Tag Archives: Education

Sindh: A heart-twisting video Story of Thari and other Sindhi – A struggle for Water, Education, and Jobs

by Khalid Hashmani, McLean, Virginia, USA

Once again comes the heart-wrenching story about the plight of Tharis whose struggle for dignity and simple essentials of life continues unabated. This time, it is a video documentary produced by a Pakistani reporter named Kamran Shahid for a Television program. The video focuses on the daily struggle for for water, education, and jobs for this small Sindhi village and assails the uncaring attitude of politicians, particularly those of PPP. Many of Sindhis if they watch this video are likely to be impacted emotionally and strengthen their resolve to vigorously participate in the alleviation of their plight.

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO

The video shows the daily struggle of village men, women, and children to find drinkable water. It depicts animals and human beings drinking water from the same pond and the effort it takes to pull water from a deep well with the help of donkeys that must pull ropes for almost 100 yards. The broken Urdu that these broken people will convey the sense of helplessness that these people feel to communicate in broken Urdu that they hardly understand. They wish people who knew their own language would come to listen to their sorrows and have heart-to-heart chat about the misery that they suffer.

The reporter is taken to a a site where bare walls of a school that was supposed to start long time ago stand on an empty lot. The video shows disappointed and loitering kids roaming in streets without any where to go without a village school. The kids and their parents demand schools, education, and other opportunities to improve their livelihoods.

The reporter points to the border between India and Pakistan one mile away and asks the villagers if they knew how people lived in villages across the border. They reply immediately that the villagers on the other side have much better lives – they have piped dirking water, many tube-wells, and access to schools. The reporter comments that what is the fault of these people on this side of the border (Pakistan) that they should suffer so much and what makes the people living on other side of the border (India) to live better lives.

The reporter asks if the village has a dispensary or a medical clinic. The villagers reply that such they are not fortunate enough to have such a facility. They must carry their very sick relatives on carts to a hospital 30-40 miles away in the town of Umerkot. Many die sooner as the medical help cannot reach them on a timely basis.

I hope we will double our efforts to put pressure on Pakistani and international governments and institutions to come to rescue of poor Tharis and other Sindhis.

Via – http://pkpolitics.com/2010/03/20/front-line-20-march-2010/

Pen is mighter than sword!

Report by: Mukhtiar Mamo, Larkano

The pen has always empowered, educated and enlightened the people throughout the history but when in the hands of dictators and the notorious persons it has proved worst then sword and played havoc with the life of the nations. This was stated by the student speakers in speech competition on the topic “ Pen is mighter than sword” here held by Knowledge Centre Larkano on Sunday.

Continue reading Pen is mighter than sword!

SAARC nations : South Asian University

Quietly, a unique SAARC varsity takes shape

by: Anubhuti Vishnoi

Courtesy: IndianExpress, Jan 15, 2010

New Delhi:To reverse brain drain, provide an academic opportunity in the subcontinent and promote a sense of South Asian community, a plan first mooted in 2005 is finally and quietly taking shape — in the form of the first truly international university being set up by eight nations.

Tax-free dollar salaries for an international faculty, a variety of multi-disciplinary courses focused on research, a multinational exam for admission, an academic environment free of directions from Commissions, and a think tank to ponder over the shared problems of the subcontinent — these will be the key features of the South Asian University (SAU) being set up by SAARC nations.

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Issues of Sindh: SANA team’s meeting in Karachi

Report by: Zulfiqar Halepoto

On January 4th, 2010 (5.00 PM – 08.00 PM sharp) a team of Sindhi Association of North America (SANA) including president Dr Valeed Shaikh, Mazhar Lakho, Dr Maqbool Halepota, Dr Aijaz Turk, Sunny Panhwar, Sarfraz Abassi and some friends will be interacting with karachi based leading Sindhi intellectuals. Scholars, writers, development practitioners, educationists and journalists at TRDP , Clifton, Karachi.

Dr Sono Khangharani will give a detailed briefing on some ongoing programmes of development in Sindh through rural development perspective.

Leading thinkers Zamir Ghumro, Javed Kazi, Kazi Fazalluah, Zafar Junejo, Manzoor Chandio, Dodo Chandio, Masood Khan, Aijiz Jamali, G N Mughal, Shuhab Osto, Adam malik, Raheema panhwar, Zulfiqar Shah, Sikander Brohi, will take part in the discussion on the ‘development issues of Sindh’. This session will cover issues of development, political economy, poverty, education and other socio-economic and political issues of Sindh.

Students from Rural Sindh and Balochistan visit Washington DC under Pak-US Exchange Program

By Khalid Hashmani

Washington DC, November 2009 — Two separate batches of 26 female and 26 male high school (10th grade) students from the rural areas of Sindh, Balochistan, and FATA areas attended a two-week training in Northern Virginia, a suburb of Washington DC. The training was held during October and November of 2009. Their visit was made possible under a Pakistan-US Cultural program funded by US Aid.

Continue reading Students from Rural Sindh and Balochistan visit Washington DC under Pak-US Exchange Program

Critical analysis the behavior of Parents for Education of their Children

By Muhammad Haroon Bahlkani, Kashmore, Sindh

A Study Conducted in Low Literacy District Kashmore of Upper Sindh

Abstract – All parents want their children to learn. But the level of their desire and efforts vary because of different socio-cultural and economical factors. Parents’ educational level also influences their urge of making their children to learn. Therefore, the behavior and attitude of parents towards the education of their children varies accordingly. This study was conducted to identify the parents’ behavior towards the education of their children at secondary level.

Continue reading Critical analysis the behavior of Parents for Education of their Children

We are the Masters of our own fate

by Khalid Hashmani, McLean, Virginia, USA

.. Our Baloch brothers have chosen the armed path and seek separation. Only history will tell if this was the right decision by Balochs or a mistake that further takes Baloch children away from sharpening their pens and arming themselves with the educational assets. However, Sindhis are non-violent people who for much of their history avoided conflict and conquered the hearts of their conquers with love, humility, and Sindhiat. It is the beauty of Sindh that if Muslim Sindhis were lagging behind in education, the Hindu Sindhis opened the best schools and institutions in Sindh and gave the best opportunities to their children.

The greed, selfishness, and usurpation of collective resources is nothing but a temporary phenomenon. The be-raham wadera, corrupt politicians, and selfish bureaucrats and rich hoarders will be defeated if even few of us keep the light of Sindhiat alive. Those who can, must strive and do their best to bring positive revolution in small cities, towns, and villages of Sindh. Sooner or later, the sincere efforts of such people will succeed if not in this lifetime then in our children’s lifetime.

Let us use what ever we have to keep fighting for the positive change for we do not have any other alternative. To do nothing would mean surrendering without even trying!

Monitoring teaching of Sindhi in Sindh

by Khalid Hashmani, McLean, Virginia, USA

During an informal meeting with the Minister of Education for Sindh (Pir Mazhar-ul-Haq), the question of non-compliance of private schools to teach Sindhi in the schools of Sindh was also raised. The Minister confirmed that the teaching of Salees Sindhi and Salees Urdu are mandatory in the schools of Sindh. He also said that people should report any cases of non-compliance of this rule promptly and the Ministry will take appropriate action against them immediately. The Minister further said that if any one has verifiable reports that any school in Sindh is not teaching at the minimum of Salees Sindhi, they should either call him or or the Secretary of Education Sindh, MR. Rizwan Memon or they can also report via email to secy.edu@sindh.gov.pk. Let us see if the present Government is serious about ensuring that current laws of Sindh with respect to the use and teaching of the Sindhi language are enforced.

Those interested in monitoring and assessing the effectiveness of various education programs of the Sindh education ministry are advised to visit Ministry’s web site and share their views and critique. The Ministry URL is: http://www.sindh. gov.pk/dpt/ EducationFinal/ index.htm

Suggestions for Higher education (HEC) actions in Sindh

by Ali Nawaz Memon, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA

1. The discussion about admission policy in Karachi University in today’s paper. It appeared that the Education Minister made some statement and MQM MNA disagreed. Statement of the Karachi VC was non committal. I am not sure if any action will take place. WE NEED A CLEAR ADMISSION POLICY DECISION WITH TEETH WHICH WILL BE IMPLEMENTED BY A FIXED DATE.

2. The admission policy should APPLY TO OTHER PUBLICLY FUNDED UNIVERSITIES SUCH AS DOW MEDICAL, ENGINEERING ETC OF KARACHI.

3. The discussion about opening doors of universities in Punjab to Sindhis. However, we know that most Sindhis will not be able to go to study in Lahore, Multan, Faisalabad etc for financial and other reasons. Accordingly, THERE MUST BE FINANCIAL INCENTIVES TO ATTRACT SINDHI STUDENTS TO GO TO UNIVERSITIES IN PUNJAB. THIS IS CLEARLY NEEDED FOR SAKE OF NATIONAL INTEGRATION.

4. As far as I know, in rural Sindh we have only two general universities- – Sindh and Khairpur. The Khairpur one does not have a proper campus due to the unfortunate happenings at the Shadi shaheed campus. KHAIRPUR UNIVERSITY NEEDS A PROPER CAMPUS. FURTHER MORE, THE STANDARD OF KHAIRPUR MUST BE RAISED.

5. WE NEED ABOUT 3 MORE GENERAL UNIVERSITIES IN SINDH– ONE IN UPPER SINDH (E.G) GARHI KHAIR BUX/ LARKANA), ONE IN THAR (MIRPURKHAS/ SANGHAR/ MITTHI/ ISLAMKOT), AND ONE IN THE MIDDLE (NAWABSHAH/ BADIN).

Continue reading Suggestions for Higher education (HEC) actions in Sindh

Wikipedia Foundation receives grant of $500,000

San Francisco – The Wikimedia Foundation, the non-profit organization that operates the online encyclopedia Wikipedia, has received a $500,000 grant from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation to expand its work bringing free educational content to everyone on the planet. With this grant, the Hewlett Foundation acknowledges the important role Wikipedia and the other Wikipedia Foundation projects play in making educational information freely accessible. The grant to the Wikimedia Foundation is part of more than $100 million in grants since 2001 that the Hewlett has made to promote Open Education Resources around the world. The movement promotes the availability of high quality educational materials that anyone can use and edit for free.

Why are we in this state!?

Khalid Hashmani
Khalid Hashmani

by: Khalid Hashmani, McLean

August 12, 2009: The reason is simple! The natives of the provinces, where these resources are located, are denied their due share of benefits in Pakistan. Much of this wealth is enjoyed by people who either live in other provinces or people associated with powerful and high-maintenance organizations such as military. This leaves very little for common men and women, particularly those who live in rural areas.

Continue reading Why are we in this state!?

Bhit Shah, Sindh, has been selected to be in the first wave of this exciting new project

Blair launches new Global Schools Programme involving Pakisatni schools

Courtesy: Pak Tribune, Tuesday June 09, 2009

On 9th June, Tony Blair will launch a radically new global education programme, Face to Faith, that engages secondary school students of different faiths across the world in learning directly with, from and about each other – The City`s School in Bhit Shah, Sindh, has been selected to be in the first wave of this exciting new project involving schools in ten countries on four continents.

For full report, please click here

Continue reading Bhit Shah, Sindh, has been selected to be in the first wave of this exciting new project

Promote positive ideas

by Munwar Soomro, Washington DC, USA
The writer can be reached at soomro_munwar@yahoo.com
we should try to promote positive ideas and news. Negative ideas truly have made us hate ourselves. One should not go on the other extreme either where every thing looks great, We should talk and promote good things we have and those which we can do. In this regard I would say that when even our leaders are not helping us, there is great opportunity for us to rise and prove that we are  capable and that we don’t depend on the feudals.

Continue reading Promote positive ideas

Can we make the difference

By Ali Nawaz Memon

1) Can one man/woman make the difference? YES. HOWEVER, A LARGE, WELL ORGANIZED, ENERGETIC AND DEDICATED GROUP HAS A BETTER CHANCE OF SUCCESS. 2) If we were to take just one severe issue and try to improve which one it will/should be?

i) education ii) health iii) economy iv) bring up the moral values again v) or any other

ALL ARE IMPORTANT. I AM PERSONALLY GIVING HIGHER PRIORITY TO EDUCATION BECAUSE IT CAN TAKE INDIVIDUALS TO EMPLOYMENT AND PRODUCTIVE LIVES. IN TURN, THEY CAN HELP THEIR FAMILIES AND THE COMMUNITY.

3) Can we make a real difference from here or any place in the world or we ought to be on the real ground to get better and more effective results?

WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE FROM ANYWHERE. HOWEVER, PEOPLE ON THE SCENE HAVE TO PLAY THEIR PART.

Courtesy: Sindh e-lists/ e-groups.

April 27, 2008

Confucius

China and the Far East is influenced by Confucius. Confucius emphasizes the importance of eduction, but it is eduction that is anything but passive: he does not believe in any kind of schooling that involves just study. Yes, real study does involve finding a good teacher, imitating that person, listening to what he says and recommends. But equally important is reflecting on what one has learned. In other word: Confucius would disapprove of that modern student who does nothing but write down on a pad what his professor has said in a lecture. Instead, he recommends reflection. He says: “He who studies but does not also think is lost.” Education, then as we might say, is an interactive process. Confucius as well talks about “six arts,” or “six subjects,” that are important in education, but obviously regards morality (how we behave) as the most important subject for study.

Pakistan is legging behind in education than it’s neighbouring countries

Report by: Prof. Mukhtiar Ahmed Samo, Larkana, mukhtiarsamo@yahoo.com

“It is disappointing to note that our country is legging behind in education even from our neighbouring countries, which shows lukewarm response of our governments of all times to the education in the country. It is crucial to take measures for educating and safeguarding children because if we fail to ensure good education, and protection to the child today we can not expect stable, peaceful and prosperous society tomorrow because child is the foundation of the society. Firm foundation is essential for fortified building”. This was stated by the girl students while speaking in speech competition on ” Education to child is like water to crop” held here by Knowledge Centre Larkana. It was presided over by panel of educationists Nawab Ali Khokhar and Prof. Mukhtiar Ahmed Samo.

Continue reading Pakistan is legging behind in education than it’s neighbouring countries

Education strengthens democracy

– Mukhtiar Samo, Larkana

Knowledge Centre Larkana held an speech competition on ““Education strengthens democracy” which was presided over by Haji Munwar Ali Abassi, member provincial Assembly Sindh. Major(rtd) AbdulRehman Shaikh, principal SZABIST College Larkana was the Chief guest on the occasion.

The speakers on that occasion said that Tyranny always takes birth in the darkness of ignorance while the light of education gives birth to the democratic values which benefit the society hence it becomes fortified. The speakers further said that democracy with all its deficiencies and defects is yet better form of the government. Unfortunately it is very said to say that in Pakistan democracy has not been allowed to grow its roots deeply because of interference by anti-democratic elements and the low rate of literacy in the country. They further said that democracy ensure the protection of all basic rights of the people.

Speaking on the occasion Mr. Munawar Ali Abbasi said that educated society nourish democracy and only truly democratic governments could be able to address the grievances of the people and solve there problems. He further said quality education ensures many good things into the society strengthening democracy is one of them. He said that Shaheed Zulfkar Ali Bhutto was the first democratic leader who laid the foundation of the democracy in the country for first time in the history of the country. He eulogized the knowledge centre for involving the students in such intellectual discussions. Major (rtd) Abdul Rehman Sheikh said that practicing true democracy is also worship as it was last prophet of the God who set the example of true democracy by establishing a welfare state in the Madina. True democracy is the name of identifying ones responsibilities and fulfilling them so as to provide relief to the people. Prof. Mukhtiar Ahmed Samo honorary Director

of knowledge Centre said that Educational institutions should create democratic trends in their students which will result into generating tolerance and sense og fellow-feeling amongst the young people. He further said that Education enlightens the beholder and helps in electing the true and meritorious representation which becomes the base of the democracy. Among others who took participation in the competion included Shahnawaz leghari, Aqsa Ansari, Sheeraz Soomro, Mohammad Hassan Sohu. The 1st, 2nd and 3rd position waere won by Waqar ahmed leghari, Waqash Kumar and Mehran Zulfkar Sangi respectively.

July 31, 2008

Received via email

Educate Sindh

By Sohail Kalhoro

Firstly let me express my gratitude towards all for making ‘get to-gethers’ for Educate Sindh (ES) members such a friendly and encouraging platform. I would not be exaggerating when I say that these kinds of activities by our dedicated and participating members put my spirits high and itself are an encouragement to all members. Having said that, I would like to quote “The bitter and the sweet come from the outside, the hard from within, from one’s own efforts.” — Albert Einstein

In today’s world where concepts like technology, digital media, distant learning and Consumerism are a novelty, I believe it’s all about initiative determination and hard work. This is why we started this and working towards making it a healthy culture so that it becomes a platform for networking and we contribute to the betterment of our fellow brothers.

I sincerely believe that Mr. Safeeullah Soomro, Mr.Shah Muhammad Butt,Mr. Aijaz Ali Shah,Mr.Adnan Akbar Memon,Mr Gul Mastoi, Mr Nawal, Mr Tariq, Mr Mustaque Rajpar, Mr Saeed Rid, Mr Balach, Mr Munawar Rind, Mr Anwar Jogi, Mr Salam Dharejo, Mr Ali Nawaz Memon,Mr Niaz Nadeem Kandhar, Mr Ateeq Rehman Memon and other friends who have put an effort in making this networking a success deserve appreciation in whatever little or big contribution that could be made whether it is a valuable suggestion , advise, counseling, answering queries or being present at a get together. The concept and vision that we share for ES is making it larger than life through our combined efforts!

We all need to understand , that there is no commercial tail to this group, no revenue but lots of benefits & profits in the form of unity, knowledge and disseminating information.

In my opinion , those who made this get together a success the 43 people among us will now create “word of mouth” which would serve as 43 into 100=4300 people!!!! It is evident , look at the kind of correspondence an emails suggestions we already have! I would say this is quite commendable.

I have learnt in my past 8-9 years of professional and personal experience living in a different environment that the only way you are going to get anywhere in life is to work hard at it. Whether you’re a musician, a writer, an athlete or a businessman, there is no getting around it. If you do, you’ll win — if you don’t you wont.

Few suggestions in a nutshell are:

We develop these get to-gethers as a culture in order to boost this culture and share exposure and built a stronger network

This website and revolving emails itself is a database regulated and monitored which is why we don’t see spam or unnecessary interruptions

I would agree that there should be an agenda and of course the agenda always is the betterment and development of our people!!! So we keep it open for discussion unless there is something in particular that needs to be highlighted. We need to acknowledge a fact that we have members of different calibers and backgrounds some with certain beliefs and other with a different knowledgebase. That is precisely why we have started this culture to diversify and amalgamate this scattered force into one strong fist!

My dear friends keep up the effort and friends who corresponded and commented on the event thank you for the valuable input as it describes how it was and how we should chalk out our future activities.

July 30, 2008

Courtesy: Educate Sindh

29,035 schools in Sindh without power

by Prof. Gul Agha

It is great to see the govt. of Sindh focusing on these problems. Wish them luck to do what they can in whatever little time they have these ministries for, and with the meager resources that they can control.. the only hope is that a lot of international resources have been pouring in, particularly for education of Sindh but they have been mismanaged and lost to corruption…

Jun 25, 2008

Pakistan Survey

By Khalid Hashmani, McLean

… According to Dawn newspaper, people of Pakistan are realizing the setback that high expenditure in defense has caused to their education and other social needs. According to the newspaper article, a recent survey in Pakistan, 95% of respondents want cuts in the defense budget and 50% want that education and health be given top priority.

The full article can be read at: http://www.dawn.com/2008/06/02/nat3.htm

The survey was conducted by well-known NGO named SUNGI Foundation. The survey respondents also want the budget allocation to be on the basis of justice, equality, and democracy and feel that unnecessary ministries should be abolished.

I hope that the new government would consider these demands of people and initiate affirmative action programs in the rural areas of Pakistan.

June 02, 2008

What Sindhi Students should do?

By Munwar Soomro

…What we should do now? I think people have started realizing that self-help is the most important for us, and education is the base. Unfortunately we haven’t paid attention to getting quality education as much as we should have done. We have degrees but no qualification. Times are changing and the importance of quality education is getting the priority world over. This is no hidden truth that all nations who are developed are because of education….

May 17, 2008

Courtesy: Mehran

A 5 year plan for Primary Education and Adult Literacy

By Mohammad Ibrahim Joyo / Fakir Abdul Ghafoor Alasti

Courtesy: Daily Ibrat, May 7, 2008

[How to Achieve 100% Primary Education and 50% Adult Literacy for Rural Areas and Katchi Abadies of Sindh within 5 years And also to facilitate Access to Elementary Education (From Class VI to Class VIII) for all those who pass their 5 year primary and 2 year adult literacy exams from their village schools/centres in the rural areas and Katchi Abadies, of Sindh, by 2015.]

Our first plea, as an introduction to the proposal is:

The present day definition of literacy:

Anyone who could read and write with reasonable ease and do simple arithmetic with numbers, that is, passes 3Rs one of ‘Read’, one of ‘write’ and one of ‘arithmetic’ is considered to be literate, may he or she be a small baby or a Harvard University professor. The former is always innocent but not the later, who could also be maker of Atom Bomb and boast to be the president or prime minister of a country.

To us literacy is access to ‘knowledge’ and through it access to ‘humanity”. All sciences, formulas, QEDs bring knowledge to the seeker of objective truth, our request and appeal to him or her is “please Know Thyself,” as a human person.

After such a definition of literary. (Knowledge i.e. light of life, love and joy on earth), we proceed to the proposal for a viable access to it.

Where does our country stand now in its access to literacy? Fortunately for us, His Excellence the UNO Head here in our country – the chief of UNESCO answered this question to us and also for all our countrymen & women. It is reproduced in full text as reported in Dawn, dated April 20, 2008.

Pakistan’s literacy ratio still at 50pc: Unesco

By Bakhtawar Mian

ISLAMABAD, April 19: Literacy ratio in Pakistan still remains at 50 per cent, mainly because of small budgetary allocations, lack of political will and delays in disbursement of funds, according to the Unesco.

In the region, Pakistan has been ranked higher only than Nepal and Bangladesh, which have literacy rates of 49 and 43 per cent, respectively. Other countries have far better ratios: the Maldives, 96 per cent; Sri Lanka, 91 per cent; and India, 61 per cent.

Addressing a function organized by the Parliamentary Caucus on Literacy in Pakistan, Unesco’s representative Arshad Saeed Khan said there were about 55 million illiterate people in the country because of which the country risked failing to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

If corrective measures were not taken, the percentage of illiterates might even rise to 60 per cent of the population by 2010, he said.

Sindh has the highest percentage in education which stands at 54 per cent followed by Punjab (52 per cent) and the NWFP (40 per cent). Balochistan has the lowest ratio – 33 per cent.

The Unesco attributed the low level of literacy rate to factors like weak organizational infrastructure, low professional capacity, lack of research, non-availability of proper training institutes, low public awareness and lack of evaluation and monitoring system.

“The state shall be responsible for eradication of illiteracy and provision of free and compulsory education up to secondary level, within minimum possible time,” says article 37-B of the 1973 constitution.

Mr Arshad Saeed said that 16 political parties – including the PPP, PML-N, ANP, JUI-F and BNP (Awami), BNP (Mengal), Jamaat-i-Islami, Pakhtunkhwa Milli Awami Party and National Party – had signed Education For All Declaration on February 5, 2008 in which they had pledged to increase education budget up to 4 per cent of GDP, at least 10 per cent of the education budget for literacy and non-formal education, free and compulsory primary education – achieving 100 per cent enrolment rate, 86 per cent adult literacy by 2015, eradicate political interference and favouritism in appointments, transfers of education staff and uniform core curriculum and similar facilities in all schools.

Unesco stressed the need for legislation for free secondary education as a fundamental right, increasing education budget to 4 per cent of GDP, ensuring equal opportunities for all children because Pakistan has ratified Unesco Convention Against Discrimination in Education.

From the above it is clear that our Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as regards our education and literacy are now at higher risk if we do not shake up ourselves from our present national lethargy. Failing to do so, we may be branded in time as the most illiterate nation in the world. Thus it is the political will that is needed at the present juncture. So let us be sincere to read (“IQRA”). The Good written WORD! And involve ourselves one and all in EFA, i.e. the Education for All.

Having said this, we also note with a measure of joy the highest literary rate claimed for Sindh in the above report, among all federation units of Pakistan. But it is perhaps due to Karachi and other big cities in Sindh where combined literacy rate in these cities stands around 60%. The 40% Population living in katchi abadies and in the rural areas is still stark illiterate. Going by population formula, Karachi and the 3 other major urban cities viz. Hyderabad, Nawabshah & Sukkur compose 10 million literate, what about the rest of rural population of Sindh which is made up of 30 million including those living in katchi abadies and rural areas where literacy is at most 5%. So when we tally or balance the figures the overall situation of literacy in Sindh comes to 18.75% say 18%, 3 times lower than 54% what is said in the above report. That is the miracle of our bureaucrats of Pakistan. They are masters of figure fudging. They inflate or deflate these figures at will. As to poverty, one day they say it is 33% in Pakistan and next day 23%. Similarly all statistics of literacy are the legerdeomain at their hands: they enhance them without giving thought to the facts. The world knows that literacy and poverty are interrelated. If one increases other decreases. They are inversely proportional to each other. If they were to attend specifically to rural areas and katchi abadies of Sindh, they will find that 95% of the masses are illiterate. So we would ask his Excellency the Chief of UNESCO kindly to instruct his subordinate organizations of UN not to blind-foldedly follow figures supplied to them by our bureaucrats but go themselves to rural areas and katchi abadies and unregistered villages of Pakistan to conduct surveys on literacy i.e. the state of 3Rs, themselves. They will wonder to find that illiteracy and poverty are exactly the same, not 1% less, not 1% more! The illiteracy and poverty are one monster with two faces, those of ignorance and of indigence.

The factual state of education & literacy in Rural Sindh and its Katchi Abadies:

According to 1973 constitution of Pakistan, “The state shall be responsible for eradication of illiteracy and provision of free and compulsory education up to secondary level within a given minimum possible time” that goes on getting extended in time. About the functioning of the Primary schools, particularly the Sindhi medium ones, the less said the better. The life of many exists on paper but has no trace on ground. And what to tell of corruption in education all over Sindh from primary through elementary to secondary! There is no further room left for more of it.

Now the factual State of Poverty in Rural Sindh:

The quasi divide created by political interests between urban and rural Sindh presents the horrible look. Wherever you turn your eyes to see. If you will only come to Thatta from Karachi, after Ghagar Phatak (20 kms distance from Quaidabad) you will see indigenous people living in medieval ages. They residing in straw and indifferent abodes, their women old pitchers on their heads going by foot for miles in to get drinking water. All of them clothed in rags and barefeet. Their children and old people going to Karachi or to other towns TO BEG! One is ashamed seeing such differences created by this divide. On one side there is abundance and affluence only 20 kms away from the phatak and on the other indigence and poverty at its shamefulness. This state of poverty is more or less same in all rural areas of Sindh.

Now the lay-out of the PLAN to achieve 100% primary education and 50% Adult literacy within 5 years, affording access to Elementary education and near full adult literacy in rural areas and katchi abadies of Sindh, by 2015. And Measures to be taken under the direction, supervision and financial support of the present Government of Sindh to fight the two-face monster, poverty and ignorance, in one go:

Pre Primary, primary, elementary and secondary education:

The education be made compulsory and free from pre-primary to secondary level, and Government bear all educational expenditures of poor children of rural areas and katchi abadies in Sindh.

As incentive to bring all children up to 18 years under the cover of school education, to give stipend of Rs: 100/month/child of 3-5 ages, for preprimary education. Rs: 300/child/month of 6-10 years for attending primary education. Rs: 400/month/child of 11-14 years for continuing elementary education, and Rs: 500/month/child of 15-18 years for getting secondary education.

Government to provide premises for primary schools at every village and settlement at most 2 furlongs from it. The premises may even be of improvised material.

The schools for elementary and secondary education will be provided by Government for every 5000 and 10,000 populations respectively in every rural area.

The posts for recruiting teachers and staff for schools shall be immediately advertised and jobless educated youth appointed after due procedure on merit.

The education to be quality education, the teachers shall be given a six months training to start with by trained teachers (primary, middle, secondary and higher secondary) to be made free for the purpose of the six – month training of freshly appointed teachers.

Adult Literacy:

It will be compulsory too for all adults from 19 to any highest age the learner is desirous to enroll for it.

Each learner will be given Rs: 200/month as stipend (males and women both).

The literacy centres will be run in the same premises as for primary, elementary or secondary schools in evening time by the same teacher as posted in these schools with increased allowances.

The duration of these literacy centres will be 2 hours daily.

For males & females there shall be separate classes.

This type of education will be non formal and shall be each time for 2 months and executed through NGOs/CBOs. Separate syllabus shall be prepared for this type of education.

In all adult literacy centres, provisions for skill-training in local crafts be made for men and women entrants, who will be given micro-credits to pursue their skills as life profession to their choice.

Both those compulsory education programs, one for all children and adolescents up to 18 and the other for the literate adults from 19 years and above shall involve nearly all of rural areas and katchi abadies population. And if carried out through 5 years shall make us nearer to MDGs goals of 2015 and bring whole population of rural Sindh and its katchi Abadies at par with urban Sindh in eliminating the divide and promoting their progress as one people.

How to implement and administer both the program:

Both the programs primary through elementary to secondary and adult literacy be given directly with all their infrastructures, administrations, and staff to District Committee for implementation, each to be designated the District Basic Education and Poverty Alleviation Committee and be constituted from local education and literacy officers / Local Government representative / one umbrella NGO each – reputed for educational work in the district.

Monitoring and Evaluation:

There will also be a separate committee of local literary men and women and educationists of district to report directly to education minister on progress of the programs. Evaluation as to expenses be done by Auditors every 3 months sent by Education Minister.

Under the two programs, if started in like earnest and without losing any time, and carried out diligently, some 20 million adults, mainly daily wage earners and landless share croppers will be made literate in addition to almost equal number of the 5 years’ newborns of Sindh will have covered their 5 years primary education, literally amounting to reach the full literacy in Sindh approximately touching thus the MDGs goals by 2015.

It is to be understood that both of these programmes shall be conducted in and for the mother tongue – with Sindhi and Urdu to be introduced from class III respectively for Urdu and Sindhi children upto class V, and English is to be taught as a foreign language from class VI onwards.

It is also to be understood that the present Government of Sindh shall own up the subject of Education solely as the provincial subject at least upto higher secondary stage i.e. class XII in the first instance.

It is also to be remembered that nothing worthwhile in matter of Education as in any other sphere of development can be achieved in provinces without full measure of genuine political and fiscal autonomy.

Improve Education in Rural Sindh

By Khalid Hashmani, McLean, Virginia

About 12 days ago, the federal Education Ministry issued a policy draft containing several policy statements about the future Education Policy of Pakistan. I urge you to reject this draft and demand the changes recommended below. The rural areas of Sindh, Balochistan and FATA have poorest of poor educational facilities and opportunities and the people there are substantially lagging behind the rest of Pakistan.

The Ministry of Education of Government of Pakistan issued a draft of the National Education Policy on April 14, 2008. The draft available at http://www.moe. gov.pk/nepr/ new.pdf. Although the draft policy is comprehensive in many respects and clearly recognizes the inequities between rural and urban areas, it fails to mention that the conditions of educational facilities and opportunities in RURAL SINDH are as bad as in rural Balochistan and FATA. A synopsis of the key points from the draft is given at the end of this letter. The key points on the draft policy and suggested improvements are as follows:

1. The policy unfairly and irrationally pushes for centralization of Pakistan’s educational system. The centralization is one of the main reasons that has kept Pakistan from progressing. The over centralization has resulted in various forms of discrimination that the draft policy has itself recognized. However, the draft policy wrongfully says that modern states have one national education system. In fact, in most modern and progressing countries (including USA, India, Canada, etc.), the federal governments simply creates some high-level guidelines, national standards and assessments systems but otherwise the matter of education is considered totally a provincial subject. This is the reason that constitution of Pakistan emphasizes gives the responsibility of education to the provinces. Unfortunately, the over-zealous proponents of the centralization have succeeded in continuing the “education” to be largely a federally controlled subject. But, we all know that the days of concurrent list are likely to end soon. The education policy makers must realize this reality and make changes to the policy to comply with the new era of decentralization.

2. The draft policy claims that new National Educational Policy supports the reflection of the local cultural contexts through curricula, etc. It forgets that only educational system that is run by provinces can truly reflect the real cultural context of their provinces.

3. The draft policy lumps all regional dialects and languages into one category. The education policy must recognize that the Sindhi language is the historical language of Sindh. Unlike other provinces, Sindhi has been used as the main medium of instruction for more than a century. The education policies must be amended to ensure that this historical role of the Sindhi language is preserved for generations to come.

4. The federation of Pakistan is composed of four (4) federating units with their distinct history and heritage. The draft policy does not recognize this important fact. Relevant policy changes must be made so that students are not only taught the modern history of Pakistan but they are also taught about their province’s distinct history and heritage.

5. The report distinctly refers to the “Federal” government but lumps provincial governments and other local governments under one phrase “Provincial/Area Governments” . The education policy makers must realize that during these times when the need for “provincial autonomy” has become the cry of almost all Pakistanis and because “education” is a provincial subject, such references in policy recommendations be changed to recognize the prominent role of provincial governments in meeting the educational objectives of Pakistan. The policy draft should recommend that jurisdiction between the local areas located in a province is to set by the provincial governments and the federal government must not interfere in such matters.

6. A policy action must include a provision that starting next year, additional 0.5% of GDP will be spent on improving education facilities in rural Sindh, rural Balochistan, and FATA areas until the the educational facilities and opportunities in those areas are brought to be apar with rest of Pakistan.

7. A policy recommendation must be made to allow provincial governments to negotiate foreign assistance for improving education facilities for their provinces.

8. The federal role in education should be limited to creating high-level guidelines, setting of national quality standards, and establishing assessment tests. The federal government must not interfere more than that in the education matters and let the provincial government meet their responsibility in education sector as the founding fathers had envisioned. There is no need for Inter-Provincial Education Ministers’ (IPEM) Conference to be used as a tool to deny further provincial autonomy.

I hope you will also take time to read this policy draft, whose aim appears to be to further the yoke of centralization on the federating units of Pakistan.

You probably receive several appeals each year to make a donation to an individual school, project, or scholarship. You probably always wished that you had a lot of money to give scholarships to one or more poor students in rural Sindh. Most likely you could not respond to each and every appeal as you could not afford it. However, this is your opportunity to do something extra-ordinarily important for the cause of education in rural Sindh. It will take only few minutes of your time to send few emails to the right people, but your action could result billions of additional funding for education in rural Sindh.

Please write letters or send emails to high officials of the federal and provincial governments and as well other leaders of PPP, PML-N, and other political parties and ask them to get the suggested improvements incorporated in the Education Policy. In addition go to the web site of Pakistan Fedral Education Ministry (http://www.moe. gov.pk/) and submit your comments and suggestions for improvement by clicking the “Contact Us” button.

I tried my best to get e-mail addresses of current Ministers, Prime Minister, Education Minister, and members of two chambers of Pakistani Parliament on the web site of the federal government (http://www.pakistan .gov.pk/). However, it appears that the officials of the new government are shy about listing their e-mail addresses. Only the following two women members of Parliament had listed their e-mail addresses:

PPP — Ms. Fauzia Wahab fawahab@orientale. com

PML-Q — Mr. Riaz Fatiana riazfatyana@ hotmail.com

————

SYNPOSIS FROM THE DRAFT EDUCATION POLICY REPORT

——— ——-

MAJOR CONCERNS EXPRESSED IN THE DRAFT EDUCATION POLICY

——— ———

The draft policy rightfully points out the following major concerns:

1. The current Pakistani policy framework has not served as a satisfactory guide and has not generated desired results in the context of access rates, quality and equity in educational opportunities.

2. The current policy will fail as the new challenges triggered by globalization and Pakistan’s desire to become a “knowledge society” are faced.

3. Although Gross Enrollment Ratio, at the primary level has improved, the achieved 66% rate is below the target rate of 79% for 2005-06. One-third of primary school age and three-quarters of the secondary school age children remain out of school. THE DRAFT SAYS, “CLEARLY, PAKISTAN IS SOME DISTANCE AWAY FROM ACHIEVING UNIVERSAL SCHOOLING, EVEN AT THE PRIMARY LEVEL”.

4. Pakistan performance on enrollments lacks behind both in the context of education and literacy rates. PAKISTAN’S LITERACY RATES (49.9%) IS LOWER THAN FOR COUNTRIES LIKE INDIA (61%), IRAN (82.4%), and SRI LANKA (90.7%).

5. The low access primarily results from lack of confidence in the public sector schools due to POLITICAL INTERFERFERENCE AND CORRUPTION THAT HAS PREMEATED THE ENTIRE SECTOR. RECRUITMENTS, TRANSFERS and POSTINGS ARE POLITICALLY DRIVEN CAUSING THE ISSUES OF ABSENTEE TEACHERS, GHOST SCHOOLS AND CHEATING IN EXAMINATIONS.

6. There is a large difference in ACCESS ACROSS GENDER, ETHNIC MINORITIES, PROVINCES, REGIONS, and RURAL-URBAN DIVIDE.

7. It is common knowledge and proven by many studies that DISCRIMINATION EXISTS IN EDUCATION SYSTEM IN VARIOUS FORMS. This inequity is the result of poor implementation and social customs.

8. The girls continue to face SIGNIFICANT DISADVANTAGES IN ACCESS AS THEY REACH ADULTHOOD. THE FEMALES ARE PARTICULARLY UNDER REPRESENTED IN RURAL AREAS.

9. The RURAL DISADVANTAGE AT THE SECONDARY LEVEL IS RATHER LARGE (48% URBAN vs. 22% RURAL). THE PRECENTAGE GAP BETWEEN URBAN AND RURAL AREAS HAS WIDENED 20 POINTS IN 2001-02 to 2005-06. The SURVIVAL RATE TO GRADE 5 IS 67% in RURAL AREAS VS. 94% IN URBAN AREAS. THE PUPIL TEACHER RATIO IS 12 PUPILS PER TEACHER IN URBAN AREAS VS. 18 PUPILS PER TEACHER IN RURAL AREAS. WHILE 90% OF URBAN SCHOOLS HAS WATER SOURCES, ONLY 63% RURAL SCHOOLS DO SO. WHERE AS, URBAN SCHOOLS HAVE 88% SANITATION FACILITIES VS. 56% SCHOOLS HAVE SIMILAR FACILITIES IN OF RURAL AREAS.

10. The study says that PUNJAB and SINDH are leading are at the top of league, however, as usual poor BALOCHISTAN IS LAGGING FAR BEHIND with the following percentages:

Primary School Net Enrolment Ratio (NER)

— Punjab 68%

— Sindh 67%

— NWFP 66%

— Balochistan 40%

Secondary School Net Enrolment Ratio (NER) – Punjab (26%) vs. 11% for Balochistan and FATA.

The Literacy rate for adults is 55% in Sindh vs. 37% in Balochistan.

11. An international comparison confirms the relative POOR QUALITY of Pakistan’s education. The National Education Assessment System (NEAS) 2005 scores of Pakistani students are well below many other countries.

12. Only about 47% of teaching staff had the required teaching qualifications.

DRAFT POLICY ON FUNDING SOURCES FOR EDUCATION IN PAKISTAN

——— —

1. In 2005-6, the governments funding amounted to about 2.5% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on education. A further 0.5% is estimated to be the contribution of the private sector for 3% of GDP. It is slight improvement from 2000-01 when it was 2.2%.

2. Pakistan spends relatively LESS on education (2.3%) than countries like Iran (4.7%), Malaysia (6.2%), India (3.8%), and Bangladesh (2.5%).

MAJOR DRAFT POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

———— –

The draft policy recommendations in numerous areas including:

1. Provinces and local areas to affirm the goal of achieving universal and free primary education by 2015 and up to class 10 by 2025.

2. The Government shall commit to allocating 7% of GDP to education by 2015.

3. The federal and Provincial/Area Governments shall develop consensus on needs and priorities for foreign assistance in education.

4. The federal role shall be facilitator and coordinator. The federal government will be responsible for National Education policy. The Inter-Provincial Education Ministers’ (IPEM) Conference will have the jurisdiction over reviewing progress and implementation.

2008 Education Policy- Rural-Urban Gap

By Khalid Hashmani, McLean, Virginia

Last week, the federal Education Ministry issued a policy draft containing several policy statements about the future Education Policy of Pakistan. I urge the Peoples’ Party of Pakistan (PPP) to reject this draft and appoint a commission composed of representatives from all provinces, ensuring that true representation from rural Sindh, Balochistan, and FATA. These three regions have poorest of poor educational facilities and opportunities and the people there are substantially lagging behind the rest of Pakistan.

The Ministry of Education of Government of Pakistan issued a draft of the National Education Policy on April 14, 2008. The draft available at http://www.moe. gov.pk/nepr/ new.pdf. Although the draft policy is comprehensive in many respects and clearly recognizes the inequities between rural and urban areas, it fails to mention that the conditions of educational facilities and opportunities in RURAL SINDH are as bad as in rural Balochistan and FATA. A synopsis of the key points from the draft is given at the end of this letter. My arguments for asking PPP to reject the draft policy are as follows:

1. The policy unfairly and irrationally pushes for centralization of Pakistan’s educational system. The centralization is one of the main reasons that has kept Pakistan from progressing. The over centralization has resulted in various forms of discrimination that the draft policy has itself recognized. However, the draft policy wrongfully says that modern states have one national education system. In fact, in most modern and progressing countries (including USA, India, Canada, etc.), the federal governments simply create some high-level guidelines, national standards and assessments systems but otherwise the matter of education is considered totally a provincial subject. This is the reason that constitution of Pakistan emphasizes gives the responsibility of education to the provinces. Unfortunately, the over-zealous proponents of the centralization have succeeded in continuing the “education” to be largely a federally controlled subject. But, we all know that the days of concurrent list are likely to end soon. The education policy makers must realize this reality and make changes to the policy to comply with the new era of decentralization.

2. The draft policy claims that new National Educational Policy supports the reflection of the local cultural contexts through curricula, etc. It forgets that only educational system that is run by provinces can truly reflect the real cultural context of their provinces.

3. The draft policy lumps all regional dialects and languages into one category. The education policy must recognize that the Sindhi language is the historical language of Sindh. Unlike other provinces, Sindhi has been used as the main medium of instruction for more than a century. The education policies must be amended to ensure that this historical role of the Sindhi language is preserved for generations to come.

4. The federation of Pakistan is composed of four (4) federating units with their distinct history and heritage. The draft policy does not recognize this important fact. Relevant policy changes must be made so that students are not only taught the modern history of Pakistan but they are also taught about their province’s distinct history and heritage.

5. The report distinctly refers to the “Federal” government but lumps provincial governments and other local governments under one phrase “Provincial/Area Governments” . The education policy makers must realize that during these times when the need for “provincial autonomy” has become the cry of almost all Pakistanis and because “education” is a provincial subject, such references in policy recommendations be changed to recognize the prominent role of provincial governments in meeting the educational objectives of Pakistan. The policy draft should recommend that jurisdiction between the local areas located in a province is to set by the provincial governments and the federal government must not interfere in such matters.

6. A policy action must include a provision that starting next year, additional 0.5% of GDP will be spent on improving education facilities in rural Sindh, rural Balochistan, and FATA areas until the the educational facilities and opportunities in those areas are brought to be apar with rest of Pakistan.

7. A policy recommendation must be made to allow provincial governments to negotiate foreign assistance for improving education facilities for their provinces.

8. The federal role in education should be limited to creating high-level guidelines, setting of national quality standards, and establishing assessment tests. The federal government must not interfere more than that in the education matters and let the provincial government meet their responsibility in education sector as the founding fathers had envisioned. There is no need for Inter-Provincial Education Ministers’ (IPEM) Conference to be used as a tool to deny further provincial autonomy.

I hope some of you will also take time to read this dreadful policy draft, whose aim seems to be to further the yoke of centralization on federating units.

I look forward to hearing soon that PPP will create a new education commission to create guidelines that will empower provinces to improve education in their provinces and allocate substantial funding towards bringing educational equity between urban and rural areas of their province.

——— ——

SYNPOSIS FROM THE DRAFT POLICY REPORT

—– ——— —

MAJOR CONCERNS ON EDUCATION EXPRESSED IN DRAFT POLICY

——— ———

The draft policy rightfully points out the following major concerns:

1. The current Pakistani policy framework has not served as a satisfactory guide and has not generated desired results in the context of access rates, quality and equity in educational opportunities.

2. The current policy will fail as the new challenges triggered by globalization and Pakistan’s desire to become a “knowledge society” are faced.

3. Although Gross Enrollment Ratio, at the primary level has improved, the achieved 66% rate is below the target rate of 79% for 2005-06. One-third of primary school age and three-quarters of the secondary school age children remain out of school. THE DRAFT SAYS, “CLEARLY, PAKISTAN IS SOME DISTANCE AWAY FROM ACHIEVING UNIVERSAL SCHOOLING, EVEN AT THE PRIMARY LEVEL”.

4. Pakistan performance on enrollments lacks behind both in the context of education and literacy rates. PAKISTAN’S LITERACY RATES (49.9%) IS LOWER THAN FOR COUNTRIES LIKE INDIA (61%), IRAN (82.4%), and SRI LANKA (90.7%).

5. The low access primarily results from lack of confidence in the public sector schools due to POLITICAL INTERFERFERENCE AND CORRUPTION THAT HAS PREMEATED THE ENTIRE SECTOR. RECRUITMENTS, TRANSFERS and POSTINGS ARE POLITICALLY DRIVEN CAUSING THE ISSUES OF ABSENTEE TEACHERS, GHOST SCHOOLS AND CHEATING IN EXAMINATIONS.

6. There is a large difference in ACCESS ACROSS GENDER, ETHNIC MINORITIES, PROVINCES, REGIONS, and RURAL-URBAN DIVIDE.

7. It is common knowledge and proven by many studies that DISCRIMINATION EXISTS IN EDUCATION SYSTEM IN VARIOUS FORMS. This inequity is the result of poor implementation and social customs.

8. The girls continue to face SIGNIFICANT DISADVANTAGES IN ACCESS AS THEY REACH ADULTHOOD. THE FEMALES ARE PARTICULARLY UNDER REPRESENTED IN RURAL AREAS.

9. The RURAL DISADVANTAGE AT THE SECONDARY LEVEL IS RATHER LARGE (48% URBAN vs. 22% RURAL). THE PRECENTAGE GAP BETWEEN URBAN AND RURAL AREAS HAS WIDENED 20 POINTS IN 2001-02 to 2005-06. The SURVIVAL RATE TO GRADE 5 IS 67% in RURAL AREAS VS. 94% IN URBAN AREAS. THE PUPIL TEACHER RATIO IS 12 PUPILS PER TEACHER IN URBAN AREAS VS. 18 PUPILS PER TEACHER IN RURAL AREAS. WHILE 90% OF URBAN SCHOOLS HAS WATER SOURCES, ONLY 63% RURAL SCHOOLS DO SO. WHERE AS, URBAN SCHOOLS HAVE 88% SANITATION FACILITIES VS. 56% SCHOOLS HAVE SIMILAR FACILITIES IN OF RURAL AREAS.

10. The study says that PUNJAB and SINDH are leading are at the top of league, however, as usual poor BALOCHISTAN IS LAGGING FAR BEHIND with the following percentages:

Primary School Net Enrolment Ratio (NER)

— Punjab 68%

— Sindh 67%

— NWFP 66%

— Balochistan 40%

Secondary School Net Enrolment Ratio (NER) – Punjab (26%) vs. 11% for Balochistan and FATA.

The Literacy rate for adults is 55% in Sindh vs. 37% in Balochistan.

11. An international comparison confirms the relative POOR QUALITY of Pakistan’s education. The National Education Assessment System (NEAS) 2005 scores of Pakistani students are well below many other countries.

12. Only about 47% of teaching staff had the required teaching qualifications.

DRAFT POLICY ON FUNDING SOURCES FOR EDUCATION IN PAKISTAN

——— ——— —

1. In 2005-6, the governments funding amounted to about 2.5% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on education. A further 0.5% is estimated to be the contribution of the private sector for 3% of GDP. It is slight improvement from 2000-01 when it was 2.2%.

2. Pakistan spends relatively LESS on education (2.3%) than countries like Iran (4.7%), Malaysia (6.2%), India (3.8%), and Bangladesh (2.5%).

MAJOR DRAFT POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

——— ——— ——— –

The draft policy recommendations in numerous areas including:

1. Provinces and local areas to affirm the goal of achieving universal and free primary education by 2015 and up to class 10 by 2025.

2. The Government shall commit to allocating 7% of GDP to education by 2015.

3. The federal and Provincial/Area Governments shall develop consensus on needs and priorities for foreign assistance in education.

4. The federal role shall be facilitator and coordinator. The federal government will be responsible for National Education policy. The Inter-Provincial Education Ministers’ (IPEM) Conference will have the jurisdiction over reviewing progress and implementation.

April 23, 2008

Courtesy: Sindhi e-lists/ e-groups,

Scholarships for higher studies in South Korean Universities

All of those who have passed Bachelor’s/Master’s course and now wishing to continue your studies further in MS /PhD course then please come forward, South Korean universities are waiting for you.

As South Korean high-tech research institutes and universities are now emerging with the implementation of latest and advanced technologies. An imaginative research work is going on rapidly for becoming future’s hub of engineering research and technologies. It is now policy of all the high-tech research institutes, Universities along with the Government to increase the number of foreign students. Many students from Punjab and NWFP have tried to search those institutes/universities for getting scholarships and they succeed and now they are studying here with the total support of universities but unfortunately no one from Sindh has tried to avail these opportunities.

This is my request indeed I emphasize that Please search universities, appropriate Labs and forward your documents along with resume and research proposal to the concerned professors and If you were accepted by professor then write to universities international cooperation offices or professor to bear your living expenses along with tuition and dormitory fees in shape of scholarship or any other package. I am sure if you guys seriously and sincerely tried you will definitely avail that chance.

Courtesy:  Sindhi e-lists/e-groups, March 09, 2008

Educate Sindh Forum Organized a get Together in London

The New Ray of Light : Young Sindhi Leadership is rising

– Sohail Kalhoro

Educate Sindh forum organized a get together dinner at my residence in London on the evening of 15th Sept 07 which presented an opportunity for many SINDHI PROFESSIONALS to personally come together and participate in a vibrant evening which saw friends with diverse backgrounds ranging from: Information Technology, Law, Medicine, Chartered Accounting, Satellite Communication, Business Administration, Environmental studies, Civil, Electrical, and Telecoms Engineering.

Sincere thanks to all friends who took time out of their busy weekends and joined us from London, Slough, Bristol, Birmingham,Surrey as well as Pakistan. Group members started arriving 17:00 onwards on a warm London evening. The event started with an informal introduction of the participants and their respective professional fields. Dinner was served following which an interactive suggestions/recommendations session was initiated focusing on;

1) AIMS/OBJECTIVES: Responding to a query by a member it was informed that the objective of EducateSindh is to channel the resources and capacity of the SINDHI PROFESSIONALS in the field of education, employment opportunities, and career counselling.

2) TARGET AUDIENCE: Again, in response to another question put up by a friend regarding who the target audience is which would be benefited from the services provided by this group.It was elaborated that the group’s expertise and resources is not confined to a single segment and in order to maximize the benefits of the participation of SINDHI PROFESSIONALS as many audience should be catered to.

3) EDUCATESINDH STRUCTURE: It was informed that the credibility and success of EducateSindh is due to the fact that it is an open forum, having no hierarchical boundaries which makes it an inclusive and participative platform for all.

4) ORGANIC GROWTHIt was unanimously agreed that the benefits of this group should be extended to wider community audience and thus the participants agreed to share their contacts by providing a minimum of 5 to 10 new members and thus helping this forum to grow organically. In this regard it is down to the responsibility to each individual of this group to similarly help add new members.

5) EMAIL AS AN EFFECTIVE MODE OF COMMUNICATION It was emphasized that exchanging emails should be made a habit as it provides the most efficient and productive means of communicating as well as encouraging friends and social contacts to stay in touch over this medium. QUICK, EASY & EFFECTIVE.

6) “SINDHI PROFESSIONALS” AS A BRAND The essence of this group is the participation of highly motivated, qualified & enthusiastic Sindhis and this should be made the unique selling point (USP) of our endeavours hence the association with the brand “SINDHI PROFESSIONALS”. Furthermore, it is a step forward in helping relate the common link between sindhis world over.

7) SHARING EXPERIENCESEducateSindh provides a flexible & friendly platform to SINDHI PROFESSIONALS where they could share their practical experiences not just limited to the exchange of emails but also by actually personally talking to the local community including schools, colleges, universities which would benefit the most from the sharing of these experiences.

Each one of us can contribute by sharing whatever little experience we have gained whether it is just by visiting Sindh, Khairpur, Nawabshah & other Universities and talking to a handful of students and guiding them on the spot about their path to being qualified & successful in their respective fields or even just visiting our own primary/secondary schools in villages and talking to the teachers and headmasters. This trend should be encouraged as it will maximize each of our individual capacity to help. The idea here is to not limit ourselves to large gatherings or wait for such opportunities but to utilize whatever little time we have at our hands to broaden the horizon of many.

The get together which went on until around 22:30 was concluded with an aim to further continue holding these interactive get togethers extending to different geographical and wider audience which began with the successful meeting of SINDHI PROFESSIONALS in Karachi on the 12th Sept 07 following onto 15th Sept London dinner with a view to organize a seminar in sindh after Eid.

Special thanks to our friends who attended last night’s dinner. Abdullah Abbasi, Ahmed Kamran, Amar Jalil Metlo, Asad Palijo, Ashraf Lakho, Dr Ali Gul Metlo, Dr Shoaib Qazi, Gul Laghari, Haleem Junejo, Hassan Junaid, Imran Mahar, Imran Soomro, Junaid Ahmed Narejo, Khalid Jamali, Manzoor Unar, Mohammad Ali Shaikh, Mujeeb Metlo, Razzak Solangi, Roop Panjwani, Saboor Mahar, Saeed Soomro, Shabbir Mallah.

News courtesy: Sindhi e-lists/ e-groups,