward on his head ‘for his arrest dead or alive’ of 40,000 Rupees due to his part in hiring the Japanese ship komagatamaru was sheltered safely in Sindh for a period of three years – thanks to assistance from the Brahmacharya Ashram.

An interesting footnote should also be added here. Dr. Choithram Gidwani had given Rupees 845/ to Rash Bihari Bose, along with a gold bangle donated by Dr. Choithram’s elder brother’s wife, to facilitate his escape to Japan. Long after, when Rash Bihari Bose had reached Japan to settle down there, became a Japanese citizen after marrying a beautiful Japanese girl from the respected Soma family, Dr Choithram received a message through an intermediary, along with Rupees 845/ and the message simply said,

“My wife Tosiko’s parents have given me a gift; call it dowry if you will but it is a gift of love. So I must return Rupees 845/ for they belong to the Brahmacharya and the Cow – and the Cow must not be deprived on my account. As to the lady who donated the Bangle to me, I touch her feet. The bangle adorned my wife’s jewelry box for a while which now, in its entirety, she has donated to the Cause dear to you and us all. Let the Bangle then serve the Cause; and let us pray for the Cause and if time permits, even for us. . . . ”.

NOTE: Apart from the message to Dr. Choithram, Rash Behari Bose simultaneously also sent a message of Regards to Sister “Kumari Jethi”. To her were thanks for the 7-foot curtain rod stripped from the curtains in her drawing room, covered with her two colorful saris which served as his walking pole and the ghungroos and bells, she attached to the pole. Possibly the reference to “Kumari Jethi” is to Kumari Jethi Sipahimalani who later became a Member of the Sindh Legislative Assembly and was herself a freedom fighter, crusading for the rights of Sindhis in India after the Partition. But there is no clear confirmation yet to identify this reference to “Kumari Jethi”.

Rash Behari Bose gained prominence in Japan, particularly during World War II. With the help of Captain Mohan Singh and Sardar Pritam Singh, he formed the Indian National Army (I.N.A.) on September 1, 1942. Rash Behari was elected President and later gave Supreme Command of the I.N.A. to Subash Chandra Bose in 1943. Rash Behari expired before the end of World War II, on January 21, 1945.

Sindhi Code-Names:

There was considerable sympathy and support among the people of Sindh for the Gadar Movement. Those connected with the movement through efforts of, and contact with, Rash Bihari Bose, however, were very cautious and circumspect. For instance, Vishnu Sharma was code-named “Teesra Ishwar” (“third God” – a reference possibly to the third god in the Trinity of Gods – Brahma, Shiva and Vishnu). His brother, Lokram Sharma, who also, along with him, was in the same house in Delhi with Rash Bihari Bose on the day of bomb-throw at Lord Hardinge, had the code-name of “Teesra Ishwar ka Bhai” (“Brother of Third God”). Dr. Choithram Gidwani had the code-name of “Brahmadassa” which may possibly have been selected at random, unconnected with any particular association. (Brahmadassa is an uncommon Sindhi name. It was the name of the discoverer of the confluence of Sindhu and Saraswati Rivers. Brahmadassa started life in an Ashram as a Brahmachari but later renounced his

vow of Brahmacharya and married Rishi Vaswana’s daughter, settling along the Saraswati River. Thus the code name of Brahmadassa had no real connection with Dr.Choithram Gidwani’s life as he, throughout, intended to remain- and did remain – a Brahamachari) .

There was lasting advantage in the secrecy maintained by Sindhis in their code-names. When a person – who was very high up in the Gadar movement – turned a traitor and a police-informer, Gadar movement was broken up as all the names of the participants were with the Police. Sindhis with their code-names were protected as, despite a nation-wide investigation and hunt, their identities remained hidden. At least a dozen men with names of Ishwar Das, Ishwar Singh and such like, along with their brothers, were questioned by the Police, from time to time, on the suspicion that they may be the culprits referred to as, “Teesra Ishwar” or “Teesra Ishwar ka Bhai”

As many as 145 Gadarites were hanged by Indian Government, 308 were sentenced for longer than 14 years and many more for lesser terms. Some of them passed years in KALA PANI (Black waters) in the Andamans.

Fourteen Gadarites remained hidden in Sindh for long, sheltered through aid from the Brahmacharya Ashram. They moved out to safety, with changed identities and in disguise with somewhat altered appearance, when the police- hunt for them was no longer hot.

Dr. Choithram as also most Sindhis had by now had begun to embrace the Gandhian doctrine of non-violence as the way to make the British leave India. They no longer subscribed to the Gadarite philosophy of force and violence to gain independence. But even so, they felt honour bound to protect the Gadarites from police-hunt. “We have promises to keep”, they said, and they kept their promise. They also said among themselves, “If Gandhiji knew, he would understand”, but they left Gandhiji uninformed.

Support of SindhWorkis:

Sindhi traders (SindhWorkis) began to support the Gadar Movement. Certainly, the SindWorkis were not in the frontline of the movement. Their support largely consisted of financial donations – often substantial – to the movement. In one case, the firms of Pohoomal Bros, D.Chelaram, M.Dialdas & J.T.Chanrai of Hong Kong contributed on a large scale to a fund for the purchase of ammunition for an armed rising by Gadarites. Quite apart from this ad hoc assistance, SindhWorkis were paying regularly to the Gadarite treasury. The SindhWorki support also extended, in many cases, to providing safe-houses to hide the Gadar revolutionaries. Moreover, SindhWorkis were able to help Gadarites in passing their important and confidential messages as they had a vast and intricate network covering practically every country with associates, correspondents and in many cases, even branch offices.

Again, as The Sindh Story by K.R.Malkani points out, “When Subhash Chandra Bose set up INA in the Far East, his best and biggest supporters were the Sindhi businessmen there. Both Subhas Bose and Gandhiji referred to Sindhis as “World Citizens” since they are to be found everywhere.”

Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose is immortalized in our History for having formed the Azad Hind Government in exile, and regrouping and leading the Indian National Army to battle against the allies in Imphal and Burma during the World War II.

Sindhi families abroad donated large sums of money, ornaments, jewelry to support the Independence movement of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose.

Among the Sindhworkis who distinguished themselves by supporting these freedom movements are:

1) Wassiamull Assumall 2) J. Kimatrai3) Utoomal Assudomal 4) Gangaram, Singapore

5) Jhamandas Melwani, Hongkong/Singapore 6) Sehwani family (Manila) 7) K a J Chotirmall, Hongkong/Singapore8 ) Kewalram Corpoartion, Japan 9) Gulraj Corpoartion, Japan 10) P Parsram, Japan 11) Watumull’s Hawaii 12) Watanmal Bulchand 13) Chanrais 14) D Chellaram 15) G. Assanmall 16) Jhangimull and many others.

via – Dial V. Gidwani- Sindhu American

April 03, 2008

Khaksar Tehrik

In Memory of the Khaksar Martyrs of March 19, 1940

Researcher & Author

By Nasim Yousaf

On March 19, 1940, the Khaksar Tehrik (Movement) was banned by the Government of Punjab in British India , and Allama Mashriqi, his sons, and a very large number of Khaksars were imprisoned. In 1941, the Movement was banned on an all-India basis. Investigative research reveals that the ban on the Khaksar Tehrik and Mashriqi’s imprisonment were the result of mutual interest of the anti-Khaksar elements, including the British and the All-India Muslim League (AIML).

Both saw Mashriqi and his Movement as a threat and sought to secure themselves. The following briefly sheds light on British and AIML motivations and the subsequent banning of the Khaksar Movement.

Article available on the below mentioned Url:

http://www.allamamashraqi.com/grandsonsarticles.html

April 01, 2008

Sindhu Putra, Spiritual Leader of Sindhu Civilization in 5000 BC

By: Gul Karamchand

It was with utmost interest that I read Theme no. 9 at about Sindhu Putra, the Spiritual Leader of Sindh and the subcontinent in 5,000 BCE.

It is a marvelous account, with dramatic highlights, and touches the heart. Certainly it is worth reading, circulating. and reprinting.

The brutal assassination of Sindhu Putra in 5,000 BC brings home to us with sadness that the sacred soil of Sindh has, from time immemorial, suffered from brutality, violence, murder as also executions under false legal cover and assai nation of the best and brightest by hired guns.

To see this theme 9, please open http://www.sindhulogy.org and a click of the top heading of ‘Projects’, will list the themes from Return of the Aryans – and among those is Theme 9 about Sindhu Putra.

Bombay Presidency, Sindh & Sindhis

USA, TX: The president of the Sindhi Association of North America, Aziz Narejo has been invited to speak at an international seminar at the University of Mumbai. The seminar is being organized by the Department of Sindhi, University of Mumbai, at the Vidyanagari Campus on 11th March on ‘Bombay Presidency, Sindh & Sindhis’. Mr. Narejo is invited to present a paper on ‘Bombay Presidency, Sindh & Sindhis, Political Implications’.

March 07, 2008

International Sindhi seminar was great success

NEW DELHI, INDIA: A three-day international Sindhi seminar held at New Delhi (India) from Oct 26 to 28, 2007 which was a great success…

The seminar organized by an NGO Maruee in collaboration with Sindhi Academy, Delhi was attended, among others, by a 12-member writers’ delegation from Sindh (Pakistan) headed by Dr Suleman Shaikh – associated with Sindh Graduate Association – SGA. This was the 5th seminar of its kind which was held in connection with the silver jubilee celebrations of Maruee and it was dedicated to the great Sindhi Sufi poet Hazrat Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai (1689 – 1752). Various Sindhi speaking people who were followers of Shah Latif and living in various parts of India specially came to Delhi to attend the seminar.

A musical show was also organized on the occasion in which renowned singers from Sindh Shafi Faqir, Ms Paroo Chawla and Ms Padma Gidwani (both from India) performed. An Indo-Pak poetic symposium dedicated to the two renowned Sindhi poets late Naryan Shyam and late Shaikh Ayaz held. Sant Kanwar Awards were also distributed on the occasion. Ms Veena Shringi, General Secretary of Maruee and Ms Shalini Sagar – Information Secretary made special efforts to make this seminar a great success.

The members of Sindh’s delegation were; Dr Suleman Shaikh (leader), Abdul Fatah Malik Advocate, Mohammad Khan Sial, Noor Ahmed Jhinjhi, Ali Haider Shaikh, Ms Najma Shaikh, Shafi Faqir (singer), Ms Mehrunissa larik, Ms Nusrat Lashari, Ms Nazir Naaz, Ms Mumtaz Fatah Malik & Ms Nahid Hingoro. The Group members visited various historical, religious & entertainment places in Delhi like Jamia Masjid, Red Fort, Gate of India, Mazars of Sarmad Shaheed & Abul Kalaam Azad, Mazar of Nizamuddin Olyae, Qutab Minar and most modern under-ground train system (metro train) which is still under construction but partially is in operation.

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If two Germanys re-unite, why not Pakistan, India? Pro-govt. ex- parliamentarian Syed Khadim Ali Shah demands in Delhi seminar

NEW DELHI, INDIA: A pro-Govt ex-parliamentarian (Pakistan) Syed Khadim Ali Shah who belongs to Mirpurkhas district in Sindh has suggested that if two Berlins (Germanys) reunite, why not Pakistan and India? He was speaking in an inaugural session of Sindhi seminar held on Oct 26, 2007 at Delhi which was dedicated to the Great Sindhi Sufi poet Hazrat Shah Abdul Lateef Bhittai. Mr Shah attended the seminar in connection with launching ceremony of 04 books including his book written on Shaheed Bakhtaawar – a Sindhi lady who laid her life for raising voice against unjustified distribution of grain between peasants and landlords in Thar. It may be pointed out this was a literary and non-political seminar which held from Oct 26 to 28 in Delhi to celebrate silver jubilee celebrations of Maruee – an NGO in collaboration with Sindhi Academy, Delhi (Sindh). Later organizers of the seminar, informally expressed their embarrassment on such political demand in a literary programme dedicated to the Sufi poet Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai (Sindh)

Source: SindhWeek.com

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International Sindhi Conference in Singapore – An important effort to keep Sindhis Connected

By Dr. Satish Rohra

Under the auspices of Alliance of Sindhi Associations America and Singapore Sindhi Association, a memorable Sammelan/Conference held at Singapore from 27th to 29th July 2007.

This conference was International in real sense. In former Sindhi conferences most of the time only a few delegates from neighboring country attend. But this Sammelan was attended by delegates from 35 countries including USA, U.K, India and Singapore around the world. …

It is necessary to mention here that beginning of these Sammelans was made by Sindhis of America. In beginning for many years this Sammelan was held in USA or Canada. The very first Sammelan was held at New Jersey near New York. New one was in New York. Later they were held at Chicago, Toronto (Canada), San Francisco, Los Angeles, Orlando, Las Vegas, etc. Three years ago it was held at London. Last year it was held at Mumbai.

… This was the first Sammelan, which was inaugurated by the head of the State. On the 27th July at 7pm, at Hotel Grand Copthorne, President of the Republic of Singapore, his Excellency Shri S. R. Nathan personally lit the lamp and declared the conference open. Mr. Presidnet Nathan had come together with Lady Nathan and some of his cabinet ministers and other officials. …

It was also the first time that India’s former deputy Prime Minister and Opposition leader in the present parliament of Indis, Shri Lal Krishin Advani graced the Sammelan with his presence…

President of Singapore, Mr. Nathan who inaugurated the Sammelan or conference praised Sindhi’s role in the development of Singapore. … The key note speaker, Professor Kishore Mahbubani, Dean of the Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at National University of Singapore and former ambassador of Singapore to the United Nations, said, so far Sindhis have been engrossed in “difficulties”, “achievements”, and “trade”; now they should pay attention to other three and they are “Globalization”, “Peace” and “Tolerance”.

High commissioner for India in Singapore, Dr. Jaishankar, welcomed all delegates and expressed his pleasure that this Sammelan was organized in Singapore.

Dr. Satish Rohra said that the Sammelans and conferences of this kind are very necessary in which we talk and strengthen ourselves as Sindhis. Dr. Rohra further said, “Sindhiat” is not a name of anything… Dr. Satish emphasized that there are many virtues in Sindhi Sanskriti which could bring about a “better world”. He further said, it is wrong to believe that Sindhis have no unity; in fact Sindhis are quite well united… Dr. Rohra also pointed out that for Sindhis “to stay connected to each other” is enough, and that itself is the unity.

Ram Jawhrani said that although majority of Sindhis are financially well off … Kimat Israni talked of ten points on nourishing Sindhi Bhasha…

… Swami Swaroopanatida’s discourse on one way praised Sindhis but at the same time he talked the lack of unity in Sindhis. Swamiji’s talk was very powerful.

Dr. Ram Buxani had plenty to say. His main topic was “Talk Sindhi”, Live Sindhi” and keep “Sindhyat” alive.

In the concluding speech, Kamlesh Moorjani told in his loud and effective voice the achievements of this Sammelan and congratulated the organizers. ….

Source: Sindhishaan

///-///-///

19/11/2007

NEW DELHI, INDIA: A three-day international Sindhi seminar held at New Delhi (India) from Oct 26 to 28, 2007 which was a great success…

The seminar organized by an NGO Maruee in collaboration with Sindhi Academy, Delhi was attended, among others, by a 12-member writers’ delegation from Sindh (Pakistan) headed by Dr Suleman Shaikh – associated with Sindh Graduate Association – SGA. This was the 5th seminar of its kind which was held in connection with the silver jubilee celebrations of Maruee and it was dedicated to the great Sindhi Sufi poet Hazrat Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai (1689 – 1752). Various Sindhi speaking people who were followers of Shah Latif and living in various parts of India specially came to Delhi to attend the seminar.

A musical show was also organized on the occasion in which renowned singers from Sindh Shafi Faqir, Ms Paroo Chawla and Ms Padma Gidwani (both from India) performed. An Indo-Pak poetic symposium dedicated to the two renowned Sindhi poets late Naryan Shyam and late Shaikh Ayaz held. Sant Kanwar Awards were also distributed on the occasion. Ms Veena Shringi, General Secretary of Maruee and Ms Shalini Sagar – Information Secretary made special efforts to make this seminar a great success.

The members of Sindh’s delegation were; Dr Suleman Shaikh (leader), Abdul Fatah Malik Advocate, Mohammad Khan Sial, Noor Ahmed Jhinjhi, Ali Haider Shaikh, Ms Najma Shaikh, Shafi Faqir (singer), Ms Mehrunissa larik, Ms Nusrat Lashari, Ms Nazir Naaz, Ms Mumtaz Fatah Malik & Ms Nahid Hingoro. The Group members visited various historical, religious & entertainment places in Delhi like Jamia Masjid, Red Fort, Gate of India, Mazars of Sarmad Shaheed & Abul Kalaam Azad, Mazar of Nizamuddin Olyae, Qutab Minar and most modern under-ground train system (metro train) which is still under construction but partially is in operation.

*-*-*-*

If two Germanys re-unite, why not Pakistan, India? Pro-govt. ex- parliamentarian Syed Khadim Ali Shah demands in Delhi seminar

Courtesy: SindhWeek.com

NEW DELHI, INDIA: [By: Special Correspondent – Sindh Week.Com Report] A pro-Govt ex-parliamentarian (Pakistan) Syed Khadim Ali Shah who belongs to Mirpurkhas district in Sindh has suggested that if two Berlins (Germanys) reunite, why not Pakistan and India? He was speaking in an inaugural session of Sindhi seminar held on Oct 26, 2007 at Delhi which was dedicated to the Great Sindhi Sufi poet Hazrat Shah Abdul Lateef Bhittai. Mr Shah attended the seminar in connection with launching ceremony of 04 books including his book written on Shaheed Bakhtaawar – a Sindhi lady who laid her life for raising voice against unjustified distribution of grain between peasants and landlords in Thar. It may be pointed out this was a literary and non-political seminar which held from Oct 26 to 28 in Delhi to celebrate silver jubilee celebrations of Maruee – an NGO in collaboration with Sindhi Academy, Delhi (Sindh). Later organizers of the seminar, informally expressed their embarrassment on such political demand in a literary programme dedicated to the Sufi poet Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai (Sindh)

Courtesy: SindhWeek.com

*-*-*-*

International Sindhi Conference in Singapore

An important effort to keep Sindhis Connected

By Dr. Satish Rohra

Courtesy: Sindhishaan

Under the auspices of Alliance of Sindhi Associations America and Singapore Sindhi Association, a memorable Sammelan/Conference held at Singapore from 27th to 29th July 2007.

This conference was International in real sense. In former Sindhi conferences most of the time only a few delegates from neighboring country attend. But this Sammelan was attended by delegates from 35 countries including USA, U.K, India and Singapore around the world. …

It is necessary to mention here that beginning of these Sammelans was made by Sindhis of America. In beginning for many years this Sammelan was held in USA or Canada. The very first Sammelan was held at New Jersey near New York. New one was in New York. Later they were held at Chicago, Toronto (Canada), San Francisco, Los Angeles, Orlando, Las Vegas, etc. Three years ago it was held at London. Last year it was held at Mumbai.

… This was the first Sammelan, which was inaugurated by the head of the State. On the 27th July at 7pm, at Hotel Grand Copthorne, President of the Republic of Singapore, his Excellency Shri S. R. Nathan personally lit the lamp and declared the conference open. Mr. Presidnet Nathan had come together with Lady Nathan and some of his cabinet ministers and other officials. …

It was also the first time that India’s former deputy Prime Minister and Opposition leader in the present parliament of Indis, Shri Lal Krishin Advani graced the Sammelan with his presence…

President of Singapore, Mr. Nathan who inaugurated the Sammelan or conference praised Sindhi’s role in the development of Singapore. … The key note speaker, Professor Kishore Mahbubani, Dean of the Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at National University of Singapore and former ambassador of Singapore to the United Nations, said, so far Sindhis have been engrossed in “difficulties”, “achievements”, and “trade”; now they should pay attention to other three and they are “Globalization”, “Peace” and “Tolerance”.

High commissioner for India in Singapore, Dr. Jaishankar, welcomed all delegates and expressed his pleasure that this Sammelan was organized in Singapore.

Dr. Satish Rohra said that the Sammelans and conferences of this kind are very necessary in which we talk and strengthen ourselves as Sindhis. Dr. Rohra further said, “Sindhiat” is not a name of anything… Dr. Satish emphasized that there are many virtues in Sindhi Sanskriti which could bring about a “better world”. He further said, it is wrong to believe that Sindhis have no unity; in fact Sindhis are quite well united… Dr. Rohra also pointed out that for Sindhis “to stay connected to each other” is enough, and that itself is the unity.

Ram Jawhrani said that although majority of Sindhis are financially well off … Kimat Israni talked of ten points on nourishing Sindhi Bhasha…

… Swami Swaroopanatida’s discourse on one way praised Sindhis but at the same time he talked the lack of unity in Sindhis. Swamiji’s talk was very powerful.

Dr. Ram Buxani had plenty to say. His main topic was “Talk Sindhi”, Live Sindhi” and keep “Sindhyat” alive.

In the concluding speech, Kamlesh Moorjani told in his loud and effective voice the achievements of this Sammelan and congratulated the organizers. ….