Tag Archives: Jamshoro

Another good work by USAID

us aidSteps for education: USAID-funded building to open in Sindh University

By: The Express Tribune Report

HYDERABAD: The ground breaking ceremony for a new education faculty building, being funded by the USAID, at the Sindh University, Hyderabad was held on Wednesday.

“The building is part of the $40 million project to establish 14 new faculties of education across Pakistan over the next two years,” informed the US consul-general, Michael Dodman, who was the chief guest at the ceremony. Two other education faculty buildings are being constructed at the University of Karachi and the Shah Abdul Latif University, he added.

The new faculty will accommodate two new teaching programmes including the two-year associate degree in education and the four-year Bachelors of education. “These courses have been designed in collaboration with the Higher Education Commission (HEC). The USAID is working with 110 universities and teacher training colleges in Pakistan to initiate these programmes.”

The new building, to be completed by June 2014 at the cost of Rs23 million, will have 18 classrooms, computer labs, a wi-fi system, a library, an auditorium and a media library. Its eco-friendly structure will be an additional feature.

The three-storey structure is being built over an area of 20,000 square feet, adjacent to the heritage building of the old campus. “We will offer classes in the morning and evening shifts in order to accommodate as many students as possible,” said the education faculty’s dean, Dr Parveen Munshi.

USAID mission director Grogory Gottlieb said that around 2,500 students and 200 teachers will acquire education from the 14 new faculties every year. Over the last four years, he added, the USAID has rehabilitated around 600 schools, sponsored 10,000 university scholarships and provided training to 12,000 teachers in Pakistan.

Courtesy: The Express Tribune, July 11th, 2013.
http://tribune.com.pk/story/575299/steps-for-education-usaid-funded-building-to-open-in-sindh-university/

Violence in Kotri, Jamshoro after JSMM activists killed

By

HYDERABAD: Two people were killed while four others received bullet injuries as violence broke out in Kotri, Jamshoro district on Sunday evening.

The incident comes in the backdrop of the killing of two activists of the banned Jeay Sindh Muttahida Mahaz (JSMM) in Khairpur Nathan Shah of Dadu district.

Their bullet riddled and mutilated bodies were found in Dadu earlier in the day. Two vehicles were torched and a train was attacked in the unfolding incidents of violence in Kotri.

JSMM has called for a province wide strike on Monday, according to a press release received through an email, to condemn the incident.

The PR blamed ISI and Rangers saying that they had picked up two activists who were busy in preparation of late GM Syed’s death anniversary on April 24. After going missing their bodies were found on Sunday in Khairpur Nathan Shah, it said.

Continue reading Violence in Kotri, Jamshoro after JSMM activists killed

Renowned writer, poet and journalist Shamsherul Hyderi dies

Writer, poet Shamsherul Hyderi passes away

SINDH – KARACHI: Renowned writer, poet, playwright and journalist Shamsherul Hyderi dies after prolong illness here on Friday.

He was around 80. He was recently shifted to the Aga Khan Hospital from a local private hospital. Earlier he had remained under treatment in Islamabad.

Hyderi left behind four daughters, a son, and thousands of friends and well wishers to mourn. He was buried in historical Chaukandi Graveyard situated at National Highway.

He was born on September 15, 1931 in coastal town of lower Sindh, Badin. He served in Federal Ministries of Information and Broadcasting, Communication and Youth Affairs, and retired in grade-19 in 1990. He also served the Sindhi Adabi Board, Jamshoro for 15 years as member publications and secretary.

Hyderi was writer of several books of poetry, literature, history, etc. He had started his career as broadcaster from PTV in 1970. He has written more than 100 Sindhi and Urdu plays and serials for PTV during his 38-year association with it, besides writing numerous songs both for PTV and radio.

He remained member Urdu Dictionary Board, Karachi for three years, and member Pakistan Films Censor Board, Karachi also for three years. He was member of Karachi Press Club and member of Pakistan Arts Council, Karachi.

Continue reading Renowned writer, poet and journalist Shamsherul Hyderi dies

23rd March 2012 Freedom March Rally in Karachi JSQM Chairmen Bashir Qureshi’s Speech – English Version

Long live Sindh Long live Sain GM Syed − The heirs of Sindh, My dear sisters and brethren! − I welcome you all cordially who came here from nook and corner for gathering in the capital city Karachi which is not only capital city but the heart of Sindh. − − عمر يست ڪه آواز منصور ڪهن شد − من از سرنو جلوه دهم دارو رسن را − (Time has elapsed that the voice of Mansoor has been obsolete; I want to re-embellish ropes and hang) − Sons of Sindh! − Pakistan has never been a country in any episode of history but the Sindh has remained such a motherland since thousands of years and has been bestowed with bounty of natural resources including fertile agricultural lands, roaring Indus River and coastal belt. Therefore the populace of Sindh has been the custodians of civilization when it was newly evolving elsewhere. − Out of excavation of Moen-Jo-Daro it reveals that the Sindh has traversed the different periods of olden civilizations since the period of Euphrates, Samaritans and Babylons. Comparative it was more civilized and prosperous then the contemporary civilizations of that period.

Continue reading 23rd March 2012 Freedom March Rally in Karachi JSQM Chairmen Bashir Qureshi’s Speech – English Version

Saparatist Sindhi nationalist leader & JSQM chairman Bashir Qureshi passes away

By: Amar Guriro

KARACHI – SINDH: Rrenowned Sindhi nationalist leader, chairman Jeay Sindh Qaumi Mahaz (JSQM) Bashir Kahn Qureshi has died on late Friday night. He was 54.

Qureshi was on his way to a small village Dari Magsi in Sakrand, district Benazirabad (Nawabshah) at the time.

Urdu television channels reported quoting initial reports that he died of fatal cardiac arrest, but despite several attempts the cause of the death was not confirmed.

Qureshi was a brave leader and spent all his life spreading the message of Great Leader Saeen G. M. Syed throughout Sindh and also struggling for Independent Sindhudesh.

In his last mammoth rally of an estimation of 0.7 million people chanting slogans of “Na Khapae na khapae, Pakistan Na Khapae” (We don’t want Pakistan) on M.A Jinnah Road of provincial capital city of Karachi-Sindh, he demanded international powers to help Sindhis to get their independent country—the Sindhudesh.

Political analysts are of the view that Qureshi’s death is great loose of nationalists who wants their independent country, the Sindhudesh.

Continue reading Saparatist Sindhi nationalist leader & JSQM chairman Bashir Qureshi passes away

Twin blasts hit transmission line in Sindh – The News Tribe report

By Abdullah Zafar

Jamshoro: Police on Thursday said that two bombs exploded in Jamshoro near Hyderabad damaged electricity towers.

District Police Officer (DPO) Farooq Jamali told media that twin bombs out of five planted on electricity poles exploded in the area, partially damaging 5500 KV transmission line. He said that three bombs were defused by the bomb disposal squad.

No organization has claimed responsibility so far. However, an obscure terrorist organization Sindudesh Liberation Front had claimed responsibility for series of blasts targeting rail track across the province this month.

Sindhi nationalists inclined toward separation from Pakistan have become active in Sindh following the US Congress resolution, espousing self-determination for Balochistan.

It is to mention here that the Sindhi nationalists regard Raja Dahir as hero of Sindhis and describe Muhammad bin Qasim, a Muslim conqueror, as robber.

Continue reading Twin blasts hit transmission line in Sindh – The News Tribe report

Naseem Thebo passes away

by Tania Thebo

Naseem Thebo, a renowned writer has passed today at her Karachi residence. Inna lillahi wa inna ilaihi raji’un – May her soul rest in eternal peace.

She was Daughter of renowned fiction writer Badam Natawan, sister of renowned political activist Mir Thebo and mother of Tania and Anita Thebo. She inherited the art of writing from her mother Badam Natawan. She was born in Shikarpur and she got an early education from Ghari, a village in Dadu district and did M.A. in Economics from University of Sindh Jamshoro. Born in a farmer family on her paternal side she observed the village life very closely and all the impinging images of village life later on got transformed into the short stories written by her. Although her father was not a typical wadero but even then there was enough misery and injustice faced by the village folks that left it’s mark on her sensitive mind. She wrote her first short story ” Ghoran Ji Rekha” meaning “line of teardrops” when she was studying in tenth standard. The subject of this story was poverty. Then she wrote many other short stories as well. Titles of her other stories are “Ghayal The Ghariyan” meaning “living being injured”, “Wadhay Jin Widhiyas”, “Mon Jherenday chadia” meaning “I left them fighting ” this story was written on the subject of separation of East Pakistan from west Pakistan,” Ubhur Chand Pas Piren” ” O Moon rise and behold my beloved”, “Rasando Bharjando Ghaav” meaning “Lacerating Healing Wound” , “Ahsas Ja Chak” etc. Most of the titles of her short stories are taken from the verses of great Sindhi Sufi Poet Shah Abdul Latif bhittai.

Continue reading Naseem Thebo passes away

SHAHEED ZULFIQAR ALI BHUTTO – SINDHI SPEECH

In 1969, Shaheed Zulfikar Ali Bhutto addressed students at Liaquat Medical College, Jamshoro, Sindh. He was allowed to speak on the condition that he would not talk about politics. However, in his speech, he said being a political animal, he could not refrain from speaking on the subject. He said the following:

If Shah Lateef were alive today, he would be behind the bars. For all his poetry is based on democratic ideas.

One unit is an evil. Were Shah Bhitai alive today, he would oppose One Unit.

– A child’s education should be in his/her mother tongue. No doubt Urdu and Bengali are national languages, I feel and as a minister I tried that Sindhi children be educated in Sindh.

Via → Sindhi e-lists/ e-groups → Mohammad Ali Mahar → YouTube

Ayaz Latif Palijo’s speech in Karachi, Sindh

The language of the is Sindhi.

YouTube

PPP is treating Sindh as PURCHASED SLAVE!

Deteriorating Sindh: PPP regime and our role

by: Zulfiqar Halepoto, Hyderabad, Sindh

I am writing these lines with great disappointment and anger on the state of affairs in Sindh in all sectors of governance and the conduct of present regime and especially the performance of PPP.

I have visited 18 districts of Sindh for a district level consultation to hear the voices of the people on six  issues education, health, food (agriculture, water and environment), housing, and natural resource management). This is an initiative of an international NGO.

Continue reading PPP is treating Sindh as PURCHASED SLAVE!

Jamshoro – The spirit of Sindh

By: Niilofur Farrukh

FOR someone who was born and brought up in Karachi, I must confess the cultural distance between the metropolis and the hinterland exists not just in miles. The inhabitants of the city, especially as young and brash as Karachi, have built a hybrid identity from the experience of constant change, chaos and cultural interface.

Meanwhile, the people of the interior of Sindh, steeped in the folklore and poetry of its Sufis, zealously guard the purity of their language and interpret life through the prism of conventions shaped by ancient history.

What Pakistan, a county that brought together heterogeneous people from all over South Asia, has needed since its inception is an education policy to unify cultures through knowledge and respect for pluralism. While this dream of the founding fathers is forgotten in the midst of political volatility and confrontation, opportunities for reconciliation and an understanding of Pakistan’s diverse traditions are lost.

As someone who was born in the decade that followed Partition, I grew up without the language skills to understand Bhitai and Bulleh Shah. It took a study of world cultures to feel the need to seek what was so close to me at Moenjodaro, Harappa, Sukkur, Taxila, Kohistan, Thar and Sibi.

A recent opportunity to visit Jamshoro, where I was invited to participate in the First International Art Seminar hosted by the Institute of Art and Design, Sindh University, led to three days of enriching dialogue.

To experience both intellectuals and fakir singers quoting Shah Latif’s verse like a mantra, almost like a verbal and musical talisman not unlike the black thread that is rubbed on the ‘sacred’ instruments of the mendicants at the shrine of the great saint, it took the urban cynic in me some time to understand how deeply woven in the social and cultural fabric is the Sufi message. No theoretical text or debate can convey the intrinsic connection with a timeless philosophy that expresses the concerns of the people in a language that resonates in them.

A renewed optimism among the students and faculty at the Institute of Art and Design seems to have come with the new building that the department recently got after years of struggle. With it appeared a desire to build a bridge between received knowledge and the dynamic ideas of the new century.

The seminar seemed to set the tone for this change by creating space for debate and discussion on a wide range of issues that confront artists as national and international scholars read their papers.

The exchange with poets, writers, scholars, artists and journalists on the artist’s role in society, however fundamental, was important in a society that exists on so many planes of social awareness. The multiple viewpoints presented by the participants communicated how art has moved from the linear thought process of modernism to a lateral embrace of visual culture which recognises context as a critical force.

It was refreshing to see the inclusion of two papers based on the field research of archeologists who are putting together fragments of the history of development of the image and its significance in prehistoric times. Dr Salim claimed the flint tools created from quartz in the Potohar Plateau were one of the earliest creative acts as the maker used his intelligence to select the material and then perfected a technique to craft its serrated edge.

Information on rock carving and cave drawings presented by Dr Ihsan Ali concentrated on the iconography of early man in Pakistan that art historians cannot ignore. The same was true of Dr Misbah Rasheed’s study on the hybrid symbolic imagery of the ceramic mosaic murals at the Lahore Fort that has yet to be studied in-depth and included in the art history curriculum which continues to be predominantly eurocentric.

Dr Ejaz Ikram’s thought-provoking talk focused on the crisis of beauty in the world created by the de-linking of art from intuition, intellect and spirituality that were once responsible for the meditative harmony of Islamic art. According to him, since beauty rests not in innovation but the truth, he urged artists not to abandon tradition but to perfect it if they wanted to rediscover beauty.

Presenting an opposing view was the talk on European design presented by ceramist Maliha Paracha. She highlighted innovative ceramics by the Dutch company Droog that has gained worldwide reputation for its unusual and unpredictable designs that do not compromise functionality.

The artists’ perspective at the seminar, among others, came from Sheherezade, the country’s pioneer potter. With her exquisite visuals, she elaborated on the influence of historical and cultural Lahore on her personal and professional life. The labyrinth of the walled city, Mughal minars that dominate the skyline and the timeless skill of artisans that creates traditional pottery all combined to give her a sense of identity which, along with a global interface, has helped her develop a contemporary vocabulary which has won her global recognition.

This brings to my mind the renowned artist Mona Hartoum whose art is unique to her life. Hartoum, a Palestinian who grew up as a refugee in Lebanon, was stranded in London for a long period due to the war in Lebanon before she decided to pursue her art education in the UK. The trauma of displacement made her restless. According to her, she finds it difficult to stay in one place for too long. This angst is evoked in her work as ideas are translated through material to convey anxiety and restlessness.

Centrality of context was a common thread that ran through the papers. The message for the new entrants in the art community seemed to be that as they learned what constituted art in the studio, and while learning theory, they would also have to remember that the most powerful expression and strongest voice come from lived experience.

In the soul of Jamshoro dwell many untold stories, both ancient and modern. Artists just need to discover them.

Coutesy: Daily Dawn

Source – http://www.dawn.com/2008/04/16/op.htm#3