Tag Archives: Chhattisgarh

Central India aflame with attacks on Christians

The state of Chhattisgarh, in central India, is gaining a reputation for continued attacks by Hindu nationalists on Christians. Chhattisgarh, which borders the states of Orissa and Madhya Pradesh, is the scene where well-known Hindu extremist groups are persecuting religious minorities and continue to accuse Christians of “forced conversions.” It was in nearby Orissa in 2008 that scores of Christian churches and homes were burned, while Christians were murdered. An investigation of the atrocities remains inconclusive.

Last week, a Christian place of worship was incincerated in Kondagaon district in Chhattisgarh. According to a report by the Fides news agency, the Evangelical Fellowship of India, which brings together several evangelical Christian communities, built a chapel of wood and straw in the village Chhote Salna. The chapel was burned down on the evening of April 2 as local Christians looked on helplessly. The land on which the church stood had been donated by local Christians, who came to worship there from elsewhere in the district.

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India: ‘Sindhi should be included as subject in competitive exams’

India: Chhattisgarh: Thanking Chief Minister Dr Raman Singh for according him with status equivalent to a State Minister, Chhattisgarh Sindhi Sahitya Academy President Murlidhar Makhija has requested the State Government to include Sindhi language as one of the subjects for the competitive examinations including Public Service Commission (PSC).

Addressing a press conference at Raipur Press Club, Makhija informed that Sindhi language has been approved by the constitution of India in schedule 8 and it allows the candidate to compete for IAS, PCS and other exams in Sindhi as well. Therefore, he proposed the Chief Minister to include the subject in syllabus of PSC exams too. He also requested State Education Minister Brijmohan Agrawal to include Sindhi as an optional paper in Chhattisgarh Madhyamik Shiksha Mandal so that students would have an opportunity to learn the language.During the conference, Makhija expressed his concern for the great personalities from Sindhi society like Vir Shaheed Hemu Kaladi, Sant Kavar Ram, Sai Jhulelal and Maharaja Dahirsen.

Courtesy: Daily Pioneer
http://www.dailypioneer.com/state-editions/raipur/123176-sindhi-should-be-included-as-subject-in-competitive-exams-.html

Opinion : Why not Sindh State in India if Telangana can be formed?

by: Deepak Keswani

If Central Government feels OK to create the new small states in India, then why not it create a new State named “Sindh State” in India.

Sindh State is being demanded since the India got independence from British empire. Sindhis living in India Lost their motherland in Partition.

If Chhattisgarh, Uttaranchal, Jharkhand can be formed, why not Sindh. Why Government of India is behaving like Step Father to Sindhis.Recently Central Government decided to form Telangana State out of Andhra Pradesh. Everyone is trying to protect their cultural heritage and language. Whats wrong with Sindhis?

When tens of new states are being demanded in the name of Telangana, why not Sindhis say anything? Sindhis have made great contributions in Indian Business Development and plenty of NRIs keep adding foreign exchange of country at the cost of what? At the cost of loosing their own culture & language?

In absence of Sindhi state in India, our language at the verge of dying and new Sindhi generation hardly know any traditions & rituals. Indian government recognized Sindh in National Anthem representing the Sindhi culture and Sindhi people living in India. Does that raises a question mark? Is Indian government really doing something for protecting Sindhis’ culture, language and traditions?

Do you think you can do something for protecting our sweet language which very few are proud of speaking?

Read more – http://sindh-state-in-india.blogspot.com/

The ‘tornado’ awaiting India

Courtesy: The News, Tuesday, October 27, 2009, via Globeistan

by Rahimullah Yusufzai

“I fear there will be a bloody revolution in India,” a retired Indian military officer remarked to this writer and other guests during a recent visit to New Delhi. It was shocking to hear the comment from a soldier, in a country that supposedly had given a voice to its huge population and was believed to be all-inclusive.

It is obvious that India’s much-praised democracy hasn’t brought any real change in the lives of millions of Indians. That some of the poorest men and women are now up in arms in parts of India is evidence enough that democratically elected governments must do more to provide rights and justice to the rural poor and ensure even-handed development in different parts of the country.

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