Tag Archives: confidence

Canadians losing confidence in Harper Govt.

The Nanos Number

By CBC News

Each Wednesday, Nik Nanos of Nanos Research digs beneath the numbers with Power & Politics host Evan Solomon to get to the political, economic and social forces that shape our lives.

Recognized as one of Canada’s top research experts, Nik Nanos provides numbers-driven counsel to senior executives and major organizations. He leads the analyst team at Nanos, is a fellow of the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association, a research associate professor with SUNY (Buffalo) and a 2013 public policy scholar with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington DC.

Tune in for the Nanos Number, Wednesdays on Power & Politics with Evan Solomon, 5 to 7 p.m. ET on CBC News Network.

View past episodes below:

March 14: More Canadians see the economy getting weaker

The Nanos Number: 27, the percentage of Canadians who think the economy is getting weaker — a five-point increase in February over January. Read more and watch the full episode

March 6: Conservatives losing support

The Nanos Number: 32, the percentage national support for the Conservatives according to the latest Nanos tracking poll — the party’s lowest level in the tracking poll since August, 2009. Read more and watch the episode

Feb. 27: Canadian firms see drop in net profits

The Nanos Number: 29. That’s the percentage drop in net profits for Canadian companies over the past year, according to Statistics Canada. Should Canadians be worried? Read more and watch the episode

Read more » CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/05/28/pol-the-nanos-number.html

Democracy or dictatorship?

Democracy or dictatorship?: Resolute Gilani paves way for govt resolution

By Qamar Zaman / Zia Khan

ISLAMABAD: Steady nerves and a pointed address.

The premier remained composed on Friday, despite a raring opposition and potentially wavering allies in the face of a deepening row with the military and the judiciary – and the government also managed to introduce a highly-anticipated resolution in the house.

The resolution was moved, symbolically enough, by the PPP’s thus far most steadfast ally, Awami National Party (ANP) chief Asfandyar Wali Khan, amid a protest from opposition benches.

Before the resolution, addressing a special session of the National Assembly, Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani said he would prefer going to the people over begging for the opposition’s support for a fresh vote of confidence in parliament.

“I do not need a vote of confidence,” Gilani said, adding that he was elected prime minister unanimously.

The session, it was widely believed, had been convened in the wake of the Supreme Court warning President Asif Ali Zardari and the prime minister of disqualification over the non-implementation of the National Reconciliation Ordinance (NRO) verdict.

But the prime minister snubbed the notion that his government was afraid of the NRO at the get-go.

“We have not come for the NRO. We do not need your support to be saved from the military and have not come for a clash of institutions. We have also not come to be shaheeds (martyrs),” the premier said, responding to the leader of the opposition’s query seeking a justification for the ‘emergency session.’

“Somebody should tell us the reason for convening this session and what you are afraid of,” the leader of the opposition, Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan, had said earlier.

We have to decide whether there should be democracy or dictatorship in the country … democracy should not be punished for our mistakes”. ….

Read more » The Express Tribune

The Bitches!

by Dr. Shazia Nawaz

This is a reply to J. Sahib who keeps calling American women “bitches”. On the beach, we saw these two teenagers wearing shirts; one shirt said bitch no.1, and the other one said bitch #2, we found it hilarious.

It is extremely difficult to understand for a Pakistani man that what kind of self confidence an American (Western) woman has and why.

Europe and America is heaven for women. Myself and my daughter are blessed to be American women.

No one would force us to do anything here. We are free to choose our way of life for ourselves. We do not have to date if we do not want to but if we wanted, no one can stop us. We can wear whatever we want, we can go inside the water (ocean etc) and men do not stand in line staring at us making us feel uncomfortable. No one will force us to go to a bar, we would only go if we wanted to. But no one can kill us here for going to a bar.

We can drive in USA and jog on a street with out being harassed. If our husbands ever hit us, it only takes police to get here in 5 minutes or less. And trust me, they do put a stop to domestic violence, and it works for poor women too. In Pakistan only rich and influential families can protect their daughters from domestic violence.

We can make our own decisions. every single one. Something as simple as if we want to go to a library. I was 25 when internet became a hit in Pakistan. I had just finished my medical school, while my younger brother, 22, was still in medical school. I joined a computer school to learn how to use a computer properly. My brother came to pick me up and saw that there was a video game shop in front of the computer school and about 25 boys were standing there. Although both myself and my brother had studied in co-education all our lives, boys at a video game shops were considered ghunds/lafangas by my brother. So, he decided that since there is a game shop there, I am not allowed to go learn computer. This is what I wanted most at that point in my life; learn how to use a computer.

No matter what a big fight I put up, I was not allowed to go to that computer school again. Society makes it difficult for your brothers. Brothers make it difficult for each others sisters by staring and teasing each others sisters.

Here in USA, we make our own decision. Call us bitches if you want, just know what we have, your women can only dream of. Or perhaps they can not even dream of it, they do not know what it is.

Courtesy: → Pakistani e-lists/ e-groups, August 19, 2011.

Pakistan and the US: beyond the tailspin – Dr Mohammad Taqi

Excerpt:

The military events surrounding Senator Kerry’s Pak-Afghan visits suggest that the US is not about to blink first. The question remains whether the Pakistani establishment will pull back from the brink

So, he surrendered to parliament. Or did he? The Pakistani government’s minister for information would have one believe that he did. But General Ahmed Shuja Pasha may actually be recalling Julius Caesar’s words: veni, vidi, vici! The only difference is that when Caesar claimed ‘I came, I saw, I conquered’, he was reporting to the Roman Senate about his swift military victory over Pharnaces II of Pontus. However, for all practical purposes, General Pasha and the security establishment’s triumph is on the domestic front. For now, they seem to have vanquished parliament quite successfully. Like Molly Bloom in James Joyce’s Ulysses, the PPP, PML-Q and the MQM threw themselves into the military’s arms with a fervent “…and yes I said yes I will Yes”. The PML-N’s chiding notwithstanding, Generals Pasha and Ashfaq Kayani had their cake and got to eat it too.

The well-choreographed Pasha tamasha in parliament and the events preceding and after it has left the Pakistani parliament weaker than ever before. Many of us never had any illusions about the security establishment’s tall tale that the civilians should take charge of foreign and security affairs. But anyone who still had a doubt about the ones calling the shots need not look any further than the US Senator John Kerry’s very first stop on his visit to Pakistan this week. Despite his recent tame requests for the prime minister to convene parliament to discuss the Osama bin Laden fiasco, General Kayani did not find anything wrong with Senator Kerry seeing him before meeting the civilian leadership. A simple change in the visiting senator’s itinerary could have been requested — and very likely accepted by the guest — but it was not. Well, so much for the military’s newfound love for parliament’s supremacy. But one must give credit where it is due. A bakery-running enterprise may not be a fighting force but it could be pretty deft at politics.  ….

…. No matter how Pakistan spins it, the tailspin in its relationship with the US and the world at large cannot be reversed by returning the stealth H-60 Blackhawk’s tail. The Pakistani brass is way too familiar with the words “peanuts” when describing a disproportionately minuscule response to tectonic shifts in geopolitics. Osama bin Laden’s lair, less than a mile away from the Pakistan Military Academy, Kakul, is not a pinprick that the world, let alone the US, would forget so easily. The Pakistani parliament may have been duped with it, but there is every indication that the US Congress and the White House consider the ‘intelligence failure’ excuse an insult to their intelligence.

Senator Kerry’s soft but measured tone indicates that the Pakistani brass still has some time, perhaps through July, to make serious amends but all options, including moving the UN, remain on the table. The senator also seems to have spelt out some of the bare-minimum metrics for any rapprochement. Pakistan’s position vis-à-vis Mullah Omar and his Quetta Shura on the one hand and the Lashkar-e-Tayyaba (LeT) and its various incarnations on the other, will certainly determine the future relationship between Pakistan and the world at large. But if the senator’s visit to Khost — across from North Waziristan — is any indication, the dismantling of the Haqqani network is at the top of the confidence-building agenda. The military events surrounding Senator Kerry’s Pak-Afghan visits suggest that the US is not about to blink first. The question remains whether the Pakistani establishment will pull back from the brink. Unlike the Pakistani parliament, the UN Security Council may actually be difficult to conquer.

To read complete article: Daily Tiems