Tag Archives: Mingora

Long Live Malala Yousufzai, Long Live Pakhtoon resistance. Death to her attackers & to this terrorist mindset. Sindh salutes Malala.

Taliban says it shot ‘infidel’ Pakistani teen for advocating girls’ rights

By Haq Nawaz Khan, By Michele Langevine Leiby

PESHAWAR, Pakistan — A 14-year-old Pakistani activist who won international acclaim for speaking out for girls denied education under the Taliban was shot and seriously wounded Tuesday on her way home from school, authorities said.

The Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack on ninth-grader Malala Yousafzai, who officials said was shot in the head by at least one gunman who approached a school bus in Mingora, a city in the scenic Swat valley in the country’s northwest.

Yousafzai was flown by helicopter to a military hospital in Peshawar, where officials said a bullet was lodged near her spine. Surgeons were unable to operate immediately because of swelling in her skull. ….

Read more : The Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/taliban-says-it-shot-infidel-pakistani-teen-for-advocating-girls-rights/2012/10/09/29715632-1214-11e2-9a39-1f5a7f6fe945_story.html

Pakistan : ANP, MP killed in suicide attack

Suicide bomber kills ANP lawmaker – by Hameedullah Khan

Courtesy: Dawn, Tuesday, 01 Dec, 2009

MINGORA: A teenaged suicide bomber blew himself up, killing ANP lawmaker Shamsher Ali Khan as he was seeing off guests who had come to his house here to offer Eid greetings on Tuesday. Shamsher Khan’s two brothers and nine other people were injured. The man with explosives strapped to his body had walked unchallenged into the Hujra of the MPA’s house, witnesses said. Shamsher Khan died on the spot while his brothers Shaukat Ali Khan and Mohammad Ali Khan were injured.

Continue reading Pakistan : ANP, MP killed in suicide attack

Military seeking revenge against Taliban in Swat for heavy causalities, senior offical says

Pakistan army tied to killings

by Jane Perlez and Pir Zubair Shah, Islamabad

Courtesy: Toronto Star, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2009

Mingora – Two months after the Pakistani army wrested control of the Swat Valley from Taliban militants, a new campaign for fear has taken hold, with scores, perhaps hundreds, of bodies dumped on the streets in what human rights advocates and local residents say is the work of the military. In some, cases, people may simply have been seeking revenge against the ruthless Taliban, in a society that tends to accept tit-for-tat reprisals, local politicians said.

But the scale of the retaliation, the similarities in the way that many of the victims have been tortured and the systematic nature of the deaths and disappearances in areas that the military firmly controls have raised suspicions. Local residents, human rights workers and some Pakistani officials conclude the millitary has had a role in the campaign. The Pakistani army, which is supported by the United States and in the absence of effective political  leadership is running much of Swat with an iron hand, has strenuously denied any involvement with the killings. The army has acknowledged the bodies have turned up, but its spokesmen assert they are the result of civilians setting scores with collaborators. “There are no extrajudicial killings in our system,” said army spokesman Col. Akhtar Abbas. “If something happens, we have a foolproof accountability system.” Neighbours of the victims and Swat residents say there is something more going on than revenge killing by civilians. A senior politician from the region and a former interior minister, Aftab Ahmed Sherpao, said he was worried about the army’s involvement in the killings. “There have been reports of extrajudicial killings by the military that are of concern,” he said. “This will not help bring peace.” The operation in Swat, begun under public pressure from the United States, has been hailed by Washington as a showcase effort of the army’s newfound resolve to defeat the militants. The American ambassador, Anne patterson, visited Mingora, the biggest town in Swat, last week, becoming the first senior American official to go to Swat since the army took over. Now, concerns over the army’s methods in the area threaten to further taint Washington’s association with the military, cooperation that has been questioned in Congress and has been politically unpopular in Pakistan. The number of killings suggests the military is seeking to silence enthusiasm for the Taliban and to settle accounts for heavy army causalties, said a senior provincial official who declined to be identified for fear of reprimand by the army. – Source – Toronto Star, page – A12, Tuesday, Sep 15, 2009.

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To read more about Army Torture video at BBC Urdu, click here or click the following link of BBC

http://www.bbc.co.uk/urdu/pakistan/2009/10/091002_army_torture_video_zs.shtml

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Link to watch video of human rights abuses click here or click the following link;

http://pkpolitics.com/2009/10/01/human-rights-abuses-by-pakistan-army/

There is no Islam in Swat. The Taliban have finished it.

The Women of Swat and ‘Mullah Radio’

By a group of NWFP women

Courtesy: AIRRA.ORG

Islam started as soon as we fled from Malakand. People outside Swat think we had Islam and Shariat. There is no Islam in Swat. The Taliban have finished it.

woman from Mingawera, Swat, in a Sawabai camp

Where does one begin to tell you what they have been saying? It is difficult to explain because it is difficult for some of us to believe, to understand, and at times, even to empathise with. Between their rage and their tears, between giving each other solace and laughing at lighter moments, they opened up to talk to us. They shall not be named but they shall be heard by all of us today.

Continue reading There is no Islam in Swat. The Taliban have finished it.

Pakistani Taliban claim to be moving in

‘The day is not far when Islamabad will be in the hands of the mujahideen,’ Pakistani Taliban commander Mullah Nazeer Ahmed said.

MINGORA: Pakistani Taliban are moving into a new area in northern Pakistan, clashing with villagers and police in a mountain valley, police and district officials said on Wednesday.

Separately, a Pakistani Taliban commander said the Pakistani military and the United States were colluding in US drone aircraft attacks and the militants would take their war to the capital, Islamabad, in response.

Surging militant violence across Pakistan is reviving western concerns about the stability of its nuclear-armed ally.

Pakistan is crucial to US efforts to stabilise Afghanistan.

US envoy to Afghanistan and Pakistan Richard Holbrooke, and Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, were in Pakistan for talks on security strategy this week.

In a development that will deepen the west’s concerns, scores of Taliban have moved into Buner district, 100 km northwest of Islamabad, from the Swat valley where authorities struck a peace pact in February aimed at ending violence.

‘About 20 vehicles carrying Taliban entered Buner on Monday and started moving around the bazaar and streets,’ said senior police officer Israr Bacha.

Villagers formed a militia, known as a lashkar, to confront the Taliban and eight of the insurgents were killed in a clash on Tuesday, police said.

Two villagers and three policemen were also killed.

‘People don’t like the Taliban,’ Ghulam Mustafa, deputy chief of Buner, told Reuters by telephone.

Muslim Khan, a Taliban spokesman in Swat, was defiant. ‘What law stops us going there?’ Khan said. ‘Our people will go there and stay there as long as they want.’

Authorities agreed in February to impose Islamic law in Swat to end more than a year of fighting.

Critics said appeasement would only embolden the militants to take over other areas.

Pakistan’s western allies fear such pacts create safe havens for Taliban and al Qaeda fighters.

Pakistani Taliban commander Mullah Nazeer Ahmed said in an interview with al Qaeda’s media arm, Al-Sahab, that Pakistan was behind US drone attacks on militants.

Authorities were misleading the public by saying it was the United States carrying out the strikes, he said, and it was the Pakistani army that sent spies to facilitate them.

‘All these attacks that have happened and are still happening are the work of Pakistan,’ Ahmed said, according to a transcript of the interview posted on Al-Sahab’s website.

Alarmed by deteriorating security in Afghanistan, the United States has since last year stepped up drone strikes in Pakistan.

Pakistan objects to the strikes, calling them a violation of its sovereignty that complicates its effort to fight militancy.

Other Taliban commanders said recent violence in Pakistan has been in retaliation for the drone attacks and threatened more.

Ahmed said Pakistani Taliban factions had united and would take their war to the capital: ‘The day is not far when Islamabad will be in the hands of the mujahideen.’

Ahmed also blamed the Pakistani military’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) agency for sowing divisions between factions, saying the ISI was the Taliban’s main enemy.

Some US officials have said recently the ISI maintained contacts with militants and there were indications ISI elements even provided support to the Taliban or al Qaeda militants.

Such accusations have angered Pakistan, although a military spokesman denied reports that ISI chief Lieutenant-General Ahmed Shujaa Pasha had snubbed Holbrooke and Mullen by refusing to meet them on Tuesday.

Courtesy: DAWN

http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect/dawn-content-library/dawn/news/pakistan/pakistani-taliban-said-moving-closer-to-capital–qs

The winners & the loosers!

by Asim Kaghzi, Calgary

The girl flogging video clip is a part of documentary relayed on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) network in Canada, the same documentary also showed public punishment of a man as well, which is equally condemnable, the documentary also showed how the state has practically dissolved on ground in Swat area, the really shocking thing is the failure of State to prove totally ineffective in administration of law and order situation, it is very much true for Swat which is documented, also in Punjab when state was trying to control Noon League Munda from coming to Islamabad from Lahore, whereas state can shoot at site people in Sindh and Baluchistan.
So what does that mean, in my humble opinion, the state has started melting and is bifurcated between winners and losers. I see extremists as winners and Sindhis and Balochs as losers.

Courtesy: SANAlist, April 06, 2009