Tag Archives: BollyWood

India is ready to talk about religion. Is Pakistan?

By Shehzad Ghias

The new Rajkumar Hirani-directed Bollywood movie PK starring Aamir Khan and Anushka Sharma has divided opinions in India. ‘#BanPK’ trended on Twitter, there were protests all over India and religious groups burnt posters of the movie at processions but the movie is in course to be the highest grossing Indian film of all time.

India’s silent majority is letting its position on the issue known by supporting the movie. There are no mass protests in support of the movie but the positive reviews online and thousands of people taking to social media to praise it shows India is ready to have the ‘religion’ debate.

There was outcry from religious groups, and threats of mob violence but the courts and the government must be admired for not bowing down under the pressure of these mobs. The Supreme Court passed a verdict simply saying,

“Don’t watch the film, if you don’t like it.”

It is not as if the religious groups are not as strong in India as in Pakistan, it is just that their state is stronger than ours. In a country with the writ of law, mobs cannot act with complete impunity. The Supreme Court judges who passed this judgment were not afraid they would be shot in their chambers after passing the judgment. Having worked in the legal fraternity in Pakistan, I can testify that some judges in Pakistan are afraid to pass judgments based on their feelings and reason in cases which may involve religion.

Continue reading India is ready to talk about religion. Is Pakistan?

“Watching TV and can’t stop crying.” – Priyanka Chopra

Bollywood mourns Peshawar attack

by Asfia Afzal

As the Taliban attack on a military school in Peshawar has claimed more than 120 lives of school going children; people from across the globe have denounced the monstrous attack on humanity. Bollywood celebrities took to Twitter to show their concern regarding the Peshawar killings in Pakistan.

Ace director Karan Johar said, “The Peshawar killing is just heartbreaking, the death of humanity on every level, helplessness is the only feeling.”

Ritesh Deshmukh said, “Death of Humanity, Wake up World it’s not their issue it’s our issue we need to stand up. #PeshawarAttack”.

Dabbang actress Sonakshi Sinha shared her dismay regarding the recent incident and said, “Oh god! What’s happening in this world? Times like these make you question humanity. Everyone please pray for what’s happening in Peshawar. Terrorism has no religion. People who can do such a thing have no God. Prayers with all the parents and children going through this.”

Priyanka Chopra tweeted, “Watching TV and can’t stop crying. Can’t believe how religion can be used for such a horrid act of violence. No God says it’s ok to kill! and kids?!. I send out a prayer. Please God in whichever form and whatever name. Please teach your children to value human life. I pray for peace. #Peshawar”.

Read more » Business Recorder
See more » http://www.brecorder.com/arts-a-leisure/44-arts/211361-bollywood-mourns-peshawar-attack.html

Pakistan: Back in the picture

By Farahnaz Zahidi

Entering the cinema, I wondered if Zinda Bhaag would be all that they were saying it was. Turns out the neo-realistic film, set in inner city Lahore and directed by Farjad Nabi and Meenu Gaur, was more. Watching the scene where Khaldi, a young man desperate to get out of Pakistan, looks with burning eyes and a quiet longing at his friend Chitta, who is leaving as an illegal immigrant to Italy, I realized that Pakistani cinema had finally arrived.

Zinda Bhaag is the country’s first entry to this year’s Oscars, in the foreign language film category. But equally important, the film’s box-office collections (75 lakh Pakistani rupees in its first week) are an indication that Pakistanis are returning to the cinema. Many youngsters queuing up at the new multiplexes mushrooming across cities are discovering Pakistani films for the first time.

For over a decade, barring the occasional activism-laden films, very few movies have been produced in Pakistan. After the fall of East Pakistan (now Bangaldesh), Pakistan lost over 1,100 cinema screens and a major chunk of talent and technical expertise of the film industry. That, coupled with the steep taxation policies of the mid-’70s, discouraged traditional investors, and new financers entered the game. “Investors, primarily from Punjab, who wanted to turn black money into white via the film industry affected the kind of films made,” says Pakistani film critic Rafay Mahmood, referring to the crass, violence-fuelled Punjabi entertainers that became the staple. Pushto films from the northwest province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa suffered a similar fate.

Pakistani television then became the benchmark for quality, and soon cinema had to compete with this mass medium. Realistic serials like Khuda ki Basti (1969-74) and Waris (1980) were both critically-acclaimed and successful. The ban on Bollywood, in place since 1965, was only lifted in President Musharraf’s era, with a restored version of Mughal-e-Azam that paved the way for more Indian releases. But families preferred watching these films from across the border on their VCRs, as it was both convenient and cheaper.

The ‘revival’ of indigenous films today is due to a number of factors, including the success of Bollywood in Pakistan, which revived exhibitor interest. The advent of multiplexes over the last two years has also helped. The mid 2000s saw a surge in graduates from local institutes like the National Academy of Performing Arts (NAPA) in Karachi, all keen to act in films in Pakistan. They will find a supporter in Nadeem Mandviwalla, the man behind The Platform, Pakistan’s first independent film distribution body launched a few months ago. Mandviwalla promises to incentivize filmmakers experimenting with alternate genres by helping them with film distribution and promotions. Also the owner of multiscreen cinemas like Atrium in Karachi and Centaurus Cineplex in Islamabad, he is enthusiastic about the work he is seeing today. “An industry that had not made films for the last 10 years comes up with Mein Hoon Shahid Afridi (MHSA) and Waar. Imagine what they will produce a decade from now,” he says.

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A Must Watch Film

New theatrical trailer of upcoming movie from nine zero production. Staring Altaf Bhai in a melodious movie that grossed a loss of a million dollar yet entertained millions.

YouTube

Pakistani film BOL coming soon

Pakistani movie Bol takes you through a journey into the life of a family experiencing their troubles, sufferings, and resolves. As family members take decision to solve their problems they step into deeper troubles. The complexity of their circumstances becomes a struggle of life and death. JAB KHILA NAHEEN RAKH SAKTE TO PAIDA KYUN KARTE HO?

YouTube

Bringing Punjabiyat Back

BY: SCHONA JOLLY

“PUNJABI IS MY MOTHER TONGUE, my blood, my soul, my language. I think, dream and feel in it. I will also die in it,” proclaims Amarjit Chandan, an acclaimed poet born in Kenya. “In pardes (abroad),” he explains of his adult life spent in London, “I invented the Punjabiland.”

For a land that has been home to some of the world’s richest civilisations, modern Punjabi culture remains remarkably little known outside the noisy clichés of Bollywood and music videos. As the Indian state of Punjab grapples with complex social and economic issues, the Pakistani province of Punjab collapses due to political woes, and a large diaspora stays settled all over the globe, Punjabi poets and storytellers of old seem to be disappearing along with the water levels in the land of the five rivers. But Punjabis are nothing if not adept at handling change—it is the legacy of their own turbulent history, after all—and there are small but significant signs, that this vibrant melting-pot culture is on the verge of reemergence.

History has not been kind to the people of Punjab. The brutal division of the state during Partition led to both carnage and to one of the biggest mass population movements during the 20th century. Amidst the riots, butchery, rape and devastation, Punjabis of all religious persuasions suddenly found that they had to create new identities. In Pakistan, those identities had to be established through a new, Urdu-speaking nationalist ethos that sought to reimagine the country’s history and culture by severing ties with its neighbour. In India, those identities had to be reshaped by millions of refugees whose culture, possessions, love and longing belonged to another place. In the decades after Partition, hundreds of thousands of Punjabis from both East Punjab, in India, and West Punjab, in Pakistan, left their homelands to seek sanctuary and a new life abroad. For all of these people, the historical and cultural ties to their motherland had to be reforged. The multi-hued complexion of both states had become altered radically overnight.

Lahore, the united Punjab’s former capital, had long been considered the jewel in the crown of North India and had been developed as a cultural capital under both the Mughals and Maharaja Ranjit singh. “Jisne Lahore nahi dekhya, woh janmia nahi (Those who have not seen Lahore, have not lived),” proclaimed popular lore at the time. …

Read more : Wichaar

Tees Maar Khan; Main Aurr Mrs Khanna; Dhobi Ghat; & film awards

– B. R. GOWANI

Ab dil karta hai haule haule se mein toh khud ko gale lagaoon

Kisi aur ki mujhko zaroorat kya mein toh khud se hi pyaar jataoon

Now my heart feels that I should hug myself very gently

why do I need anyone, I can [make] love [to] myself

(from the song “Sheila ki Jawani” or Sheila’s Youth in Hindi/Urdu & English.)

TeesmarkhanYou Tube Link

I have written favorably about Farah Khan’s film, “Om Shanti Om,” as compared with the Arbaaz Khan production “Dabaang.” However, Farah’s third film “Tees Maar Khan” left much to be desired. …

Read more : Globeistan

In Pakistan, ‘Munnis’ are angry with ‘badnaam’ tag

‘Munni’ embarrasses many women in Pakistan

ISLAMABAD: Munni, a mother of two, has been unable to open her little shop in the eastern city of Lahore since “Munni Badnaam Hui” from the Bollywood film ” Dabangg” became a huge hit in Pakistan.

The story is much the same for other ‘Munnis’ on this side of the Indus who wish the song had never been written.

First it was the boys in the neighbourhood, and then the men got wind of the popular song from Salman Khan’s film, and they would all come to Munni’s store and sing ” Munni badnaam hui darling teray liye” and embarrass her.

Read more: THE TIMES OF INDIA

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Munni Badnaam Hui song of film Dabang

You Tube Link

India’s dream of super power-dom

by B. R. GOWANI

Life has really changed in one decade! In 2000 the then President Bill Clinton, paid a five-hour visit to Pakistan (in an unmarked plane) where he lectured the citizens live on the national TV. In India, he spent five days. This was pre 9/11. Clinton’s visit to South Asia then seemed like Gora Bapa was in the land of Kali Mata, i.e., White Father in the land of (goddess) Mother Kali. …

…. Now India wants to be the Super Power with US as its role model. The positive factors for this status include: India’s territorial size, its population, the increasing pace of its technological advances, the entrepreneurship of its people, and the increasing interest of the west in its fashion and movie industry, particularly the Mumbai based Bollywood film industry …

To read full article : Globeistan

Sindhu Sansar present’s interview with Sindhi Bollywood Film Artist Mak Mohan

Sindhu Sansar present’s interview with Sindhi Film Artist of Bollywood Mak Mohan Interviewer : Ashok Manwani Videography

Sambha passed away

Macmohan the famous role played by him in Sholay is the character of sambha passed away due to cancer. Macmohan, who started his career with the film Haqeeqat in 1964, acted in over 175 films in a career spanning 46 years. But his greatest moment came in the 1975 blockbuster when Amjad Khan’s character asks him, (Arre o Sambha, kitna inaam rakhe hain sarkar hum par?) and he answers, (Poore pachaas hazaar). Unfortunately, he passed away.

Sollywood – Sindhi film industry striving hard to revive Sindhi culture

Sindhi film industry striving hard to revive fading culture – by: Leena Mulchandani

–  The Economics Times

About 25 years ago Mangharam Harwani, founder of the $7-billion Denmark-based Sunico group saw a Sindhi musical programme on a VHS cassette (it was the age of VHS!) and the memory of that programme stayed with him as he built his business over the years. Financial success only sharpened that memory and Harwani yearned to do something so as to revive the fading culture of his community in some way. Films, he thought, were what lured the youth and so he decided to produce a Sindhi film – Pyar Kare Dis: Feel The Power of Love in 2007.

Continue reading Sollywood – Sindhi film industry striving hard to revive Sindhi culture

Salman Khan & Katrina Kaif – Haunted by sex video

Bad days have indeed hit Salman Khan and Katrina Kaif. Days after rumours of their split comes some thing much uglier. The webworld is flooded with a fake sex video featuring look-alikes of Salman Khan and Katrina Kaif. The video, possibly made on a cell-phone originated in Canada, but it took no time for it to spread all over the world. Report say that now an MMS clip of the video is also doing the rounds. Due to the uncanny resemblance of the people in the video to Salman Khan and Katrina Kaif, the video was being pitched as an authentic one for quite a while, till some people watched it closely and figured out it was not actually the two Bollywood stars, but look-alikes. Salman and Katrina Kaif have maintained a dignified silence over the issue and have decided to let it die its own death.

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