Naomi Klein: the hypocrisy behind the big business climate change battle

Richard Branson has pledged $3bn to fight climate change, and delivered just $230m. Naomi Klein looks at the ‘greenwashing’ of big business and its effects – on the planet, and our own bodies

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I denied climate change for longer than I care to admit. I knew it was happening, sure. But I stayed pretty hazy on the details and only skimmed most news stories. I told myself the science was too complicated and the environmentalists were dealing with it. And I continued to behave as if there was nothing wrong with the shiny card in my wallet attesting to my “elite” frequent-flyer status.

A great many of us engage in this kind of denial. We look for a split second and then we look away. Or maybe we do really look, but then we forget. We engage in this odd form of on-again-off-again ecological amnesia for perfectly rational reasons. We deny because we fear that letting in the full reality of this crisis will change everything.

And we are right. If we continue on our current path of allowing emissions to rise year after year, major cities will drown, ancient cultures will be swallowed by the seas; our children will spend much of their lives fleeing and recovering from vicious storms and extreme droughts. Yet we continue all the same.

What is wrong with us? I think the answer is far more simple than many have led us to believe: we have not done the things needed to cut emissions because those things fundamentally conflict with deregulated capitalism, the reigning ideology for the entire period we have struggled to find a way out of this crisis. We are stuck, because the actions that would give us the best chance of averting catastrophe – and benefit the vast majority – are threatening to an elite minority with a stranglehold over our economy, political process and media.

That problem might not have been insurmountable had it presented itself at another point in our history. But it is our collective misfortune that governments and scientists began talking seriously about radical cuts to greenhouse gas emissions in 1988 – the exact year that marked the dawning of “globalisation”. The numbers are striking: in the 1990s, as the market integration project ramped up, global emissions were going up an average of 1% a year; by the 2000s, with “emerging markets” such as China fully integrated into the world economy, emissions growth had sped up disastrously, reaching 3.4% a year.

Read more » The Guardian
See more » http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/sep/13/greenwashing-sticky-business-naomi-klein

‘Terrorism and talks can’t go hand in hand’: 5 quotes from Sushma Swaraj’s UN speech

In her speech at United Nations, Sushma Swaraj not just countered Pakistan on Kashmir, but also outlined India’s vision for the world.
1. Pakistan PM gave four pointers. I should tell him that they are redundant. Only one pointer is important — ‘give up terror’   2.Terrorism and talks cannot go together. Give up terrorism, let us sit down and talk
3. Pak has not honoured past assurances on ending cross-border terrorism; mastermind behind 26/11 attacks continue to roam free
4. United Nations has failed to address new challenges to international peace and security
5. We have to include more developing nations in the decision making structures of security council
Read more » The Times of India
See more » http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/5-quotes-from-Sushma-Swarajs-UNGA-speech/listshow/49188634.cms

Pakistan’s Foreign exchange reserves all-time high at $20 billion

BY IRFAN HAIDER

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s foreign exchange reserves have crossed an all time high mark of US $20 billion on Thursday, said a statement issued here.

According to details, the reserves includes $15.24 billion that are with the State Bank of Pakistan (SBP) while another $4.83 billion are held by the commercial banks.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1210218/

Attacking Pak Army Hqrs an option: Indian Army

By Faisul Yaseen

Srinagar, Sept 29: Brigadier J S Cheema of the Army’s Baramulla-based 19th Infantry Division said attacking Pakistan Army headquarters in Rawalpindi was an option with the Indian Army.

Addressing a conference organized by the Army to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the end of 1965 war at Army’s strategic Srinagar-based 15 Corps headquarters, Brig Cheema said, attacking Pakistan Army headquarters was an option with the Indian Army.
“What are we waiting for? Another 26/11?” he said.
Brig Cheema said New Delhi should deal with Islamabad the way the United States dealt with Pakistan when it carried the Operation Neptune Spear in May 2011 that resulted in the death of the former Al-Qaeda chief, Osama Bin Laden in Abbottabad, Pakistan.
He said Indian Army had already carried attacks inside another country – Myanmar – by attacking the camps of its rebel leaders and attacking Pakistan Army headquarters would not be something new.
Indian Army had “crossed over to Myanmar territory” and launched a massive search involving hundreds of Army men and helicopters to track down the rebels during the operation.
Brig Cheema also said that the Army needs to play a role in making the separatist leadership in Kashmir irrelevant.
Read more » Rising Kashmir
See more » http://www.risingkashmir.com/news/attacking-pak-army-hqrs-an-option-indian-army/

Where does Pakistan stand as India chases digital dreams?

BY ALEEM BAWANY

Dubbed as the hub of start-ups, India has done immensely well for itself over the past few decades in the IT sector, and has a number of things going for it that Pakistan has yet to catch up on. Most of these are top-down investments. The biggest is the raw engineering talent that is coming out of India each year.

Take a look: Modi heads to Silicon Valley chasing a digital dream

For example, 1.3 million students sit in for Indian Institute of Technology (IITs) admission tests. This doesn’t factor in the national and regional institutes which further add to the engineering talent base. Pakistan needs far more engineering institutes than it currently has.

Following the swelling of the engineering talent pool, India has also seen a large uptake in Venture Capital (VC), driven largely by healthy returns in technology. A lot of this is fuelled by Indian alumni working overseas and having established themselves in enviable executive positions — the CEOs of Google, Microsoft and Adobe are all of Indian origin. Bollywood has also jumped on the bandwagon with most actors going beyond just endorsements and actually taking partnerships in tech start-ups.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1209941/

Paksitan women cricket team win T20 series against Bangladesh by 2-0

KARACHI (Staff Report) – Pakistan women cricket team on Thursday defeated Bangladesh by 34 runs in the second T20 match at Southend Club ground in Karachi.

The cricket team has also won the two match T20 series by 2-0.

While chasing Pakistan’s 115-run target, the Bangladesh team could only score only 80 runs for seven wickets in the given 20 overs. Rumana Ahmed remained the top scorer who scored 27 runs.

Pakistan’s Sumaiya Siddiqi and Nida Dar grabbed two wickets each for the green-shirts.

Earlier while batting first Pakistan team scored 114 runs when Bisma Maroof and Marina Iqbal contributed 44 and 33 runs respectively.

Bangladesh’s Nahida Akter picked two wickets, while Salma Khatun and Lata Mondal each dismissed one Pakistani player.

Earlier Pakistan team had won the first T20 by 29 runs on Wednesday.

The visiting Bangladeshi women team will play first ODI on October 4 followed by the second ODI on Oct 6.

News courtesy » Daily Pakistan
Read more » http://en.dailypakistan.com.pk/sports/paksitan-women-cricket-team-win-t20-series-against-bangladesh-by-2-0

More details » BBC urdu
See more » http://www.bbc.com/urdu/multimedia/2015/10/151001_pak_bangla_women_t_20_pics_zz#
Read more in urdu » http://www.bbc.com/urdu/sport/2015/10/151001_women_twenty_match_hk