Tag Archives: Quebec

Parti Québécois Leader Pauline Marois says sovereign Quebec would keep the loonie

Marois reiterates the separatist party’s long-held position that Quebec would keep using the Canadian currency — and seek a seat on the Bank of Canada.

By: The Canadian Press

QUEBEC—An independent Quebec would keep using the Canadian dollar and ask for a seat at the Bank of Canada, Parti Québécois Leader Pauline Marois said Wednesday.

Marois told reporters at a campaign stop that Canada would benefit from having a sovereign Quebec maintain its ties to the loonie and the central bank.

Read more » Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2014/03/12/parti_qubcois_leader_pauline_marois_says_sovereign_quebec_would_keep_the_loonie.html

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International Politics: What are likely to be the next new countries, or at least the most likely candidates to become independent?

By Thomas Foster, writer at ThePulp.co

Excerpt;

Quebec

Quebec has had a fairly long independence movement but referendums in 1980 and 1995 have been voted down. Parti Québécois recently won government again but as they are in minority government, have said that they will not hold an independence referendum this term of government.

The numbers of those in support of independence have gone from just under 40% in the 1980 referendum to 49.43% in favour in 1995. However, the Canadian government would now require a majority of eligible voters, not a plurality of votes, for Quebec or another province to secede.

Read more » Quora
http://www.quora.com/International-Politics/What-are-likely-to-be-the-next-new-countries-or-at-least-the-most-likely-candidates-to-become-independent/answer/Thomas-Foster?srid=tdkM&share=1

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RCMP arrest two in alleged plot to derail VIA Rail train

Canadian security officials say they have thwarted a terrorism plot and arrested two suspects in Ontario and Quebec.

By: National Security Reporter, News reporter

Two terrorism suspects charged with plotting to derail a VIA passenger train travelling between Toronto and New York, in what police are calling a “Al Qaeda-sponsored” attack with alleged ties to Iran, will appear in court Tuesday morning.

Raed Jaser, 35, of Toronto, and 30-year-old Chiheb Esseghaier, from Montreal, both face five charges including a conspiring with a terrorist group, although the RCMP said the public did not face “imminent” danger.

The Tunisian-born Esseghaier is an engineer with a master’s degree in industrial biotechnology from Tunis, according to an online blog that was deleted shortly after his arrest was announced. He studied at Quebec’s Université de Sherbrooke from 2008-2009 and is currently listed as a doctoral student at the Institute National de la Recherche Scientifique, near Montreal.

RCMP officers flew Esseghaier to Toronto Monday, escorting him off a small aircraft at Buttonville Municipal Airport in handcuffs and shackles 10 minutes before his arrest was announced publicly.

Jaser, according to sources, is of Palestinian descent and lived in the United Arab Emirates before moving here. Neighbours confirmed he lived in a rented North York apartment but were unaware of his profession.

Continue reading RCMP arrest two in alleged plot to derail VIA Rail train

CBC News – Canada loses 54,500 jobs in March

Jobless rate ticks higher to 7.2% as private-sector hiring slumps

By CBC News

Canada’s economy lost 54,500 jobs in March, bleak new data from Statistics Canada showed Friday.

That’s the worst month for Canadian employment since the recession of 2009. When added to the numbers for January and February, they show that Canada’s economy has lost 26,000 jobs so far in 2013 as a whole

The job losses pushed Canada’s jobless rate higher to 7.2 per cent.

“Official unemployment would have increased even more but for 12,300 Canadians dropping out of the labour force altogether and consequently not being counted as unemployed,” United Steelworkers economist Erin Weir said of the data.

Provincially, Quebec, British Columbia and Alberta lost jobs, and employment edged down in Ontario. The only province with an increase was Nova Scotia.

Loonie sinks on news

Private sector hiring, the engine of growth that policymakers keep a close eye on, actually fared even worse. There were 85,000 fewer private sector workers in March, while the public sector was largely unchanged,

There was an increase of 39,000 among self-employed people that counteracted the decline.

Overall, economists had been expecting about 6,500 new jobs, so a loss of 54,500 represents a considerable miss.

Much of the losses came among those in the core working-age group of those between 25 and 54. Among those younger than 25 and older than 54, the job numbers were pretty steady.

The Canadian dollar lost half a cent to trade below 98 cents US in reaction to the news.

Courtesy: CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2013/04/05/business-jobs-canada.html

CPPC on Quebec Students Movement – We stand in solidarity with the students in Québec!

The Québec Student Strike – Why we support it and why we condemn Bill 78

The Committee of Progressive Pakistani Canadians (CPPC) believes the right to an education is one all citizens of the world must have access to. Moreover, that access should be without financial cost. Only by having an educated population can a country truly be free.

Continue reading CPPC on Quebec Students Movement – We stand in solidarity with the students in Québec!

Wonderful article by Haider Nizamani – States do let go of territories

In an op-ed titled “Be strong, not hard”, published in these pages on February 21, Ejaz Haider problematises conflict in Balochistan and offers suggestions to Islamabad on how to tackle the crisis in the troubled province. The premise of his argument is on the assumption that all states are alike when it comes to dealing with people wanting to secede from them. He puts it unequivocally in following words: “Balochistan is indeed Pakistan’s internal issue. Those who want Balochistan to secede from Pakistan will get the state’s full reply. That too, given how states behave, is a foregone conclusion. Hell, states don’t even let go of disputed territories and care even less about whether or not people in those territories want to live with them.”

Historical and empirical evidence of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, fortunately, does not validate Ejaz Haider’s claim. States do care if people living in their jurisdictions want to stay under existing arrangements or not. Contrary to Ejaz Haider’s claim, states do let go of people and territories through peaceful means.

I will cite three cases where the states in question have behaved peacefully while dealing with political actors who have championed the cause of independence from them. My argument, therefore, is that not all states are alike and the outcomes of independence movements vary significantly.

Let us look at the former Czechoslovakia, a state where leaders peacefully decided in 1992 to split into two countries — Czech Republic and Slovakia. In 1989, Vaclav Havel’s Civic Forum led the peaceful movement against the communist regime. This movement because of its ability to affect political change through nonviolent means got the title of the Velvet Revolution. Viladimir Meciar’s Movement for a Democratic Slovakia emerged as a leading party in Slovakia demanding greater autonomy for the region. Unable to get along in a federation, the Czech and Slovak leaders passed the law on December 27, 1992 to go their separate ways. Three years into the Velvet Revolution, Czech and Slovakia opted for the velvet divorce.

The Quebec sovereignty movement in Canada is another case where the central government has chosen to deal with the demand for sovereignty through peaceful means. The Parti Quebecois (PQ), pro-sovereignty party in Canada’s second most populous province, was in power in the 1990s. The PQ held a referendum in the province in 1995 asking people if they would like to form an independent country. The PQ lost the referendum by a razor-thin margin of less than one per cent. The Canadian government, at no point, had indicated or implied the use of force to suppress the Quebec separatists.

Continue reading Wonderful article by Haider Nizamani – States do let go of territories

We should learn the lesson from the Quebecers

by Khalid Hashmani, McLean, Virginia

A new Sindhi political party “AWAMI JAMHOORI PARTY (AJP)” was formally launched in Hyderabad, Sindh, Pakistan today. Although some of its leaders had been previously associated with other political parties (mainly Awami Tehreek headed by Rasool Bux Palejo), the leaders of the new party say that AJP will be quite different from other Sindhi parties as it will attract a large following of Sindhi middle class. Whether or not the new party wins that mandate of the Sindhi middle class is yet to be seen, in my view, the notion of “more the merrier” does not apply to political parties.

Continue reading We should learn the lesson from the Quebecers

Advice for JSQM

by Manzoor Chandio, Karachi, Sindh

I’m writing this with reference to many postings on these lists and some JSQM men’s talk with me…JSQM leaders are angry on English and Urdu media’s coverage of their rally in Karachi. Some Awami Tehrik activists are also worried about the press coverage of their long march reaching Karachi soon.

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If Quebecers can get success in Canada then why can’t Sindhis get success for their rights

Khalid Hashmani
Khalid Hashmani

By Khalid Hashmani, USA

The first steps that Quebecers took to preserve their language and culture. Before the famous Signs language law was proposed by Parti Québécois and enacted by the Quebec National Assembly in 1977, Quebecers urged/pressured business and non-governmental organizations to increase the use of French in their signs and organizational literature.

After achieving a measurable success with their own organizations, Quebecers eventually succeeded in electing a government that gave legal protection to their language. In spite of great pressures of over whelming domination of English-speaking North Americans (Quebecers are only 6.3 millions in a population of about 350 millions) , they have succeeded in preserving their language and culture.

Quebec’s sovereigntist’s short history

1960> The Quiet Revolution in Quebec Spawns a series of independence- minded movements and parties. 1970> The Parti Quebecois, under Rene Levesque, wins its first seats in Quebec’s National Assembly. 1976> The PQ wins a majority of seats and forms the provincial government for the first time. 1980> The PQ holds a referendum on sovereignty association.. 1982> Canada repatriates the Constitution, collapses Lucien Bouchard quits the federal cabinet and founds the Bloc Quebecois. 1992> The Charlttetown Accord, another attempt to reform the Constitution, is jejected in a countrywide referendum. 1993> The Bloc Quebecois wins enough seats nationally to be the offical opposition in the House of Commons. 1995> A second referendom is held on sovereighty. It is narrowly defeated by 50.6% to 49.4% (one vote). 1999> The federal government passes the Clarity Act setting out terms under which it will recognize a province’s right to leave the federation.

Continue reading Quebec’s sovereigntist’s short history