Communalism in Sindh

FOR some time now, the pluralistic Sufi ethos of Sindh has been under threat from the forces of bigotry. The recent disturbances in the district of Ghotki appear to be part of this ugly trend. On Wednesday, two teenagers belonging to the Hindu community were shot while at a tea shop in the district; one of the victims, Sheetan Kumar, died on the spot. Tensions in the area had been high as earlier reports had emerged about the alleged desecration of the Quran. Local police officials say the suspect involved in the alleged desecration, and who had apparently embraced Islam, was mentally unstable. As is the case whenever matters of such a sensitive nature occur, the reported desecration and the murder sparked communal tension in Ghotki, with protest demonstrations and closures of markets.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1274310

Unforgettable Sindhi songs – Amar Geet – Toon Yaad Wari Aaein – Singer Sonia Kawal

Tribute to Shamsher-ul-Hydri and Original Singer was Mahjbeen Kazekbash. Visit http://sindhimusic.com/ for more videos. AA Production (MAKA Production) presents (Amar Geet Vol-1) the collection of unforgettable Sindhi songs.

Courtesy: AA Production (MAKA Production)

Who were the people of the Indus Valley Civilisation? The Mystery of Mound 4

 

Archaeologists at Rakhigarhi in Haryana hope their excavations throw up an answer to this and more, unlocking the mysteries of the people of ancient India.

Mound 4 looks as unimpressive as it sounds, a small rise with plastic waste and garbage strewn along the three-minute walk to the top. Hundreds of pucca houses have been built on it, complete with cowsheds, the cattle contentedly chewing fodder, the men flaked out on cots in the verandahs, sleeping off the summer afternoon, women heard from inside houses but not seen. Appearances, though, are misleading. Under the sprawling settlement on Mound 4, say archaeologists, is the site of an at least 5,500 year-old human settlement, an important centre of the Harappan Civilisation in the Indus Valley, one that they claim could unlock the mysteries of the people of ancient India. Among the many questions it hopes to answer is an enduring one: who were the people of the Indus Valley Civilisation?

Read more » The Indian Express
See more » http://indianexpress.com/article/lifestyle/art-and-culture/the-mystery-of-mound-4/

“If Someone Speaks Unfairly Of Pakistan, It Is Painful To Me…” – Says Emily An American

How does it feel when a foreigner, especially an American falls in love with Pakistan?

Surprisingly this is not a fairy tale but a true story of Emily Hauze who fell in love with Pakistan and the culture of Sindh. The story does not end here. She initiated on a personal level to improve the image of Pakistan. Isn’t it surprising?

Jovago Pakistan got the opportunity to interview Emily to know more about her views, experiences and thoughts about Pakistan. 

Our first question is who is Emily Hauze? Tell us a little detail about yourself.

I am an American blogger, photographer, and generally curious person. I grew up in a very small town in the southern state of Tennessee, but moved to Pennsylvania, where I did my bachelor’s and master’s degrees (in Music and German literature).

I am a lifelong student of all facets of arts and culture — not only photography but all forms of visual art, and theatre, dance, and of course literature and music.

How do you finance your trips?

In general, the only major expense for me on my trips is the plane ticket. That and also the cost of obtaining a Visa, for which I have to reapply each time I come. But once I arrive in Pakistan, I find that I am not allowed to pay for anything.

Since I always stay with friends, lodgings are not an issue, and food is always abundant and shared freely in Pakistani homes.

I am not much interested in shopping, so I don’t have to save up much for that purpose. Beyond this, many of the cultural and historic sites I visit with my friends and family are free or very inexpensive.

Continue reading “If Someone Speaks Unfairly Of Pakistan, It Is Painful To Me…” – Says Emily An American

Watayo Faqeer

Watayo Faqeer (وتايو فقير) is a Sindhi folk stories character. On a very cold night his mother mother said: “Wataya you are close to God. It’s very cold tonight, can’t you ask God to spare a little bit of fire from hell to keep poor people like us warm here?”

Watayo said: “Mother, there is no fire in hell. Everyone has to bring his own.”

Doucmentry Of Abdul Sattar Edhi

Courtesy:  Al Jazeera + DailyMotion Via ZemTv

See Al Jazeera Doucmentry Of Abdul Sattar Edhi For Nobel Price

JORDAN REMOVES RELIGION FROM NEW SMART ID CARDS

Jordan’s new smart IDs will no longer indicate the cardholder’s religion.

Smart IDs that don’t indicate the holder’s religion are now replacing traditional IDs in Jordan as part of the government’s digitisation program, reports Al Bawaba. Jordanian smart IDs will include data chips containing background information about holder for security purposes.

The move drew criticism from the country’s conservatives who argue that ditching religion from national IDs violates article one of the Jordanian constitution, which declares Islam the state religion – most notably Former MP Zakaria El Sheikh who called the decision an attempt to “strip the country of its Muslim identity.” In response, lawyer Taghrid Doghmy fired back saying the decision was in compliance with the constitution, which stipulates that all citizens are equal under the law, and argues that not specifying a person’s religious views on national ID cards could eliminate religious discrimination.

Read more » cairoscene
See more » http://www.cairoscene.com/BusinessAndPolitics/Jordan-Removes-Religion-from-New-Smart-ID-Cards

For 35 years, Sindhi volunteers have helped worshippers at a Chennai mosque break their Ramzan fast

The followers of the Sufi saint Dada Ratanchand carry on the tradition of serving food at the Wallajah Mosque for all thirty days of the fast.

It’s dusk in Chennai. The warm evening light streams in from behind the two white minarets of the Wallajah mosque in Triplicane. In the spacious front yard, more than 50 men wearing white fez caps wait silently. A little before the evening prayers begin in the 220-year-old mosque, a yellow truck swings into the driveway. The men immediately spin into action, unloading metal containers of porridge, biscuits, bananas and vadas.

As they have done for the past 35 years, Sindhi volunteers from the Sufidar Trust – who follow the teachings of Dada Ratanchand, a Partition refugee who settled in Chennai – have gathered to serve iftaar, the meal that ends the daily fast during the month of Ramzan.

The trust aims to spread the teachings of the Sufi saint Shahenshah Baba Nebhraj Sahib of Rohri, Sindh. “We believe all Gods are one, only people have turned it into different sects,” said Govind Bharwani, who has been a volunteer with the Trust almost since its inception. “That is what our guruji told us.”

Read more » Scroll.in
See more » http://scroll.in/article/811273/for-35-years-sindhi-volunteers-have-helped-worshippers-at-a-chennai-mosque-break-their-ramzan-fast

Wikipedia Beta

Welcome to Wikipedia Beta for Android! You can install Wikipedia Beta alongside your current version of Wikipedia for Android, so you can test our new features before they go live for all Wikipedia for Android users. Your feedback will help us fix bugs and decide what features to focus on next.

Read more » Google play
See more » https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.wikipedia.beta

Indo-Canadian Singer Lends Vocals to Sultans of String’s Sindhi Folk Song: Watch

Indo-Canadian songstress Shweta Subram recently collaborated with Juno Award-winning instrumental group Sultans of String and sitarist Anwar Khurshid on a traditional Sindhi folk song, titled “Parchan Shaal Panhwar,” according to a press release.

A fusion of East meets West, “Parchan Shaal Panhwar” is a Sindhi metaphor that translates to “A Personal Struggle for Freedom.” Subram’s soulful voice wonderfully complements the melodic sounds of the Sultans of String, who are known for combining elements of Spanish flamenco, Arabic folk, Cuban rhythms and French manouche gypsy jazz. The music video was released May 3.

Chris McKhool, bandleader and violinist of the Toronto-based Sultans of String, contacted Subram after he came across her successful collaboration with the The Piano Guys on their hit “Don’t You Worry Child (Khushnuma).” This upbeat fusion has now crossed over 15 million views online.

“We were very excited when Shweta agreed to lend her vocals to the album. We were looking for a voice that is rustic yet unique, and Shwetas’ vocal performance in this song is absolutely stunning!” exclaimed McKhool in a press release.

Watch the music video for the “Parchan Shaal Panhwar” song featuring Shweta Subram:

Read more » India West
See more » http://www.indiawest.com/entertainment/global/indo-canadian-singer-lends-vocals-to-sultans-of-string-s/article_684f5d12-3cc3-11e6-84f0-27955cf47a11.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=user-share

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa belongs to Afghans: Achakzai

Pashtun leader Mahamood Khan Achakzai has said that he would not allow anyone to harass Afghan refugees in their “own land”. He directly said that Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province belongs to Afghans and they can live there without fear and irritation.

“If Afghans are harassed in other parts of Pakistan, they should come here to the Pakhtunkhwa province, where no one can ask them for refugee cards, because it also belongs to them,” Achakzai who leads the Pakhtunkhwa Millie Awami Party said.

Read more » The Pashtun Times
See more » http://thepashtuntimes.com/khyber-pakhtunkhwa-belongs-to-afghans-achakzai/