Pakistan – Downtown Karachi: A street called love

BY M BILAL HASSAN

Marred by years of political and sectarian violence, Karachi does not have the best reputation; judging by news headlines over the past few years, many would think of it as being a highly intolerant urban centre. However, having gone to school and college with almost every religious community represented in the city, I find it hard to digest that the population of Karachi is hateful or prejudiced.

And so, I set out on foot to explore the downtown area of Karachi.

I started walking from the historic Zaibunissa Street all the way towards St. Patricks Cathedral. To my utter delight, every subsequent block I walked by was inhabited by a different religious community. Here, these communities have lived harmoniously with one another for many years.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1201229

Clashes erupt in Athens on anniversary of student’s killing by police

Black-clad protesters and riot police fought pitched battles in Athens on Sunday on the seventh anniversary of a teenager’s killing by police.

The shooting of 15-year-old Alexandros Grigoropoulos in 2008, a year before Greece‘s economic crisis began, had led to the country’s worst riots in decades. The annual march draws thousands of anti-establishment and anti-austerity protesters.

Sunday’s violence erupted at the end of a peaceful march through Athens. Demonstrators threw scores of petrol bombs, bricks and broken marble at police in riot gear who responded with tear gas and stun grenades.

Read more » Reuters
See more » http://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-eurozone-greece-clashes-idUKKBN0TP0SG20151207

California shooting: Female assailant became hardline in Saudi Arabia, say relatives

BY REUTERS

KAROR ESAN: The estranged relatives of Tashfeen Malik, a Pakistani woman accused of shooting dead 14 people in California, say she and her father seem to have abandoned the family’s moderate Islam and became more radicalised during years they spent in Saudi Arabia.

Malik, with her husband Syed Rizwan Farook, 28, is accused of storming a gathering in San Bernardino, California, on Wednesday and opening fire in America’s worst mass shooting in three years.

Investigators are treating Wednesday’s attack as an “act of terrorism”.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1224551/

The left and rape : why we should all be ashamed of the left’s role in covering up the rape of 2 million women.

How I was a rape denier & accepted rape myths

 Posted By Juan Conatz

Denial: Twenty odd years ago I picked up a battered old paperback in one of my city’s many wonderful second a woman in berlinhand bookshops.It was called “A Woman In Berlin”. Not only was it a personal testimony, in fact a diary, from the Second World War – a pet favourite subject. It was by a woman. And it was set in the Berlin of Germany’s Year Zero (1945).

However, I stopped reading it when it became clear that the main bit of history it dealt with was the rape of two million German women by the Red Army, the Liberators of Europe. I stopped not because I couldn’t cope with reading personal accounts of being gang raped (though that would certainly put me off it now).

I stopped reading it because I didn’t want to believe it.

Read more » Libcom
See more » http://libcom.org/library/left-rape-why-we-should-all-be-ashamed-left%E2%80%99s-role-covering-rape-2-million-women

Split personality

BY SHAHAB USTO

THE recent spike in attacks on security forces has yet again exposed Karachi’s vulnerable security environment, prompting the provincial government to add more anti-terrorism courts, prosecutors and police personnel. However, it bears thinking whether these actions are sufficient to meet the security challenges that are rooted not only in terrorism but, more significantly, in the three constants of Karachi’s body politic — identity, ownership and governance.

Identity: Karachi was initially a small but cosmopolitan city, where various communities lived in harmony. But after independence, the city’s socio-cultural and political complexion kept changing because of four successive influxes. First, from 1947 through the 1950s, Karachi came to be identified as predominantly Urdu-speaking. Thousands of people from the Indian provinces of UP, Bihar and what was then known as Central Provinces, settled in the city while a large number of Hindus and Sikhs left for India.

In the 1960s, Karachi received the second wave of immigrants, mainly Pakhtun, from the then NWFP. As they entered the labour market particularly in the construction, transport, security and ports and shipping sectors, the city’s ethnic relations came under strain and riots ensued.

The third influx found its way to Karachi in the 1980s following the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. Many of these Afghans even received local residencies, thanks to state patronage and connivance of local registration offices. Indeed, the ‘Afghan factor’ combined with Gen Ziaul Haq’s policy of dividing political forces in Sindh along ethnic lines to weaken the PPP’s urban appeal, drastically transformed the city’s face and security environment. The city saw an emergence of an arms-and-drugs market and the attendant political and criminal militias controlling various territories through violence.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1224471

Karachi like rest of Sindh rejected right-wing -religious politics

Next Karachi mayor likely to be from MQM — PTI, JI face setback

KARACHI: Following days of electioneering, canvassing and political debates, the day for local bodies election in Karachi came to an end and vote count in the polling stations is underway, ARY News reported.

The trend so far shows that Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) is likely to bring next Karachi mayor as the party has secured majority of seats in the local government elections.

The polling began at 7.30am and ended 5.30pm without any break.

The election were held in six districts of Karachi – District Central, District West, District Korangi, District East, District South and District Malir.

Read more » ARY News
See more » http://arynews.tv/en/polling-karachi-local-bodies-election-government/

Pakistan must abandon the jihadist ideology which forms the ethos of Islamist terrorist organisations

The ideology of Pakistan, its founding fathers’ legacies and the ambitions thrust upon the state are marred with the same delusion of the Islamic state, which motivates Islamist terrorist organizations today

By Harbir Singh

A commentator from South Asia who has tried to understand the psyche and motivations of Pakistan with some success may be utterly unfamiliar with the wider Islamic world, but ISIS will not be unfamiliar because ISIS speaks a radical form of the same language one hears from hyper-nationalists. The difference is that Pakistani hyper-nationalists are less daring, less bold, more fearful in their interpretation of the doctrine that motivates ISIS. They are limited in thinking to the geographical region that Pakistan occupies on the globe and to the people who inhabit this region. They are concerned with the continuity and success of the state of Pakistan within the Muslim narrative, for they haven’t the courage to take upon themselves the responsibility for the larger purpose that they are well aware of, something that Islamist militant organizations have stepped up to do.

The Two Nation Theory is South Asia specific subset of the Islamist ideology. Pakistan, in fact, came into being as an ‘Islamic State’ – the Islamic State of Not-India.

Read more » The Nation
See more » http://nation.com.pk/blogs/04-Dec-2015/pakistan-must-abandon-the-jihadist-ideology-which-forms-the-ethos-of-islamist-terrorist

ISIS loyalist woman in San Bernardino massacre is linked to Pakistan’s most notorious radical cleric and mosque known as center for fundamentalists

 

  • US officials have handed information to Pakistani authorities linking Tashfeen Malik to country’s notorious Red Mosque
  • Pakistani authorities now considering a move against Maulana Aziz, the preacher at the mosque who this year proclaimed support for ISIS
  • Malik was born in Pakistan, brought up in Saudi, and returned four years ago to study pharmacy degree at university
  • Pakistani prime minister’s brother held talks with US officials in London over country’s link to massacre of 14 in San Bernardino 

By Imtiaz Hussain For Dailymail.com and David Martosko, Us Political Editor For Dailymail.com

The woman who took part in the ISIS-inspired San Bernardino massacre is linked to her native country’s most notorious radical mosque, American officials believe.

Sources have told Daily Mail Online that US officials handed over information to their Pakistani counterparts about links between Tashfeen Malik and the Red Mosque in Islamabad.

The mosque is infamous for its links to violence and authorities in Pakistan are now considering taking action against its preacher, Maulana Abdul Aziz, after the disclosures by US officials.

See more » Daily Mail
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3346618/ISIS-loyalist-woman-San-Bernardino-massacre-linked-Pakistan-s-notorious-radical-cleric-mosque-known-center-fundamentalists.html

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3346618/ISIS-loyalist-woman-San-Bernardino-massacre-linked-Pakistan-s-notorious-radical-cleric-mosque-known-center-fundamentalists.html#ixzz3tSdgxMmc
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

 

 

Pakistan’s contrary years (1971-1977): A cultural history of the Bhutto era

BY NADEEM F. PARACHA

Modern cultural historians have usually defined the 1970s as being one of the most implosive decades of the 20th century.

Their fascination with the 1970s has continued to this day — they describe the era as a period in modern history in which various contemporary ideologies of the left and the right fought their most decisive battles.

The 1970s were no different in Pakistan as well.

Flamboyant and edgy, here too, the prominent veneer of freewheeling cultural brashness and populism of the decade finally mutated and triggered social profligacy and economic downturns that (by the late 1970s) eventually gave way (around the world) to the emergence of starker forces of the ‘New Right’. Who, in turn, would go on to redefine global politics and society from the 1980s onwards.

The cultural and political flamboyance of the 1970s eventually collapsed on itself.

Incidentally (and rather aptly), the 1970s in Pakistan were dominated by one of the country’s most enigmatic, flamboyant and contradictory politicians ever: ZA Bhutto.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1223761

China and South Africa in $6.5bn worth of deals

China and South Africa have signed deals and loans valued at $6.5bn (£4.3bn), with the focus on building infrastructure in the African giant.

The deals were announced during a four-day visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping to increase trade and investment between the two countries.

About 26 deals were signed on Wednesday, with $2.5bn going to South Africa’s state-owned rail operator.

China has given a series of loans to African countries for development.

Read more » BBC
See more » http://www.bbc.com/news/business-34991846

Putin: Turkey ‘will regret’ downing Russian bomber in Syria

Russian President Vladimir Putin has castigated Turkey’s leaders, warning that they will regret shooting down a Russian Su-24 bomber in Syria.

In a state of the nation speech, broadcast live on Russian television, he said that “if anyone thinks Russia’s reaction will be limited to trade sanctions, they are deeply mistaken”.

“We’ll remind them again what they did – they will regret it.”

Read more » BBC
See more » http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-34993629

California killing: Female assailant was from Pakistan, CAIR claims

BY REUTERS

SAN BERNARDINO: The female assailant gunned down following the shooting rampage in a banquet at a social services centre for the disabled in San Bernardino, California, was of Pakistani origin, claimed Hussam Ayloush, executive director of the Los Angeles chapter of CAIR (Council of American Islamic Relations).

The couple were married for two years and have a six-month-old baby girl, claimed Ayloush.

On Wednesday morning, Syed Rizwan Farook, 28, and Tashfeen Malik, 27, dropped off their six-month-old baby with Farook’s mother, saying they were going to a doctor’s appointment.

Read: Suspects Syed Farook, Tashfeen Malik kill 14 in California shooting: authorities

By noon, according to police, the couple had donned assault clothing, armed themselves with rifles and stormed a holiday party attended by San Bernardino County employees, killing 14 people and wounding 17 others.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1223982/

 

San Bernardino shooting: Police kill two suspects after hunt

Police in California have named two suspects killed after a mass shooting which left 14 people dead at a social services centre.

The man and woman, Syed Rizwan Farook, 28, and Tashfeen Malik, 27, were killed in an exchange of fire with police.

Farook had been a San Bernardino public health employee for five years, police chief Jarrod Burguan said.

The attack took place at an event on Wednesday for Farook’s colleagues. None of the victims has been identified.

No motive has been established, but the FBI is considering both workplace violence and terrorism, according to David Bowdich from the bureau’s Los Angeles office.

Read more » BBC
See more » http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-34991855

Afghan Taliban leader Mullah Akhtar Mansour has been seriously wounded in shooting at a meeting of militants in Pakistan

Afghan Taliban leader Mansour ‘wounded in gunfight’

Afghan Taliban leader Mullah Akhtar Mansour has been seriously wounded in shooting at a meeting of militants in Pakistan, Taliban sources say.

Four Taliban gunmen were killed in the gunfight after an argument on the outskirts of Quetta, a source said.

Another report said Mullah Mansour died but this is unconfirmed.

Read more » BBC
See more » http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-34983477

Cow is safer in India than a Muslim: Shashi Tharoor

By PTI

NEW DELHI: Congress leader Shashi Tharoor today quoted some “Bangladeshi friend” to contend that a “cow is safer in India than a Muslim” to suggest “growing intolerance” in the country.

Participating in the debate on intolerance in the Lok Sabha, he said the Modi government cannot promote ‘Make in India’ while there is “hate in India”.
Read more » The Economic Times
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics-and-nation/cow-is-safer-in-india-than-a-muslim-shashi-tharoor/articleshow/50002191.cms
Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/50002191.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

Why Russia needs China to buy its weapons

Despite intellectual property concerns, Russia recently agreed to sell 24 Sukhoi Su-35 fighter jets to China – a deal worth $2 billion. But what is driving Moscow to seek deeper trade ties with Beijing? DW examines.

By Gabriel Domínguez

The deal, announced last week by Russian defense conglomerate Rostec, makes China the first foreign contractor of the multi-role Sukhoi Su-35 (main picture), an upgraded and highly maneuverable fighter jet. While the deal has yet to be confirmed by Beijing, Russian daily newspaper Kommersantquoted Rostec CEO Sergey Chemezov on November 19 as saying: “The protracted talks on Su-35 deliveries to China have ended. We have signed the contract.”

The agreement reportedly includes not only the supply of 24 jets to the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) for a total of $2 billion ($83 million per unit) but also the delivery of ground support equipment and reserve aircraft engines. The first batch of the planes, with the NATO reporting name Flanker-E, is expected to be delivered next year.

A win-win situation?

Russian sales of advanced weapons to China, including modern combat aircraft, are not new. Indeed, throughout the post-Soviet period, China has been one of Russia’s most important customers for arms exports. The Chinese have been purchasing systems, such as the Su-27 fighter jet, and advanced surface-to-air missiles, from Russia for over a decade.

Read more » DW
See more » http://www.dw.com/en/why-russia-needs-china-to-buy-its-weapons/a-18870472?maca=en-Facebook-sharing