Tag Archives: Pakistan crisis

Pakistan could collapse in six months: Kilcullen

pakistan-federal-assemblyCourtesy and Thanks: The News,

Tuesday, March 24, 2009
Centcom adviser warns Pakistan in danger; says Pak security services a rogue state within a state
News Desk
WASHINGTON: The Pakistani state could collapse within six months if immediate steps are not taken to remedy the situation, warned a top adviser to the US Central Command.
David Kilcullen, who advises CENTCOM commander Gen. David H. Petraeus on the war on terror, urged US policymakers to focus their attention on Pakistan as a failure there could have devastating consequences for the entire international community.
In an interview with The Washington Post (Sunday Edition), Kilcullen, who is credited with the success of the US troop surge strategy in Iraq, warned that if Pakistan went out of control, it would ‘dwarf’ all the crises in the world today. “Pakistan hands down. No doubt,” he said when asked to name the central front in the war against terror.

Asked to explain why he thought Pakistan was so important, Kilcullen said: “Pakistan has 173 million people, 100 nuclear weapons, an army bigger than the US Army, and al-Qaeda headquarters sitting right there in the two-thirds of the country that the government doesnít control.”

He claimed that the Pakistani military and police and intelligence service did not follow the civilian government; they were essentially a rogue state within a state. “Were now reaching the point where within one to six months we could see the collapse of the Pakistani state, also because of the global financial crisis, which just exacerbates all these problems,” he said. “The collapse of Pakistan, al-Qaeda acquiring nuclear weapons, an extremist takeover – that would dwarf everything we’ve seen in the war on terror today.”

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Pakistan in turmoil as court bans ex-PM

Sharif’s backers protest in streets after ruling bars him from office

by Laura King, Los Angeles Times

Islamabad- Former prime minister Nawaz Sharif may well be the most popular politician in Pakistan. So the Supreme Court’s decision yesterday that bans him from holding elected office has set the stage for what could be a bitter show-down between his backers and the already shaky government of President Asif Ali Zardari.

Pakistan, which over the past 18 months has seen a grassroot uprising against long-time military leader [Dictator] Pervez Musharraf, the assassination of former prime minister Benazir Bhutto and then the advent of civilian rule, appears ill-prepared for another prolonged period of political. turmoil. Islamic insurgents are gaining strength, and the economy is virtually on life support from international leaders.

Analysts characterized yesterday’s court ruling as a drawing of battle lines between Zardari’s Pakistan Peoples party and its one time ally, Sharif’s Pakistan Muslim league- N. Two parties teamed in Feb 2008 to take on Musharraf, soundly defeating his party in parliamentary elections and ousting him from office six months latter. But having gained power, they fell out with on another.

Sharif’s supporters protested yesterday’s verdict, saying they do not recognize the legitimacy of the court. They repeated demands for the reinstatement of the former chief justice and other senior judges dismissed by Musharraf in late 2007 during a bout of de facto martial law.

“This is mockery of justice, mockery of democracy,” Ahsan Iqbal, senior leader of Sharif’s party, said of the ruling. “The decision has once again pushed Pakistan on the path of political confrontation and political instability.”

The former prime minister’s brother, Shahbaz Sharif, was also disqualified by the court from holding office, in effect removing him from his position as chief minister of Punjab, the country’s most populous and affluent province.

Supporters of the Shairf pouredinto the streets of major cities, burning tires and chanting anti government slogans.

A firebrand populist, Sharif returned to Pakistan in late 2007 after nearly eight years in exile, foiling efforts by Musharraf to keep him away. Although Shairf’s party trailed the Pakistan People’s Party in the February 2008 vote, some commentators attributed that to sympathy over the assassination six weeks earlier of Bhutto, Zardari’s wife. Most public opinion polls suggested Sharif’s popularty has now eclipsed Zardari’s.

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Our source of above article Thursday, Feb 26, 2009, Toronto Star, page A13.

Nothing in the world that can override the will of mankind: Time to break this web

Iqbal Tareen, Herndon, USA
In USA high un-employment, crashing housing industry, rising consumer prices, dwindling financial markets and institutions, tight credit, and high cost of fuel has taken the toll on nation’s morale. We are going through toughest times of our own.
In Pakistan, although Musharraf is gone but eight years of his dark legacy has left the nation belly-up. At the time when Pakistan is in need of friends, the mounting internal and external pressures are drifting the nation of Pakistan toward a major showdown with global powers. A fragile democratic rule in Pakistan is already facing suicidal blows and threats of military takeovers.

Continue reading Nothing in the world that can override the will of mankind: Time to break this web