Tag Archives: cultural

International Sindhi Cultural & solidarity Day- Houston

International Sindhi cultural, Heritage and solidarity day celebrated in Toronto, Houston Texas, Washington, New York, London and Saint Louis by Sindhi Association of North America (SANA) and World Sindhi Congress (WSC).

Around one hundred Sindhi living in Houston gathered and enjoyed a colorful and cold evening. Majority was dressed in Sindhi cultural Ajrak and Topi and enjoyed Sindhi music.

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Every consciousness is indeed incomplete without political consciousness.

“Political Gene” – Jameel Hussain Junejo.

Every consciousness is indeed incomplete without political consciousness. A man of cultural, social, and economic consciousness can not, without political consciousness, accurately comprehend the genuine problems of his or her nation and offer rights solutions. Political consciousness among the masses is equivalent to backbone of mainly oppressed and enslaved nations.

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Sindh cultural unity

Sindhi cultural unity days —Nizamuddin Nizamani

Sindh volunteered to be the part of Pakistan and the Sindh Assembly took the first initiative to pass a resolution in favour of Pakistan. The incoming ruling elite of newly established Pakistan behaved contrary to the commitments and instead deprived the province of the privileges enjoyed even before independence

Sindh is celebrating culture days on December 4 and 5, 2010 to revitalise and revamp the Sindhi cultural symbols and way of life presumed to be under threat from the so-called external encroachment and the risk of extinction.

According to anthropologists, culture refers to the cumulative deposit of knowledge, experience, beliefs, values, attitudes, meanings, hierarchies, religion, notions of time, roles, spatial relations, concepts of the universe, and material objects and possessions acquired by a group of people in the course of generations through individual and group striving.

Sindh and the Sindhi language have a rich cultural heritage and have acquired many symbols from other cultures, eastern and western simultaneously, without compromising their basic formation. Historically, the Sindhi language was among the few recognised official languages in undivided India under British rule. The Sindhi vernacular has rich expressional potential catering to all aspects of socio-economic and administration systems, has written and oral capacity, symbols and phonics about all tangible and intangible things, emotions, feelings, norms, has a versatile and comprehensive vocabulary with many words for the same items in varying degrees and having multiple meanings for the same words.

The content and quality of the dialect, according to Tariq Rehman, impressed the British government. The Bombay government adopted Sindhi as the official language at the local level and in September 1851 made it mandatory for British officials to pass a Sindhi language exam as a prerequisite to qualify for a job in the administrative system of Sindh. The administration also took supportive steps to modify, simplify and enhance the Sindhi language by redesigning Sindhi letters into Arabic letters and increased the number of alphabets to 52 to cover all the sounds.

Tariq Rehman also provides that Sindhi remained a major language of basic schooling in the province. Sindhi intellectuals, researchers and critics argue that though Sindh volunteered to be a part of Pakistan and the Sindh Assembly took the first initiative to pass a resolution in favour of Pakistan, the incoming ruling elite of newly established Pakistan behaved contrary to the commitments and instead deprived the province of the privileges enjoyed even before independence.

In such a backdrop since partition, Sindhi culture has been on the defensive. Sindhi nationalists observe that since independence the state has been imposing Mughal and Arabic culture in the name of a single Pakistani identity at the cost of other cultures. ….

Read more : Daily Times

Sindhi Cultural and Solidarity Day in Calgary

Sindhi Cultural and Solidarity day is being celebrated throughout the world on 4th and 5th December. We welcome this initiative and would like to participate to offer our humble service to strengthen peaceful voice of Sindhi culture.

Wearing or displaying any symbol and artifact of Sindhi Culture will enhance the spirit of the day. Some community members have shown interest and arranging Sindhi cultural artifacts and they will be displayed in the Hall, you are also invited to wear or bring in Sindhi cultural materials of your choice to celebrate the day. Refreshment will be served

Venue: PCA HALL 507-4656, West Wind Drive NE, AB T3J 3Z5, Date/Time: December 5th 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM. RSVP – Mazhar Memon, Asim Kaghzi, Sanjay Panjwani, Asif Panhwar.

US Consulate Karachi celebrates Sindh Cultural Day 2010

William Martin

Consul General Karachi William Martin supports Sindh Cultural Day, December 4th, 2010. Honorable William Martin delivers a message for the occasion & even he can speak in Sindhi. Ms. Andie of U.S. Consulate is also a great woman. She has great regards for Sindh & Sindhi language. She learned Sindhi language during her posting in Karachi like she knew Bhasha Indonesia.

The history of Ajrak goes back to 5000 years.. It had been used by King priest, the symbol of Indus valley Civilization. The people of Sindh are the Guardian of the culture,the customs and the rituals of Sindhu-Sarswati (Indus) civilization.

International Sindhi Cultural Day, New York, Saturday December 4th, 2010

New York : Please join Tri-State Sindhi Community in celebrating International Sindhi Cultural & Solidarity Day. On this day, Sindhi people cherish their multiculturalism, universalism, tolerance, peace and respect for all faiths. Please wear Sindhi Topi (Sindhi Cap) and Ajrak (Sindhi Shawl). Event includes Sindhi Soul Music concert, dinner, poetry and cultural demonstrations. Gop Chander and Saathi will Sing Sufi (mystic) Kalaams. Venue: Kabab King Mehal, 495 Hempstead Tpke W Hempstead, NY 11552. Saturday, December 4th, 2010, 7:00 pm – 1:00 am. Please RSVP: Ghulam Nabi Unar, Khalid Channa, Farhan Kaghzi and Dr Noor Rajpar.

 

Sindhi Cultural Day in Washington on December 4, 2010

Washington: Many organizations and media in Sindh have decided to celebrate Unity and Sindhi Cultural Day in Sindh. Let us show our solidarity with our kith and kin in Sindh by celebrating this day on Saturday, December 4, 2010. Please join Iqbal Tareen, the President of Silver Lining International, Inc. and the author of “Harvest will come”  in McLean, Virginia at 6:00 PM. If possible, please dress in our national outfit for this unique occasion. Complimentary pizza of your choice and light beverages will be served. Please feel free to bring food and beverages of your choice if your heart desires but it is not mandatory. There is plenty of guest parking. Here is our address for event: 1910 Holly Ridge Drive, # T2, McLean, VA 22102.

Courtesy:  Sindhi e-lists/ e-groups.

International Sindhi Cultural & Solidarity Day

Toronto : Join Toronto Sindhi Community in celebrating, International Sindhi Cultural & Solidarity Day. Venue: @Party Hall, 85 Thorncliffe Park Drive, East York, Toronto, ON. Major intersection: Don Mills Rd & Eglinton Ave East. Sunday, December 5th, 2010, 3:00 pm to 7:00 pm. Participate wearing Sindhi Ajrak and Topi. Every year millions of Sindhis around the world celebrate their rich culture and heritage on Saturday and Sunday, the first week of December . Sindh is the land of centuries old civilization, Indus Civilization which promotes peace, respect, communal harmony, liberalism, tolerance, diversity, multiculturalism and sufism. Coffee and Dinner will be served. Please RSVP by Friday December 3rd, 2010: Aijaz Shaikh, Siraj Makhdoom, Rasheed Jatoi.

Indo-Pak Youth Festival for Peace: LAHORE FEB 2011

– “Peace cannot be kept by force. It can only be achieved by understanding” – Albert Einstein.

Youth make- up one fifth of the South- Asian demography. Most often we see youth as victims or perpetrators of violence. History is witness to the fact that youth as members of an ever changing, dynamic and energetic group in societies play a crucial role in transforming conflict ridden societies into democratic and peaceful societies. This is a critical mass which needs to be involved when it comes to transformation of violent relationships, structures, attitudes and behaviors towards peace building.

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The 2010 Commonwealth Games – A Systemic Indicator of India’s Democracy

by Koustubh Parulekar

The 2010 Commonwealth Games, hosted in Delhi this October 3-14, are touted to be India’s answer to Beijing’s 2008 Olympic extravaganza; a vehicle to announce India’s arrival on the world stage as an economic, cultural and political powerhouse. …

Read more >> CommonWealthDreams

The political economy of Bangladesh — Ishtiaq Ahmed

The key to development and progress is always a combination of political, economic, social and cultural changes that complement one another. Thus a country once derisively described by Henry Kissinger as the ‘world’s basket case’ can actually become the most dynamic of all South Asian nations.

The news from Bangladesh in the last few years has been consistently good, though we in Pakistan have learnt more about the spectacular political advances that country has made in the last year or so. The political advances should indeed be described as spectacular because in an era salient with the menace of Islamism and terrorism, Bangladesh has most wisely and foresightedly chosen to establish itself as a secular democracy. No doubt the political basis for it was laid when an Awami League government won a landslide victory in the December 29, 2008 elections, but the crucial decision was taken by the Supreme Court of that country, which declared Bangladesh a secular democracy in constitutional terms.

Read more >> Daily Times

Collective Volunteerism: An Approach that May Work to Rebuild Pakistan

by K. Ashraf

Social, cultural, economic and political problems are growing in leaps and bounds in Pakistan on daily basis. The situation is so fluid no one can really predict the events of next moment. Is there going to be a suicide bombing, or sniper attack, or some other devastating accident, no one really knows. Fear, desperation, and helpless are the real rulers of Pakistan.

The other day the world press simultaneously broadcasted two news: One out of Mogadishu Somalia and the other from Swat Pakistan. A suicide bomber killed 20 people offering prayers in a mosque in Mogadishu . Another suicide bomber killed 11 people in Swat in Pakistan.

Is Pakistan any better than Somalia ? Perhaps, it is. Somalia does not have a government where as Pakistan does. However, Pakistani government is not any better than non-existent government in Somalia.

Like there is no government in Somalia to control the things there is a government in Pakistan but like Somalia it does not control anything. Pakistani government is nothing, but a herd of incompetent individuals who know how to boast but do not know how to deliver. There incompetence, or lack of desire to deliver, is further complicating the matters.

Pakistan is a country of one hundred and seventy million people. With several large size cities with completely broken life supporting systems, Pakistan is worse than Somalia . One can see horrible scenes across the country every second and feel sorry for the people, but without any effect or impact on its purblind rulers.

President and Prime minister look more sort of jackasses not up to the job they are holding. They are creating more problems in the country through inappropriate actions instead of helping the country move out of shadows of miseries, death and destruction. They spend more time on blaming others than spending half the time on fixing Pakistan’s problems.

There is a parliament in the country. Common Pakistani folks describe it as a rubber stamp or the debating club of thieves and thugs which is not interested in solving peoples’ problems. Within last two years, they have not taken up any issue faced by the people of Pakistan.

Is there a way out for the people of Pakistan? What should they do to resolve their problems? How should they compensate government inadequacies? We suggest they should develop the habit of collective volunteerism. They should form committees at street and city levels to deal with their day to day problems. If they develop the mechanism of collective volunteerism in all communities throughout the country they may start solving their trivial problems. They can help each other fix their broken systems and improve the quality of life in their communities. If they become really organized they can do miracles.

In many countries, the common folks have done these miracles. The people of Pakistan are not any lesser than any other people. They can also rebuild the broken social, cultural, economic and political systems in their communities through collective volunteerism.

Pakistanis are great charity givers. They should erect system to pool in their charities to rebuild the broken systems.

With every thing falling apart, may be collective volunteerism is the approach that may help Pakistanis to rebuild their communities and improve their lives.

Courtesy: CRDP, May 2, 2010

Sindh & Sindhis

Sindh and Sindhis- The modern literature in anthropology, sociology and linguistics

Ibn Khuldun: The Annihilations of Nations and Sindhis

by Gul Agha

To understand the on going social, cultural and linguistic decline among Sindhis, one can look at the modern literature in anthropology, sociology and linguistics to see how nations perish. But the causes have been long understood — the new twist is that the rates can be more precisely measured (each rapid shifts in vocabulary and grammatical forms). A classic work of Ibn Khuldun, *The Muqaddimma, *provides great insight and is a recommended read for any serious student. Ibn Khuldun, a giant of his time, understood how nations perish, and it is instructive to read him and then look at Sindhi society today. Fortunately, Sindhis were able to overthrown other invaders after short periods of time and never had a large scale invasion, at least after the Aryans, until 1947 when Sindh lost 20% of its native population to diaspora, and the remaining nation was linguistically, socially and culturally subjugated by millions of migrants. Here is Ibn Khuldun’s speculation:

*Book I: Kitab al `Ibar (on the nature of civilization) Chapter 2:23. A nation that has been defeated and has come under the rule of another nation will quickly perish.

**The reason for this may possibly lie in the apathy that comes over people when they lose control of their own affairs and, through enslavement, become the instrument of others and dependent upon them. Hope diminishes and weakens. Now, propagation and an increase in civilization takes place only as a result of strong hope and the energy that hope creates in the animal powers (of man). When hope and the things and it stimulates are gone through apathy, and when group feeling has disappeared under the impact of defeat, civilization decreases and business and other activities stop. With their strength dwindling under the impact of defeat, people become unable to defend themselves. They become victims of anyone who tries to dominate them, and a prey to anyone who has the appetite. * (translated by F. Rosenthal)

Another insight Ibn Khuldun provides is how society’s with greater diversity of ideas, sects and beliefs are better able to resist invaders (because, says Ibn Khuldun, they are not prone to conforming with the dominant ideology imposed by invaders, instead they are used to confronting ideas and beliefs, so if you suppress one sect, others dissidents arise). No doubt the deparature of 20% of Sindhi population seriously weaked the Sindhi nation because of the concomittant loss of diversity, but the continued breadth of Sindhi ways remains their strength, their culture of resistance to adopting a single dominant ideology (fundamentalism) and respect for different religious and anti-religious thinking, provides an immense source of residual strength to this day.

We will have to see if the current processes reach their final completion in the perishing of Sindhi nation (*dharnii panaah dde) *or, Sindhis rise to attain their cultural, linguistic, political and social freedom. There is no other stable equilibrium condition in which a nation can survive for long..