Pakistan an emerging market economy: IMF

BY ANWAR IQBAL

WASHINGTON: In its latest World Economic Outlook report, the International Monetary Fund has included Pakistan in emerging market economies.

An emerging market economy is the one that is progressing toward a more advanced stage, usually by means of rapid growth and industrialization. These countries experience an expanding role both in the world economy and on the political frontier.

The IMF projects that Pakistan’s real GDP will continue to grow modestly, reaching 5.2 percent by 2020.

It was 4.0 percent in 2014, 4.2 percent in 2015 and is projected to reach 4.5 percent in 2016.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1218182/

Not without my son

By ,TNN

Two mice fall into a bucket of cream. The first one gives up early and dies. The second one keeps thrashing about till one day, the cream turns into butter and it crawls out. Few years ago, Hamid Ansari narrated this short story to an auditorium full of school dropouts in Mumbai. Today, his mother is the second mouse.

For over two years now, Fauzia Ansari has been desperately burrowing through a series of tough hearts on both sides of the border to find her son, Hamid. In November 2012, Hamid had set off to meet a girl in Kohat near Peshawar that he had fallen in love with online. On the pretext of a job interview at Kabul airport, the then 27-year-old management graduate flew to Afghanistan and later illegally entered Kohat. Here, after checking into a hotel on November 14, 2012, he disappeared. It was only recently that the Pakistani police admitted that Hamid had been arrested by the local police on the information of Inspector Naeem Ullah of Intelligence Bureau, Kohat.

Read more » The Times of India
See more » http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/stoi/deep-focus/Not-without-my-son/articleshow/45839374.cms?from=mdr

‘Looking East’: A trip to Middle Kingdom

BY MOHAMMED ADIL SAMI

The word China conjures a wide variety of different images. A typical Chinese house with curved and sloping roofs, people with their pants up to their ankles and hats in paddy fields or people with pencil thin tweaked moustaches with round and red cheeks and high hairstyles similar to the Emperors of earlier dynasties, and cities that are overcrowded, funny smells, and exotic spices and foods.

Fortunately or unfortunately, none of these things hold true for China today, at least for the two cities that I visited during my predominantly business trip there.

Despite there being many flights daily to China, our geographical position is interesting.

Though China and Pakistan are neighbours, the presence of the Karakoram, Hindukush and Himalaya mountain ranges has made this region relatively inaccessible and our sense of China, unlike India, is all that is conjured in books, pictures, films and from ancient history.

Read more » DAWN
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The Pakistan Nuclear Nightmare

By

With as many as 120 warheads, Pakistan could in a decade become the world’s third-ranked nuclear power, behind the United States and Russia, but ahead of China, France and Britain. Its arsenal is growing faster than any other country’s, and it has become even more lethal in recent years with the addition of small tactical nuclear weapons that can hit India and longer-range nuclear missiles that can reach farther.

These are unsettling truths. The fact that Pakistan is also home to a slew of extremist groups, some of which are backed by a paranoid security establishment obsessed with India, only adds to the dangers it presents for South Asia and, indeed, the entire world.

Read more » The New York Times
See more » http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/08/opinion/sunday/the-pakistan-nuclear-nightmare.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share&_r=0