Tag Archives: Indus

Punjab – Sindh : Troubled waters

Sindh

Editorial : Troubled waters

With both the Punjab and Sindh holding firm on their stance over the controversial opening of the Chashma-Jhelum link canal, which has led the member of the Indus River System Authority (Irsa) from Sindh and the federation to ready their resignations, the prime minister has been forced to intervene. He will be attempting to pour oil over the churning waters. But even as he does so, there seems to be a realisation that the structure of Irsa may need to be altered to prevent the periodic tidal waves that erupt and threaten to cause a great deal of damage.The orders issued by the member from the Punjab, who is also acting chairman of the authority, would serve the interests of his province but damage those of Sindh by reducing flow down the Indus. To rub salt into wounds, the Punjab has now sought additional water through the canal. There is quite evidently an element of selfishness in the way water is demanded by each province, heedless of the needs of others. The battles between the Punjab and Sindh represent nothing new. But if we look at the matter realistically and dispassionately, it seems almost inevitable that this will happen. The Punjab, as the majority province, has not been known for its sensitivity to the concerns of others. And hence the current acrimony on this issue, with the smaller provinces clearly feeling discriminated against.

Read more >>- The Express Tribune

End of the River?

Of the two largest Southasian deltas, one flourishes as the other faces the threat of being overrun by the sea.

by Amar Guriro

At a time when melting glaciers, shrinking coastal lands, depleting freshwater sources and vanishing forests are hot issues across the world, the tidal mangrove forests of the Sundarban constitute an encouraging example of effective conservation. Spread over 10,000 sq km in India and Bangladesh, with some 60 percent falling in the latter, the Sundarban, part of the Ganges delta, the world’s largest, takes in the endpoints of the mighty Ganga, Meghna and Brahmaputra rivers. A fusion zone of fresh- and saltwater, constituting a complex network of tidal waterways, vast scattered mudflats and hundreds of small islands filled with salt-tolerant mangroves, and home to a dizzying array of plants and animals, the Sundarban was recognised as a World Heritage Site in 1987.

Continue reading End of the River?

Indus river : No one bothers about water problem: Abbasi

By Mohammad Hussain Khan

HYDERABAD, Nov 7: Eminent water expert and former chairman of the Technical Committee on Water Resources A.N.G Abbasi has said his report on water should be buried once and for all as no one seems to be ready to implement it.

Continue reading Indus river : No one bothers about water problem: Abbasi

Water theft

IRSA Sindh chief resigns

KARACHI: The chairman Indus River System Authority (IRSA), Amanullah Khan, has resigned from his post citing his inability to perform the duties.

In a letter to Ministry of Water and Power, he said it was difficult to carry out his official obligations so he was tendering his resignation.

The sources in IRSA Sindh said Sindh usually receives its irrigation water quota by May 7 every year but due to closure of CJ Link Canal, the Sindh growers have lost the benefit of May weather on the crops.

“Water theft is on the rise in Punjab and other provinces are not getting their due share of irrigation water,” he added.

Usually water from CJ Link Canal is released by April 15 every crop season but this time, Sindh is still waiting for its water share.

Sindh is still waiting for around 65,000 cusecs of water of its quota, whereas province has only received 23,000 cusecs of water this season, he maintained. The Punjab government released about 25,000 cusecs water from CJ Link Canal during 17 days of talks with Sindh officials.

Read more >>- Daily Times

Courtesy:  http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=20106\30\story_30-6-2010_pg5_12

Dams must be dismantled

By: Prof. Gul Agha

Dams have allowed the powerful and corrupt elite to create new lands upstream and rob the poor people downstream.

Dams have blocked 90% of silt flow, destroyed forest in the flood plains and turned Sindh into desert Sindh. The river brings not only water but rich soil — just as important for agriculture and to protect the sea water from encroaching.

All dams must be dismantled — the advanced countries are all dismantling dams. Water conservation is essential, therefore, the best storage is small lakes built downstream.

28/04/2008

Kalabagh: Development or Disaster

By ABRAR KAZI

Sindh Water Committee and Anti–Greater Thal Canal Committee, Hyderabad

Courtesy: Daily Dawn

THIS refers to Engr Mazhar Ali’s article ‘Kalabagh dam: development or disaster’ (April 29) in which he has spoken about the merits of constructing new dams on the River Indus. In the footnote he has been described as a member of the Technical Committee on Water Resources (TCWR). But unless there was a printing error in the report (Dawn, Dec 27, 2005), the committee member was Dr Iqbal Ali.

Continue reading Kalabagh: Development or Disaster

Sindhi Women’s Delegation Highlights the Plight of Sindh at UNPO General Assembly in Rome

Press Release: 4th June 2010 – The Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization (Headquartered in The Hague, Netherlands and with an office in Brussels, Belgium ) held its 10th General Assembly session in Rome, Italy from 27 to 29 May 2010… Sindh is represented at the UNPO through World Sindhi Institute, based in USA and Canada, and is also represented in the 11 member Presidency (steering commitee) as well.

Continue reading Sindhi Women’s Delegation Highlights the Plight of Sindh at UNPO General Assembly in Rome

Understanding Sindh and Sindhis

Sourcing Haidarabad – By: Kanak Mani Dixit

Even though PIA Flight 269 was bound from Kathmandu to Karachi, I was excited to visit the Sindhi Hyderabad. For too long, the Deccan city and capital of Andhra, with its IT glamour, had wrested the limelight from its humbler counterpart. Lo! Even the screen indicating the Pakistani Airbus’s flight-path showed the Deccan Hyderabad, but not the city by the Indus to which I was bound.

From the Karachi airport, ‘Haidarabad’, as it is properly pronounced, is a two-and-a-half-hour drive through the rolling desert along the M9 motorway. The city is reached after descending a plateau and crossing a rivulet – in actuality, the great River Indus in its emaciated present-day avatar. There, a traveller crosses eastward, over a bridge that seems too long for a flow this miniscule, even though it is supposed to be the consolidated flow of all six tributaries upstream. India has tapped the three eastern rivers under the auspices of the Indus River Treaty, and Pakistani Punjab takes copious draughts from the remaining three.

The inhabitants of Sindh seem impelled by the force of history to speak of their great past – the great Indus civilisation and its archaeological remains, the conquests of Iskandar, the rise of the Sindhi language, Buddhism, Sufism and the arrival of Islam. Those were the times when the Indus flowed with strength, and contrasts with a beleaguered present are unavoidable. With the river nearly gone, Sindhis seek to preserve their pride in the Ajrak block-printed shawls that are presented to visitors, and in the vibrant Sindhi press that challenges Urdu as the language of political discourse.

Continue reading Understanding Sindh and Sindhis

Conflict between Sindh and Punjab – Is it real or unreal?

FayazBbriroFuss between Punjab and Sindh! Is it natural, or exploitation?

By: Fayaz Amar Buriro

I have found some amazing similarities between Punjab and Sindh, where I shocked to see that majority of our regional activists are aloof from these facts. Here I am trying to show some of these:

>>Indus Valley Civilization (IVC) contains Sindh & Punjab, … the Moen-jo-Daro & Harappa are vital proofs.

»In history, there were Great India and Persia, which had large scope of sovereignty. The Baluchistan was buffer state between Persia and India.

»There is a Natural boundary between Sindh & Baluchistan to keep them safe and protect from each other, the same is not with Punjab and Sindh. There is no any natural boundary between Punjab and the Sindh. More over for the better understanding to the culture and language both have one mixed race nation called Siraiki. This nation is working natural way of exchanging the parameters of Sindh as well as Punjab.

»Sindh & Punjab have same agriculture based economy; this base is not with Baluchistan.

»Before the Islam, Sindhis and Punjabis both were religiously Hindus, but when we look in Baluchs, they were Kurd mixed old dogma believers.

»The linguistic grammar and rhythm of Sindhi & Punjabi are same because both languages born from ancient Sanskrit. Baluchi language came from Persian accent.

»The folk music or literature of Punjab and Sindh is very same in against of Baluchistan which is totally different. Their musical instrument and note of ragas are totally different than Punjab or Sindh.

» The philosophical approach & psyche of Sindh and Punjab was (and is) same rather than Baluchistan. Both had vast inspired Vedanti Mysticism (Sufism). Shah Lateef, Sachal Sarmast Bullah Shah, Fareed, Waris Shah Mehr Ali are lively legends of the philosophy from both states.

»In past, there are multiple proofs that Sindh and Baluchistan fought on interests and lost thousands people from both sides in different wars, but there is no any tiny proof has been found that Punjab fought with Sindh on any issue.

» In Sindhi Society, the extremist acts like Karo Kari , robbery, theft psyche, murders etc are well gifted by Baluchistan, such sort of crimes are linked together between the inner Baluchistan even up to the now a days too. According to the geography if we classified the Sindh in to two parts then we are finding following sub regions:»

1.Right Bank of Indus: As agricultural issues this bank is not well furnished and rich as comparison with other bank. Mostly Balochs occupied in this bank, that’s why the bank is topmost nest of criminals. They even smuggle currency, involved in human trafficking, kidnapping and harassing the other communities. Overall if we overview on this bank then we would find the majority of Baluchistan based headmen, those are ruling over the conflicts of tribal issues, they make daily new issues for the murders of innocent people on the issue of tribal wars.

2.Left Bank of Indus: This bank of Indus has good agricultural lands and almost peaceful atmosphere. The ruling headmen belonging with old Sindhi castes. The Baluchi influence is not much here, that’s why they live in peace and harmony. Today the history witness that most classical poets belong with this bank, who taught to live in peace and love.

»The Punjabi settlers who came in Sindh since 1940 (mostly Punjabi came here before 40’s) had started the cultivating agriculture and shown their keen hard work with the land. Today they have built villages, live in peace and prosperity in the Sindh. They don’t involve in criminal practices, they have given their daughters to local Sindhis for marriages. And the other hands Baluchis have really made hell regarding in the peace and to maintaining law & order situations. They shown their own psyche in criminal activities. Today Baluchis people are not wealth handed labors as comparison with Punjabi settlers.

»In aspects of refuges race, Baluchis & Punjabis are both migrated nations who came here for the interests regarding with their betterment of lives. Punjabis started their own profession as farming lands and Baluchis had shown their own. They spread criminal activities and on the shoulders of black wealth they became headmen, politicians and achieved multiple trades. Today they are more than 70% holding local politics up to the higher level seats of assemblies, where from they are acting their best sincerity with the Sindh and local settlers. Irony is that they are largely headmen of national politics in the Sindh. Syeds are second top numbered politicians of Sindh. Amazing is that they are also refugee.

»Today the Sindhi language is a lively language and according to the UNISCO report about the languages the Sindhi language is totally safe and will survive with vigor capacity in even next century as Punjabi too. But the Baluchi language and its accent are in red zone. Today near about 26 accents of Baluchi language are died due to showing least efforts to save the language by their speakers.

»The history of conflict between Sindh & Punjab is not much old but after the partition of Indo-Pak. In the partition Sindhis have faced enormous difficulties and withdrawn its middle class in shape of Hindus who had migrated from Sindh. The second effect was fallen on Punjab who lost its left arm (East Punjab). But no any sign is visible in which we can see that Baluchistan had lost any identity or economical downfall in the partition.

»It’s the very touchy sense in grief of Sindhi labor, but its fact; that Punjabis had taught the new ways of agro-technology and market concern environment to the Sindhis, but its very invisible any proof that Baluchis have given any expertise to local Sindhis except short cut methodologies, trickery ways to success wealth.

»Today if Sindhis are well elaborated in every field of life then there is partly pushes of Punjab; otherwise on the shoulders of Baluchis, Sindhi might be in the age of tribal system.

Hence the question comes in our mind that in old times Punjab and Sindh had passed really golden age, then when and where from their fuss started?

I’ve found some amazing reasons that:

*The history of current conflicts is not too old than 70 years before. It started from when Sindh separated from Bombay in 1936.

*Sindh has get rid of Mulla but Punjab has been pulling up the Mullas, due to its 2 nation theory.

*Sindh has aliened Germany forces in 2nd World War in the shape of 3rd Hur Movement, but Punjab had totally aside with alliance forces with British Army. And when Britain announced the Pakistan and India as free countries, they went and given gift the whole Pakistan to Punjab. And the issue arose from the starting day.

*The riot or conflicts between Sindh and Punjab are not natural but the self made from some politicians who never want to make a peaceful atmosphere here. Those politicians can be classified in following cadres:

1.US Foreign Policy Makers.

2.Punjab Opportunists.

3.Some greedy Sindhi Nationalists leaders.

May be I am wrong but here I have shared , what ever I’ve found!

Courtesy: FayazBuriro.com

Source – http://www.fayazburiro.com/research/spf.html

Global Perspective of Sindhu Vas Magazine (Fragrance of Indus)

by Jagdeesh Ahuja, Hyderabad, Sindh

1.Message of Universal Love, Peace and Prosperity. 2.Elimination of War and Poverty. 3.Emancipation from all forms of slavery and exploitation. 4.Creation & construction of Humane Society. 5.Peaceful co-existence of all civilizations. 6.Sindhu Vas is a concept based on Sindhu (Indus) Civilization. Its canvas is spread over Himalayas to Hindi (Sindhi) Ocean. 7.Peaceful resolution of all disputes including matter of water distribution among all Sindhu Vasis.

Empires of the Indus: The Story of a River

Courtesy: Empiresof the Sindh

One of the longest rivers in the world, the Indus rises in Tibet, flows west across India, and south through Pakistan. For millennia it has been worshiped as a god; for centuries used as a tool of imperial expansion. Today it is the glue of Pakistan‘s fractious union.

Publication date: 15 May 2008, Published by John Murray

Continue reading Empires of the Indus: The Story of a River

Dams upriver hurting people living downstream

VOICES FROM MEKONG

By – ACHARA ASHAYAGACHAT

When 42-year-old Zhang Chun Shan, a Chinese farmer-cum-activist , told a public forum in Bangkok this week that he was unaware of the negative impact his great nation’s hydropower projects have caused to neighbouring countries downstream, a hundred participants understood him.

“I feel sorry for you; the downstream communities have problems with their fisheries and floods [after the dam construction] but we upstream people face the problems of soil erosion and villagers’ relocation,” said Mr Zhang, director of Lijiang City Environmental Volunteer Organisation.
The forum, entitled “Mekong Mainstream Dams: Voices Across Borders” was held last week at Chulalongkorn University.
How could the Chinese people know of the suffering of people in other countries? They do not even know about the hardships of their compatriots. “Because the local and central governments never tell anyone how we – communities affected by dams – are suffering,” mourned Mr Zhang, who comes from Yunnan province.
Niwat Roykeow, a former headmaster of Chiang Khong School in Chiang Rai province, accused the Chinese dams – Manwan, Dachaoshan and Jinghong – of causing the heaviest floods in Chiang Saen in four decades last August.
“At least three districts have yet to recoup the financial loss of 85 million baht, not to mention the heartbreak of being fooled by authorities that dams help prevent flooding, serve agriculture and produce electricity, ” said the 47-year-old Niwat.
He called on China to take responsibility for the suffering of the downstream people and urged the lower-Mekong governments to be more collaborative with their own people in seeking compensation from the upstream nation.
China expert Vorasakdi Mahatdhanobol from Chulalongkorn University said that if China wants to rise gracefully and in a sustainable manner, Beijing needs to conduct an impartial study of its dams’ impact on the riparian countries and release it publicly.
But the Mekong River Commission’s (MRC) chief executive officer Jeremy Bird argued that the MRC’s own study showed that the Chinese dams did not contribute to the flood; it was a natural event.
Montha Achariyakul, a community organiser in Bo Keo, Pongsali and Luang Prabang in Laos, said the Lao people did not believe rainfall was the cause.
“Headmen in northern Lao provinces warned their villagers that China would release more water from their dams. Despite the alert, a thousand households and their rice and corn fields were damaged,” said Ms Montha.
Montree Chantawong, from Thai People’s Network for Mekong, added that the MRC River Monitoring website still showed a “green sign” for Chiang Saen and Chiang Khong during the week of August 11-14 even though the area was inundated at that time.
The two-day seminar was not meant to talk about the already-built dams or to point the finger at any particular agency, but to raise awareness and plead for policy-makers at all levels, national and regional, and among international organisations as well as the private sector, to pay more attention to the voices of the people living along the river.
Participants were trying to forge a more concrete solidarity in order to hold future projects accountable to the people. Those projects are now at their doorstep.
Over the next few years, Laos is said to be constructing at least seven dams with a total electricity generating capacity of 7,470 megawatts, while another two Thai-Lao projects will see a total of 3,409mw dams. Cambodia will have a 980mw dam in Stung Treng and another 2,600mw dam in Sambor.
Investors from China, Thailand, Malaysia, Russia and Vietnam are reportedly involved in the projects at Pak Beng, Luang Prabang, Xayaburi, Xanakham, Lat Sua, Don Sahong in Laos, and at Pak Chom and Ban Koum along the Thai-Lao border, and two provinces in Cambodia.
The seminar also saw a strong argument regarding the impact on fish stocks in the world’s seventh largest river, if more dams were to be built mid- and downstream of the Mekong.
“The issue is not about what will happen to the fish, but to the people whose livelihood relies heavily on fishery along this river,” said Chris Barlow, from the MRC Fisheries Programme.
The Mekong has the world’s largest inland fishery with 1.5-3 million tonnes a year. In 2000 it was 2.6 million tonnes, said Mr Barlow, adding that the real fishery economy was estimated at US$2-3,000 million per annum.
The MRC fish expert noted that reservoir fisheries could not compensate for lost river fisheries and aquaculture could not be a full replacement for captured fishery due to the added costs and different beneficiaries.
Professor Philip Hirsch from the Australian Mekong Resource Centre said that unless the 1995 agreement that created the MRC was revised to include civil society voices and concerns into the government-dominate d process, future relations between the MRC and civil society would remain an unfruitful dispute.
Apart from the agreement amendment, the colossal task is to accommodate China’s entry into the sub-regional body, noted Mr Hirsch.
So the MRC, NGOs and other players needed to find ways to overcome the lack of meaningful engagement that has marked the past 13 years, he said.
Jonathan Conford of Oxfam Australia, took the Asian Development Bank to task for failing to live up to its pledges of poverty alleviation, environmental conservation and sustainability.
At the ADB’s annual meeting early this year, president Haruhido Kuroda listed as priorities in the ADB’s new long-term strategic commitment, more of the same agenda – infrastructure development, regional integration, private facilitation – all under the banner of inclusive growth, said Mr Conford.
But the weight of accumulating evidence in the Mekong Region, he said, is pointing to the need for a fundamental rethink of the GMS orthodoxies around infrastructure, growth and poverty alleviation.
“Sixteen years of accelerated infrastructure development and natural resource extraction have led to irrevocable damage to the region’s ecological systems and hugely growing disparities between the rich and the poor and between ethnic groups,” the Australian activist said.
Dr Sombath Somporn, the 2005 Ramon Magsaysay award recipient for community leadership, said Laos may consider itself as a battery of the region by supplying electricity to Southeast Asia, but for how long can it sustain this?
“We need to re-educate the young people that water and light are interlinked; if we use water unwisely or energy unwisely we will have none left. We should not consume till everything depletes.”
Dr Sombath also called for more corporate responsibility in implementing hydropower projects.
“Shareholders and board members of concerned agencies including the Mekong River Commission, and the Asian Development Bank should be held accountable to their noble pledges to fight against climate change. Stopping building or supporting construction of the non-EIA-checked dams is one way to help prevent global warming,” he said.
He suggested that maybe it was time for ecological degradation to be accounted into the monetary cost of carrying out a project.
Courtesy and Thanks: Bangkokpost.com
http://www.bangkokpost.com/141108_News/14Nov2008_news21.php

Save River Indus : Small dams more harmful than Kalabagh dam

Govt should not build small dams, says Abbasi

By Mohammad Hussain Khan

Courtesy: dawn

HYDERABAD: Eminent water expert and former chairman of the Technical Committee on Water Resources (TCWR) A.N.G. Abbasi said on Friday that small dams were more harmful than Kalabagh dam and advised the government to refrain from building them.

Continue reading Save River Indus : Small dams more harmful than Kalabagh dam

Book review – Harvest Will Come (New Book by Iqbal Tareen)

A new book by an American of Sindhi-Pakistani origin is published. The book contains selected articles, correspondence and speeches of Mr. Tareen, who is a noted human rights, and political rights activist.  Mr. Tareen is former President of Sindhi Association of North America (SANA) and founder President of Jeeay Sindh Students Federation (JSSF) (1960-70s). Mr. Tareen is current president of Washington based civic group called “Forum for Democracy and Justice in Pakistan” The book contains Mr. Tareen’s vision for Pakistan and Sindh, socio-economic and Political challenges that country and province face.

It also contains correspondence between him and Mohtarma Shaheed Benazir Bhutto, his few letters to US administration including Secretary of State, Chairman Senate Foreign Relations Committee and now VP Joe Biden, his speeches to different protest demonstration outside White House on democracy issues in Pakistan. The Book also reflects on his association with politicians of Sindh late GM Syed and Rasool Bux Palijo.

Book provides Writer’s excellent reflections on Sindh and his vision under several articles such as :

1. Sindh on the Threshold of 21th Century,

2. Sindh in the Eye of Terror,

3. Sindh Vision 2020,

4. US Sindhis Demand equity in Indus Commission,

5. 11 Guardians of Indus,

6. Chauvinism lurking out of Punjab,

7. Sindh is mother of Pakistan,

8. Government warned against division of Sindh

And the master piece of the book is valuable, thoughtful and beautiful article “Harvest will come” the title of the book, which is an excellent & refreshing analysis of change in modern history specially since 1820 to latest, how world has moved forward over the years, and writer believes “No matter how hard they try they cannot deny you dreams and hope. They might have stolen the day but tomorrow belongs to you.

Have faith, the harvest will come.

The Book is useful for those who have interest in Sindh’s Political issues, democracy in Pakistan and its American connections, also how does enlightened Pakistani Diaspora thinks of its own country.

For Contact Author Iqbal Tareen at iqbal.tareen@gmail.com

The Fall of the Indus Empire

Aryan Invasion and Fall of the Indus Empire

Nomadic Aryans invaded India ca. 1500 BC destroying the Indus valley civilization and exterminating the Indus inhabitants. Thus ended the most brilliant civilization of the ancient world. Subsequent to this invasion, India was plunged into 2000 years of the Vedic Dark Ages. When cities were built again, it was under Scytho-Greek influence. The ziggurat of the Indus disappeared forever.

Continue reading The Fall of the Indus Empire

A Seminar on ‘People of Sindh’ in Manchester, UK

sindhicivilization– ALI MEMON, London, UK

May 17, 2009

London: World Sindhi Congress is arranging a seminar hosting eminent writer, journalist, historian and scholar Ms Alice Albania, on Saturday 20th June 2009 from 13.00 – 16.00 pm at Friends Meeting House, 6 Mount Street, City Centre, Manchester, M2 5NS, UK.

Alice Albania, is author of ‘Empires of Indus’ book on religious and political history of the Indus region. Empires of the Indus is her first book, for which she won a Royal Society of Literature / Jerwood Foundation Special Prize for non-fiction work in progress.

The title of the seminar is ‘People of Sindh’ and will focus on the relationship of Indus River with its people, its ancient multi-religious roots and the advancement of its oldest civilizations spreading from Indian Ocean to Tibetan plateaus. In addition, seminar will also provide an opportunity to understand the current struggle of Indigenous people of Sindh and their national identity as juxtaposed to the increasing religious identities in other parts of Pakistan.

Historical Look at Hingol : Hinglaj Devi was last mother queen of Matriarchal era of Indus Valley

Another name of Hinglaj Devi is Goddess Naina which is very akin to Goddess Nania of Sumerian Civilization

by Jagdeesh Ahuja, Hyderabad, Sindh.

Originally Hinglaj has nothing to do with religion or nationalism. Hinglaj is the historical monument of Sindhu Civilization. Hingol was one of the great many kingdoms of Sapta Sindhva (Sindhu des of seven rivers) and Hinglaj Devi was last mother queen of matriarchal era of Indus Valley. Another name of Hinglaj Devi is Goddess Naina which is very akin to Goddess Nania of Sumerian Civilization. The great poet of Indus Valley, Shah Latif called her “Nani Ama(n)” and after then Hinglaj Temple became famous as Temple of Nani Ama(n) especially in the Muslim populace. And Hinglaj Yatra has now got a great new altitude beyond religious divide.

We are unfortunate people who disown our own history. Ironically people of India own our monuments of ancient civilization as their sacred religious shrines and we are ever ready to give up our past and destroy our future. What a great alienation and ignorance of our own history! How can one weigh the advantages of destruction of Harappa, Taxila or Mohen-jo-daro!? Hinglaj is even more ancient than these historical sites. Mehargarh and Hinglaj are the monuments of advent of civilization. Legend of Shiva Parpati explains the transition of matriarchal era to patriarchal era. Shiva is the first male god of Sindhu Civilization whose whole Shakti (Power) was enshrined in his spouse Parpati (Hinglaj Devi) that is why she is also called Shakti Devi. It is well known fact that Shiva was the Lord of Indigenous Dravidian people of Indus Valley. When they were forced to migrate to Ganges Valley by Central Asian Aryan invaders, they continued to worship their Lord Shiva there. Long after the Aryans settled in Sapta Sindhva and owned Shiva along with their Lord Indra (God of Storm), people of Ganges valley started to visit the land of their ancestors. Hence the tradition of Hinglaj Yatra took place.

We must not forget the fact that the word Hindu itself is nothing but Sindhu. The Persians pronounced Sindhu as Hindu. And later Greek invaders pronounced Hindu as Indu, thence words Indus and India came into existence. Due to our ignorance we have lost sense of our history. Religious and nationalistic narrow mindedness has blurred our vision. Hinglaj doesn’t belong to any single religion or nation only, it is a great asset of Indus Valley and heritage of whole humanity, which should be put in the World Heritage list of UNESCO.

The Silk route & the ancient Indus Valley

By Aftab Kazi, PhD

Silk was among the items exported from the ancient Indus Valley emporiums to Mesopotamian city-states approximately 4000 years ago through both land and sea-borne silk-routes. Historically China has maintained cross-continental trade through the port cities of the Indus Basin River state, i.e. Sindh, Ind, Hind, Al-Hind respectively, the land areas that are now called Pakistan. Most recent early medieval example is that of the Kushan Empire (included land areas comprising modern Central Asia, Pakistan with a thin inland incursion into Bharat up to Mathura) which also had an excellent relationship with China. Both empires traded silk, spices, malmal (cotton cloth made in Sindh), indigo, etc all the way to Roman Empire through the Indus port city of Barbarikon (ruins of Barbarikon are likely to be that of Bhambhore located approximately 50 klometers from modern Karachi. This was the sea-borne silk-route link. Suez Canal did not exist then.

Ships sailed from Barbarikon via the coast of modern Oman and Arabia, entered Red Sea, from where they used the delta canals of River Niles to enter Mediterranean, hence traveled to Greece and Rome. There were two routes to sail. One for winter and the other for summer. I have cited this sea-borne Silk-route in my chapter on Pakistan in SF Starr (ed.) New Silk Roads:…, (Washington, DC: Central Asia-Caucasus Institute, Johns Hopkins University, 2007). Earliest records of ancient Silk-routes are available in the travel accounts of Sindhbad, an inhabitant of Sindh (modern Pakistan) under the title of “Sindhbad’s travels”, also spelled as “Sindbad”. Although somewhat fictionalized, this book is the most earliest treatise available on ancient Silk Roads. This book was translated from ancient Sindhi to Persian in medieval times and has been further translated into several modern languages including the English language…

Source – http://www.silkroadstudies.org/new/inside/staff/staff_ web/aftab_kazi.htm

http://www.aftabkazi.com

International Conference on The Sindhu-Sarasvati Civilization

by Manzoor Chandio, Karachi, Sindh

An international conference on the Sindhu-Sarasvati Valley Civilization will be held in Los Angeles, at Loyola Marymount University, Feb. 21 and 22, 2009. Prominent scholars in the field will present their findings regarding the people and culture of ancient..

The aim of the conference is to discuss, reconsider and reconstruct a shared identity of the Sindhu (Indus) and Saraswati cultures using archaeological and other scientific evidences as well as Vedic literature.

Discussion Themes:

1. Time: Chronology of Indus Valley and Vedic Cultures.

2. People: Linguistic Relationship

3 Place: Geographical location: The Saraswati and the Indus cultural habitats

4. Patterns of Cultural Interactions: Trade, Religion, Polity.

5. Origins: Homeland, Migration.

6. Continuities: Biological, Ethnological

Individual talks for 30 minutes, with 15 minute Q&A time.

Time: 9.00 am to 6.00 pm – Feb 21, 2009

9.00 am to 2.00 pm-Feb 22, 2009

Participants:

Jonathan Mark Kenoyer ( University of Wisconsin)

B.B. Lal (Former DG, Archaeological Survey of India)

Jim G. Shaffer ( Case Western Reserve University)

Carl C. Lamberg-Karlovsky ( Harvard University)

S.R.Rao (Archaeological Survey of India and NIO)

Edwin Bryant ( Rutgers University)

Vijendra Kumar Kashyap (National Institute of Biologicals, India)

Maurizio Tosi ( University of Bologna , Italy )

Ashok Aklujkar ( University of British Columbia)

R.S. Bisht (Archaeological Survey of India)

Louis Flam ( City University of New York)

Dennys Frenez ( University of Bologna)

Shiva Bajpai (California State University, Northridge)

Nicholas Kazanas ( Omilos Meleton Cultural Institute , Athens )

Subhash Kak ( Oklahama State University)

The papers presented at the conference will be made available to the people at the venue and later published as a volume about the origins, people and culture of the Indus/Sindhu Valley and Saraswati Valley civilizations.

Sponsors:

Doshi Bridgebuilder Endowment, Loyola Marymount University

Nalanda International

Soka University of America

Classics and Archaeology, Loyola Marymount University.

College of Liberal Arts, Loyola Marymount University

Advisory Committee:

Damodar Sardesai (Professor Emeritus of History, UCLA)

Navin Doshi (President, Nalanda International)

Nalini Rao (Professor of Art History, Soka University of America/ Director of Sindhu-Saraswati Conference)

Christopher Key Chapple (Doshi Professor of Indic and Comparative Theology, LMU),

Debashish Banerji (Art Historian, Executive Director, Nalanda International)

Manzoor Chandio’s Blog: http://manzoorchandio.blogspot.com

From the archive of the history: Mass movement in Sindh- Every minute has story to tell

By Anne Weaver, Special to The Christian Science Monitor

In a surprisingly strong, rural mass movement in Sindh – the first such political movement outside the cities that Pakistan has seen – thousands have continued their defiance of General Zia’s martial law regime. At least 38 people have died in the protests. According to opposition sources, 80 are dead. The opposition claims 7,000 have been arrested or successfully ”courted arrest.” The government acknowledges that some 1,400 Sindis are under arrest.

Driving through Sindh’s interior, where slate hills turn to desert and large tracts of rice, wheat, and cotton fields are flooded by monsoon rains, one is struck by the poverty. There are few development programs here.

People live on the margin of an agricultural economy. One passes through a score of hamlets and villages hugging the banks of the Indus River.

In recent weeks, they have all, in one way or another, protested against the Zia regime or gone on the rampage. They have defied police lines, been beaten back by teargas or a lathi charge. They have burned government buildings, disrupted transportation links, broken into Sindhi jails and court buildings, or engaged in general strikes.

Inside the dirty, overcrowded jail in Dadu, one of Sind’s most violent, up-river towns 200 miles from Karachi, 77 political prisoners told why they were willing to defy martial law, endure flogging, and go before special military courts-martial whose sessions last less than five minutes.

Their reasons for submitting to the punishment are as eclectic as the four provinces of Pakistan.

The province of Punjab, they acknowledge, is the key to the longevity of the Zia regime. If the country’s most populous province, its breadbasket and dispenser of army positions and posts in the federal bureaucracy, does not enter the protest, Zia and his army will probably be able to control the situation here in Sindh.

But, that is not the end, they add quickly. In Sindh, the fuse has been lit. And, if the protest is confined within this southern province’s borders, if others do not join, it will give far greater impetus to the more radical voices favoring Sindi independence, a movement called ”Sinduh-Desh.”

All of the young men crammed into one of the barracks of Dadu’s prison want to speak. They include medical students, provincial government civil servants, workers, shopkeepers, and peasants. Most are supporters of Mr. Bhutto’s Pakistani People’s Party, which has always dominated the politics of Sind. Others belong to the ”Sinduh-Desh” movement or are followers of the traditional ”sardars” or hereditary ”pirs.”

Some are political protesters, demanding a return to democracy and the end of martial law, others are protesting Zia’s Islamization program – most interior Sindis are Sufi Muslims who charge that General Zia has made heresy of the Koran. Still others are there at the behest of their ”sardars,” who have refused to pay the Islamic ”usur” land tax, on their vast holdings, which dominate the Indus River valley of Sindh. Some are here because they went to the streets to avenge Mr. Bhutto’s death. Others are followers of G. M. Sayed, the father of Sindhi nationalism, a hereditary ”pir,” who is the guiding force behind the Sinduh-Desh movement.

Strangers here are eyed with suspicion. But when people discover a journalist , they immediately want to talk. It is not surprising that their primary topic of conversation is their long-time resentment over domination by governments, armies, and bureaucracies coming from the Punjab region.

Protests sweep Pakistan in effort to restore democracy

Courtesy: CSM

Nirmala’s ashes immersed in Indus

By Waseem Shamsi

SUKKUR, May 17, 2008: The ashes of Nirmala Deshpande, an Indian peace and human rights activist, were immersed in the Indus River at the steps of the Sadhu Bela temple on Saturday. The peace activist had said in her will that her ashes should be immersed in all rivers in South Asia.

A 250-member delegation representing the India-Pakistan peace committee, whose members arrived here from different parts of Pakistan, participated in the ceremony to pay homage to Nirmala Deshpande for her efforts for making South Asia a peaceful region for all nations.

Respected internationally, Nirmala Deshpande played a leading role in various peace movements in South Asia over the last six decades.

It was her desire to make South Asia a region free of nuclear weapons. She also played a key role for bringing people of different religions closer to each other.

The peace committee delegation was led by secretary Karamat Ali and attended by member Miss Anoosha Alam and her nine-year-old daughter Nisa Alam.

Nirmala Deshpande had desired in her will a young girl should be employed for performing the immersion ceremony.

In accordance with the will, the ceremony was led by little Nisa Alam. Immersing ceremonies for Nirmala’s ashes have already been performed at Ganges and Jumuna and other rivers in South Asian countries.

Courtesy: Daily Dawn

Sindhu Putra, Spiritual Leader of Sindhu Civilization in 5000 BC

By: Gul Karamchand

It was with utmost interest that I read Theme no. 9 at about Sindhu Putra, the Spiritual Leader of Sindh and the subcontinent in 5,000 BCE.

It is a marvelous account, with dramatic highlights, and touches the heart. Certainly it is worth reading, circulating. and reprinting.

The brutal assassination of Sindhu Putra in 5,000 BC brings home to us with sadness that the sacred soil of Sindh has, from time immemorial, suffered from brutality, violence, murder as also executions under false legal cover and assai nation of the best and brightest by hired guns.

To see this theme 9, please open http://www.sindhulogy.org and a click of the top heading of ‘Projects’, will list the themes from Return of the Aryans – and among those is Theme 9 about Sindhu Putra.