Tag Archives: GHQ

No one else but people of Sindh will chose

With no freedom to chose within Pakistan, people of Sindh will chose freedom…

Iqbal Tareen, Washington, DC

People of Sindh clearly see a Noora Kushty in conflict between PML (N) and MQM. Politically naive people couldn’t get the drift of MQM at all. MQM excels in “Use and lose” game. In my book “Harvest will come” I had predicted that MQM will stab PPP in the back because Nawaz Sharrif and MQM have common family tree going all the way to Zia-ul-Haq. Combined with all other rightist parties this is another IJI, which is once again engaged against a party that was not manufactured in GHQ. Many so-called “progressive and people friendly activists” have been taken for a ride.

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Why not a civilian head of ISI?

By Kamran Shafi

Courtesy: Daily Dawn, Tuesday, 17 Nov, 2009

IN view of the fact that the cardinal sin of the federal government to try and put the ISI under civilian control is cited as a reason behind all the obituaries presently being written about the imminent fall of a) just the president; b) all the major politicians; and c) the whole shoot, I’ve been trolling through the Internet to see how just many of the world’s top intelligence services are headed by serving military (in Pakistan’s case, read ‘army’) officers. And how many are appointed by the army chief. Consider what I’ve come up with.

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Kerry-Lugar bill – by Farooq Sulehria

A letter to Nawaz Sharif on KLB

Dear Mr. Sharif,

Salam. To be honest, I was not surprised at all to find you and khakis on the same side of fence in case of Kerry-Lugar Bill (KLB). Only a naïve would have believed the radical statements you made about army’s role in politics in the waning months of Pervez Musharraf. How unfortunate! our politicians oppose GHQ’s intervention only selectively. The late Benazir Bhutto welcomed Musharraf’s move on October 12, the way you had hailed her military-sponsored expulsion from Prime Minster’s palatial secretariat. Back in 1980s, many believed her when she would challenge General Zia. On coming to power, she pinned Democracy Medal on General Beg’s malicious chest. Many believed you too when you would grill Musharraf ‘Saab’ (you did not like to call him a general). A year down the line and Shahbaz Sharif was found sneaking his way to GHQ’s in the thick of night.

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Opinion : Power slipping away from Zardari’s hands

by: Tausif Kamal

It seems that the GHQ and the right wing fundamental lobby in Pakistan are rattled by the pro- civilian, pro-democracy policy towards Pakistan of President Obama and this US Administration as indicated by the provisions of the Kerry Lugar Bill…The GHQ and its fundo lobby I think senses the power slipping away from their hands and hence they would do anything to weaken the democratic govt. and to overthrow President Zardari, for instance by playing the ‘national security’ card…Towards this end they would use the media and their reactionary columnists, editors, reporters and TV hosts to plant stories and write against Zardari for starters…They think once Zardari is gone, PPP will split and the elected govt will become impotent or it will be toppled and replaced by right wingers and fundoos (PML N, JI etc)….

Courtesy: – CRDP, Nov 10, 2009

GHQ attacked: Six soldiers, four assailants die

Gunmen attack Pakistani army HQ

By Augustine Anthony

Courtesy: Reuters

RAWALPINDI, Pakistan (Reuters) – Gunmen wearing army uniforms attacked the Pakistani army’s headquarters early on Saturday, killing six soldiers and taking several hostage after a gun battle, military officials said.

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Sindhis in Pak army

By: Khalid Hashmani

Mr. Azhar Ali Shah has extracted some interesting information about 14 Army chiefs of Pakistan (of course none of them was Sindhi) from Wikipedia. He has asked the knowledgeable persons to comment on the authenticity of the information since any one can add information to Wikipedia. He interestingly notes that except for one Army Chief, all other 13 chiefs superseded their seniors, denied the orders of head of state, seized the power though coup ….

Courtesy: Sindhi e-lists/ e-groups, 26 May 2009

 

Poor People in Resource Rich Sindh!

Khalid Hashmani

By: Khalid Hashmani, USA
About the author: Khalid Hashmani is a veteran human rights activist in Washington DC. He is the founding President of Sindhi Association of North America (SANA) and Chief coordinator of Sindhi Excellence Team (SET) that participates in advocacy activities on behalf of rural Sindhis. He can be reached at khashmani@hotmail.com
Rich with Oil and Gas but most backward area in Asia, the province of Sindh is the largest producer of oil and gas in Pakistan and yet it suffers one of the worst poverty levels in Asia. It produces 71 per cent of gas and 61 per cent of oil production in Pakistan. The daily production of oil and gas in Sindh is about 67,140 barrels and 3.99 billion cubic feet respectively. Yet most reports by organizations such as the World Bank call the rural areas of Sindh as most under-developed and deprived. A New York Times book review of a titled “A New Deal in Pakistan” by William Dalrymple (http://www.nybooks. com/articles/ 21194) says the following about Sindh:
“.. in fact, it is one of the most backward areas in all of Asia. Whatever index of development you choose to dwell on-literacy, health care provision, daily income, or numbers living below the poverty line-rural Sindh comes bumping along close to the bottom”.
Over-Centralization in Pakistan denies provincial rights
The plight of Sindh is due to over-centralization and exploitative policies of the central Pakistani government. The central government of Pakistan has usurped all revenue and income resources of the country including almost all forms of taxes and income earned from natural resources such as oil, gas, and coal.

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How long will Pakistan’s army chief sit on sidelines?

How long will Pakistan’s army chief sit on sidelines?
by Rick Westhead
March 19th, 2009
Courtesy and Thanks: Wichaar.com

NEW DELHI – Here’s what diplomats across much of the Western world know about Gen. Ashfaq Kayani, arguably Pakistan’s most important public figure: he’s a plain-talking and dour chain-smoker with a fondness for golf who started his military career in 1971 as a lowly infantryman. But this is what many are now anxious to find out about the reclusive 56-year-old: how long will he be content to sit on the sidelines, observing the uneasy peace agreed on this week between humbled Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari and opposition leader Nawaz Sharif, Zardari’s arch-nemesis?

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Madeleine Albright calls Pakistan “International Migraine”

Pakistan, an international migraine, says former US Secretary Madeleine Albright

WASHINGTON: Counting many elements, including terrorism and nuclear weapons, in Pakistan as causes of international worries, a former top US official has described the South Asian country as an “international migraine”. ( Watch )

“…my own sense is Pakistan has everything that gives you an international migraine. It has nuclear weapons, it has terrorism, extremists, corruption, very poor and it’s in a location that’s really, really important to us.

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Pakistan: Tales from the thinktank

Tales from the thinktank
A brilliant analysis of Pakistan incorporates past and present politics, says Mohammed Hanif
• Mohammed Hanif
• The Guardian,
• Saturday October 11 2008
In the introduction to his third book on Pakistan, Tariq Ali quotes a friend who asked if it wasn’t reckless to start a book about the country when the dice were still in the air. Ali’s reply: he would never have been able to write anything about Pakistan if he had waited for the dice to fall. Ali has had an uncanny record of foreseeing the way things are going. In his 1969 book Pakistan: Military Rule or People’s Power he foretold the imminent break-up of Pakistan, a shocking prediction at the time which came true within two years. In the 80s, Can Pakistan Survive? caused outrage within the Pakistani establishment, but two decades later, on the cover of every current affairs magazine and in every TV talk show, not only is Pakistan being branded the most dangerous place on earth but it has even been suggested that the world’s end is being planned there.

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