Category Archives: Sindhi

For 35 years, Sindhi volunteers have helped worshippers at a Chennai mosque break their Ramzan fast

The followers of the Sufi saint Dada Ratanchand carry on the tradition of serving food at the Wallajah Mosque for all thirty days of the fast.

It’s dusk in Chennai. The warm evening light streams in from behind the two white minarets of the Wallajah mosque in Triplicane. In the spacious front yard, more than 50 men wearing white fez caps wait silently. A little before the evening prayers begin in the 220-year-old mosque, a yellow truck swings into the driveway. The men immediately spin into action, unloading metal containers of porridge, biscuits, bananas and vadas.

As they have done for the past 35 years, Sindhi volunteers from the Sufidar Trust – who follow the teachings of Dada Ratanchand, a Partition refugee who settled in Chennai – have gathered to serve iftaar, the meal that ends the daily fast during the month of Ramzan.

The trust aims to spread the teachings of the Sufi saint Shahenshah Baba Nebhraj Sahib of Rohri, Sindh. “We believe all Gods are one, only people have turned it into different sects,” said Govind Bharwani, who has been a volunteer with the Trust almost since its inception. “That is what our guruji told us.”

Read more » Scroll.in
See more » http://scroll.in/article/811273/for-35-years-sindhi-volunteers-have-helped-worshippers-at-a-chennai-mosque-break-their-ramzan-fast

Indo-Canadian Singer Lends Vocals to Sultans of String’s Sindhi Folk Song: Watch

Indo-Canadian songstress Shweta Subram recently collaborated with Juno Award-winning instrumental group Sultans of String and sitarist Anwar Khurshid on a traditional Sindhi folk song, titled “Parchan Shaal Panhwar,” according to a press release.

A fusion of East meets West, “Parchan Shaal Panhwar” is a Sindhi metaphor that translates to “A Personal Struggle for Freedom.” Subram’s soulful voice wonderfully complements the melodic sounds of the Sultans of String, who are known for combining elements of Spanish flamenco, Arabic folk, Cuban rhythms and French manouche gypsy jazz. The music video was released May 3.

Chris McKhool, bandleader and violinist of the Toronto-based Sultans of String, contacted Subram after he came across her successful collaboration with the The Piano Guys on their hit “Don’t You Worry Child (Khushnuma).” This upbeat fusion has now crossed over 15 million views online.

“We were very excited when Shweta agreed to lend her vocals to the album. We were looking for a voice that is rustic yet unique, and Shwetas’ vocal performance in this song is absolutely stunning!” exclaimed McKhool in a press release.

Watch the music video for the “Parchan Shaal Panhwar” song featuring Shweta Subram:

Read more » India West
See more » http://www.indiawest.com/entertainment/global/indo-canadian-singer-lends-vocals-to-sultans-of-string-s/article_684f5d12-3cc3-11e6-84f0-27955cf47a11.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=user-share

A Tribute to the most Sacred River Indus (Sindhu)

A Tribute to the most Sacred River Sindhu , the real source of life for the inhabitants of Indus Valley !

Many poets have praised the mighty Sindhu Nadi in different expressions. Goverdhan Bharati has described Sindhu in her different moods. His imagination and the music composition of C Arjun with Anila Sunder’s colorful performance brings Sindhu alive.
Sung by Teji Bhojwani. In vedas Sindhu has been mentioned many a times.

Courtesy: Sindhi Sangat

Movie on Ancient Indus Civilization, Mohenjo Daro | Official Trailer | Hrithik Roshan & Pooja Hegde

UTV Motion Pictures and Ashutosh Gowariker Productions Present Mohenjo Daro starring Hrithik Roshan and Pooja Hegde The film is directed by Ashutosh Gowariker and releases on August 12, 2016.

Courtesy: UTV Motion

 

Sherman Amendment to Foreign Affairs bill for Sindhi Language Programming Passes Committee Markup

In a House Foreign Affairs Committee markup on July 21, 2011, Congressman Brad Sherman (D-CA) offered an amendment to the Foreign Relations Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012. The amendment required that, of the funds made available to Voice of America, $1.5 million be used only for Sindhi language programming.

Courtesy: YouTube

History of Sindh

In 1947 Sindh’s total population was more than 5.5 million out of which around 1.5 million were Hindus. Karachi’s population was around 525,000 in 1947 out of which more than 260,000 were Hindus. While Hyderabad had a population of over 170,000 out of which 90,000 were Hindus. Hindus made up more than 25% of Sindh while in the Urban areas they made up around 60% of the total population.
More than 750,000 Hindus left Sindh during the partition and now they number over 3 million in India. Karachi had more than 260,000 Hindus out of which almost all of them left for India.
Sindh was one of the most peaceful areas during the partition time, no riots or mass killings took place. Sindhi Muslims were also sad seeing their Sindhi brothers and sisters leaving Sindh forever.
There are still more than 4 million Hindus living in Sindh while 350,000 in Karachi.
Wish if these Hindus had not left for India, Karachi and Hyderabad would have been way ahead of Bombay, Dehli or Lahore.
When it comes to Demographics there are around 5 million Sindhis in India, out of which 1.5 to 2 million Sindhis are local Indian ones who have been living in Kutch and Bikaner since centuries. While in Pakistan there are around 33-35 million Sindhis.
There are also more than 2 million Sindhis living in Diapora, 60% Indian and 40% Pakistani. The growth rate of Pakistani Sindhis in the Diapora is very high.
*The figures given here are not 100% official but can have a fluctuation of 5-10%*
Written by Bilal Akber Mangi.

Courtesy: via Social media/Facebook (This piece of history is taken from Social media.)

World Sufi Spirit Festival: Folk Sindhi Qawwali ‘Duma Dum Mast Qalandar’ By Langa Children

Famous Traditional Sindhi Folk Qawwali ‘Duma Dum Mast Qalandar’ By Langa Children

Every living soul at the venue was mesmerised by the soulful singing of Langa Children during the World Sufi Spirit Festival. Their voices echoed in the entire fort, filling it with a long-lasting divine feeling. The average age of children in this group is between 6 to 14 years. Langa and Manganiar are two Muslim ethnic groups living in the Thar Desert in the west of Rajasthan. Their musicians play traditional, semi-classical music of Western Rajasthan and are often part of important traditional ceremonies, rituals and other festivities.

Venue: World Sufi Spirit Festival at Mehrangarh Fort, Jodhpur, Rajasthan

Video Details: Music Director :-Traditional, Lyrics :-Traditional
Theme & Mood :- Sufi, Label- Saregama India Limited

Courtesy: World Sufi Spirit Festival at Mehrangarh Fort, Jodhpur, Rajasthan

Indus Valley civilisation may pre-date Egypt’s pharoahs

Indus Valley Civilisation known for well-planned cities
Experts carbon dated pottery and animal bones at Bhirrana
They now believe the civilisation is around 8,000 years old
It is thought climate change may not have destroyed the civilisation

By SARAH GRIFFITHS FOR MAILONLINE

With its impressive pyramids and complex rules, Ancient Egypt may seem to many the epitome of an advanced early civilisation.

But new evidence suggests the Indus Valley Civilisation in India and Pakistan, famed for its well-planned cities and impressive crafts, predates Egypt and Mesopotamia.

Already considered one of the oldest civilisations in the world, experts now believe it is 8,000 years old – 2,500 years older than previously thought.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3621622/Indus-Valley-civilisation-pre-date-Egypt-s-pharoahs-Ancient-society-2-500-years-older-thought.html#ixzz4AX8Y3way
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Indus era at least 8,000 years old; ended because of weaker monsoon

Experts have found evidence of the Indus Valley Civilization being at least 8,000 years old and not 5,500 years old.

By Mystery Of India

Due to a recent revelation made by scientists from IIT-Kharagpur and Archaeological Survey of India, time has arrived to rewrite history textbooks. Experts have found evidence of the Indus Valley Civilization being at least 8,000 years old and not 5,500 years old, taking root well before the Egyptian (7000BC to 3000BC) and Mesopotamian (6500BC to 3100BC) civilizations. What’s more, the researchers have found evidence of a pre-Harappan civilization that existed for at least 1,000 years before this. As per a report published in Times of India, this may force a global rethink on the timelines of the so-called ‘cradles of civilization’. The scientists called climate change the reasson behind the ending of the civilization 3,000 years ago.

“We have recovered perhaps the oldest pottery from the civilization. We used a technique called ‘optically stimulated luminescence’ to date pottery shards of the Early Mature Harappan time to nearly 6,000 years ago and the cultural levels of pre-Harappan Hakra phase as far back as 8,000 years,” said Anindya Sarkar, head of the department of geology and geophysics at IIT-Kgp.

Read more » http://www.mysteryofindia.com/2016/05/indus-era-8000-years-old.html

What is the original script of the Sindhi language: Devanagari or Arabic?

Today we write Sindhi in Arabic script, but is it true that the original script of Sindhi is Devanagari?

 

Answer:

By Arvind Iyengar, Professional Student in Linguistics

The short answer is: There is no clear answer to this question.

The answer to your question also depends on when you think the Sindhī language came into being, since languages change at a rapid rate.

The language of Shāh ʿAbdul Latīf Bhiṭṭāī (1689 – 1752 AD), the ‘national poet’ of Sindh, might be quite difficult to understand for a speaker of modern Sindhī. Therefore, can Shāh Latīf’s language be considered Sindhī?

That said, those driven by linguistic pride often claim (usually without proof) that the yet unknown language of the Indus Valley Civilisation was actually Sindhī, and therefore, the script used on the Indus Valley seals must be the original Sindhī script (even though no one knows what the symbols mean).

On similar lines, there might be those who claim that (depending on their ideology) either Arabic or Devanāgarī is the original script of Sindhī, again usually without proof.

A Sindhī translation of the Qurʾān and of the Mahābhārata are believed to have existed as far back as the 11th century (assuming of course that one can safely call this language Sindhī). Whether these were written in a Brāhmī-based script or an Arabic-based script is not clearly known (Brāhmī is the ancestor of the modern Devanāgarī script).

By the early 1800s, it has been attested by several authors, both Indian and European, that there were several different scripts in use for Sindhī, including Haṭavāṇikā (or Kẖudābādī), Gurmukhī and of course Devanāgarī and Arabic.

Continue reading What is the original script of the Sindhi language: Devanagari or Arabic?

Three-day Hyderabad literature festival begins

HYDERABAD: Prominent intellectual and writer Amar Jalil has blamed Sindhis for the deterioration of education in the province and said nobody has compelled them to close down their schools but they themselves have snatched the right to education from their children and youths.

The scholar was among a bevy of writers, poets and intellectuals who spoke at the inauguration ceremony for the three-day Hyderabad Literature Festival organised by the Academy for the Promotion of Art, Literature and Literacy at the Hyderabad Club on Friday.

Mr Jalil said that hundreds of thousands of schools were closed in Sindh and their buildings were handed over to feudal lords to appease them.

He said that school-going children were being destroyed under the heavy burden of bags. He had seen three generations of Sindh who were not educated the way today’s children were getting education, he said.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1252408

I was raised as a boy

 

Shamim Akhtar has a small but mighty presence. All of five feet, she holds herself with a self-possessed reserve, wearing a bold red, tie-dyed hijab with lipstick to match. She speaks fast but deliberately, commanding attention. She has always been confident. This confidence, she says, comes from being raised as a boy.

The eldest of eight children, Shamim was born in 1983 in Molvi Abdullah Mari, a rural village in the Sindh province of Pakistan. Her family belongs to a Baloch caste, a conservative and patriarchal sector of society where men traditionally take precedence over women.

 

“Life was not easy for me,” she said. “When I was born, the girls weren’t allowed to go outside.”

Read more » The Express Tribune
See more » http://blogs.tribune.com.pk/story/33610/i-was-raised-as-a-boy/#disqus_thread

Sindh observes public holiday to celebrate Holi

SINDH: KARACHI (Web Desk / AFP) – Sindh province is observing a public holiday to celebrate Holi today (Thursday), the first time the Hindu “festival of colours” is being officially marked in the overwhelmingly Muslim country.

The move comes days after the federal parliament passed a non-binding resolution that called for the country to observe Hindu and Christian holidays.

A government circular that was tweeted by Bakhtawar Bhutto-Zardari, daughter of the ex-president Asif Ali Zardari, added that all government bodies except essential services would be off for the day.

Read more » DunyaNews
See more » http://dunyanews.tv/en/Pakistan/328991-Sindh-observes-public-holiday-to-celebrate-Holi-

Sindhi entrepreneur invents power bank that charges in just 14 minutes

By Osman Husain

Young Pakistani entrepreneur Abdullah Soomro noticed a very real problem while building his first startup, a hyperlocal delivery business. His delivery riders would be on the road for hours on end and in constant touch with customers on their smartphones. This activity drained their batteries far too quickly, but with charging facilities few and far between, there wasn’t an easy solution in sight.

Abdullah, who’s a mechanical engineer by training, didn’t think existing battery packs were a viable solution. They required hours to charge on their own and were too unwieldy to be lugged around. Realising that this was a problem undoubtedly faced by others, he took it upon himself to figure things out.

Pakistani scientist couple leads the way with underwater drones in Australia

After speaking to some professors at his university to validate his idea, Abdullah forged ahead with his plans and started Micropowerlabs with the aim to build a better, more efficient power bank. He was accepted at an incubation program run by the government of Chile, which gave him US$35,000 as seed capital, and spent six months in the country along with his co-founder.

More juice

What he came up with is Flashpack – a power bank that is able to charge fully in just 14 minutes. Abdullah claims he was inspired by the tech behind batteries for electric vehicles as they are capable of charging ten times faster than regular batteries.

However, the tech hasn’t been properly applied for use in smaller, consumer products yet, he says. “I took the technology that was larger in scale, applied the same principles, and shrunk it down,” explains Abdullah.

Read more » The Express Tribune
See more » http://tribune.com.pk/story/1063306/pakistani-entrepreneur-invents-power-bank-that-charges-in-just-14-minutes/

Sindhi Language Authority

By Emily Hauze

On a bright November morning during my most recent stay in Sindh, my buddies (Inam and Naz) took me to a place I had long been wanting to visit: the Sindhi Language Authority in Hyderabad. And soon I will describe all the interesting things I found there. But I also hope to convey here some sense of what I find so extraordinary about the Sindhi language, and by extension, about the Sindhi people. I am still very far away from my goal of being a true speaker of Sindhi, but I am beginning to make progress. And as I gradually learn to navigate the landscape of the language, more of the inner character and spirit of Sindh is revealing itself to me.

I have been learning about Sindh for only four years, but noticed the unusually intense love among Sindhis for their language very early in that time. When I began to respond to my online friends using even the most basic Sindhi phrases of greeting or farewell, I was amazed at the fireworks of appreciation I received in return. Previously, when trying out a few Urdu phrases, I had also been greeted with surprise and joy — but there was something different and deeper-felt in the reactions to my attempts at Sindhi. And if that was true for my online interactions, how much more emotional and delighted were the responses when I came to utter some of my practiced phrases in Sindh, in person!

​This can be partly explained by the rarity of the situation, since it almost never happens that any non-Sindhi (especially a white Anglo type like myself) learns Sindhi in the first place. It is also unusual for a foreigner to learn Urdu, but not nearly so astonishing, because Hindi-Urdu after all is the language of Bollywood, which is enjoyed around the world. Meanwhile, the cultural treasures of the Sindhi language have not (yet) learned to export themselves so widely. Therefore it is rare a foreigner to encounter the language by chance, and to be drawn into it enough to learn even a phrase or two.

And yet, that is precisely what has happened to me–a chance encounter with a language and a culture, which has resulted in a lasting connection. I am not the first of these rare and lucky souls who discover Sindhi — the beloved Elsa Qazi and others have already blazed the trail — but perhaps I can help open the door for others who may similarly be enriched by it. The Sindhi love of the native language is, I believe, a contagious kind of joy, and the gentle, rolling sound of spoken Sindhi could bring a smile to even the least comprehending face.

Smiling at the sounds is not enough, of course. But learning to comprehend is no easy matter. The challenge is especially great for a non-Asian like myself, who must learn the entirety of the language from the beginning, having nearly no earlier contact with any aspect of its grammar, its alphabet, its phrase structure, its vocabulary, etc.

Continue reading Sindhi Language Authority

Sindhi (Pakistan and India) was the native language of Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the “Father of the Nation” of Pakistan”, says BBC in its article about adding Sindhi to Google translation list

Google Translate introduces 13 new languages including Scots Gaelic and Sindhi

Read more » BBC
See more » http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/35602377/google-translate-introduces-13-new-languages-including-scots-gaelic-and-sindhi

Google Translate adds 13 more languages for a total of 103

Now you can chat with people from Ethiopia and Kyrgyzstan.

By Mariella Moon , @mariella_moon

Google Translate could help connect even more people now that it’s added13 more languages to its roster. Those 13 are Amharic (Ethiopia), Corsican (Corsica island in France), Frisian (Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands), Kyrgyz (Kyrgyzstan), Hawaiian, Kurdish/Kurmanji (Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria), Luxembourgish, Samoan, Scots Gaelic, Shona (Zimbabwe), Sindhi (Pakistan), Pashto (Afghanistan) and Xhosa (South Africa). Google says all of Translate’s 103 available languages cover 99 percent of the online population.

Read more » Engadget
See more » http://www.engadget.com/2016/02/18/google-translate-adds-13-languages/