Arriving in Pakistan on August 15, an Indian recounts his visit

BY VASANT DAVÉ

As dawn broke on 15th August, India’s Independence Day, I landed at the Lahore airport. A few hours earlier, Pakistan had celebrated its Independence Day, and the entire place was bedecked with green flags carrying the crescent.

One could sense hope and excitement in the atmosphere even at that early hour.

I reached the immigration counter, preparing myself to be grilled by an officer, whom I imagined would be looking like a headmaster about to discipline an errant school boy. My feet came to an abrupt halt. Behind the desk sat a young lady wearing a black hijab.

She shattered my perception that most Pakistani women were burqa-clad, like the ones we see in Bhopal and Lucknow.

I handed my passport, both my cataract-operated eyes keen to watch how her comely face would look when she twitched her nose – that’s just what a bearded co-passenger had once done upon spotting the logo of the three lions on my passport.

She leafed through it, stamped it, and returned it with a smile, “Happy Independence Day to you, Sir.” Her words shattered my second perception: That every Pakistani was as hostile to India as those elderly Pakistani guests in our TV debates. In the following three days, I came to understand the people of Pakistan even further, and discovered that basically, we are more alike than different. The average Pakistani has the same anxieties as we do in India – price hikes, children’s safety and education, the impact of saas-bahu TV serials on our family life, and a deep concern for the future.

Also read: Crossing borders: Why every Indian should visit Pakistan

My tryst with Pakistan had commenced on a rainy June morning, when I opened the Facebook page of my novel, and out popped a message from a stranger – Dr Shahid Ahmad Rajput, Professor at COMSATS Institute in Islamabad.

He informed me about an international conference, referred me to his Facebook wall, and asked if I would be interested in participating. He also added, “I’m intrigued by the title Trade winds to Meluhha.”

Trade winds to Meluhha is my novel, set in the ancient Indus Valley Civilisation and Mesopotamia.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1208023/

Who will be the next Army Chief? Name comes up.

Though rising popularity graph of Chief of Army Staff (COAS) General Raheel Sharif makes it unlikely to be not given extension as he is the most adored personality of the nation.

For the sake of argument, if Raheel Sharif, who is due to retire from his post on November 29, 2016, does not take extension, who will be the next COAS?

Media reports suggest that four most senior Generals are to retire next month including Lieutenant General Nasir Janjoa, Syed Tariq, Mohammad Ayaz, and General Naved Zaman.

In this scenario, Officers in the back of the list will come up on the basis of seniority, on the top of the list is General Maqsood Ahmed’s name. Source: The News Tribe

Who will be General Raheel Sharif’s successor?
http://www.thenewstribe.com/2015/09/18/who-will-be-general-raheel-sharifs-successor/

Courtesy: Defence Pakistan
Read more » http://defence.pk/threads/who-will-be-the-next-army-chief-name-comes-up.398260/

Read more in Urdu language » Qudrat
Learn more » http://qudrat.com.pk/pakistan/19-Sep-2015/70100

Via Facebook (Social media)

India’s new Operating system developed by Defence Research and Development Organization, DRDO

Welcome India’s own Operating System – Bharat Operating System Solutions (BOSS)

BY 

The Indian government is all set to launch a new version of its own operating system- Bharat Operating System Solutions (BOSS), which is likely to replace Microsoft Windows in the future.

The new operating system (OS) developed by C-DAC (Centre for Development of Advanced Computing), will be unveiled to all government stakeholders this week, as mentioned in a DNA news article.

After the successful launch of the Digital India and Make in India initiatives by PM Modi’s government, this new OS is targeted to prevail over the vulnerabilities existing in government cyberspace under threat from the Chinese hackers in the past.

The latest version of BOSS, which is soon to be released is code-named ‘Anoop’ and will be the successor to BOSS 5.0 code-named as ‘Anokha’. The latest version was built using the Linux Platform with the help of Gujarat Technical University, DRDO and other private computer manufacturers. This OS will be available in 18 languages including regional languages such as Assamese, Malayalam, Bengali, Marathi, Gujarati and other major Indian languages.

History:

BOSS was initially developed in 2007 by National Resource Centre for Free/Open Source Software (NRCFOSS) of India. At that time, it was available as a free and open source operating system. However its unpopularity was due to lack of adoption and faster upgrades offered by other operating systems. The earlier version was also less user-friendly and had few features as compared to the latest version.

Cyber-attack threat overcome:

The revamped version of BOSS is considered as a vital step by the Centre towards having its own secure operating system. During the past three months of trial undertaken by several government agencies including the Army intelligence, the highly improvised version of BOSS successfully resisted all attempts of cyber-attacks highlighting its efficiency as a secure OS.

“It answers government’s need to have a fully secure network. Fresh codes unique to the system have been written for the OS. Its source code that makes it safe and secure will have to be guarded at all cost,” sources said.

Continue reading India’s new Operating system developed by Defence Research and Development Organization, DRDO

Oil and gas reserves found in Mianwali

BY KHALEEQ KIANI

ISLAMABAD: The Mari Petroleum Company Limited (MPCL) announced on Friday to have discovered reserves of crude oil, condensate and natural gas in its Karak Block’s Kalabagh Well in Mianwali.

In a statement issued here, the company said the hydrocarbon deposit was found in Kalabagh-1A ST1 Well. The Karak Joint Venture is operated by MPCL which holds 60 per cent working interest and the MOL of Hungary with 40 per cent share.

Also read: Large reserves of crude oil found in Sindh

The discovery is the company’s second success in the block, after its first major crude oil discovery at Halini Well-1 in 2011.

Read more » DAWN
See more » http://www.dawn.com/news/1207980

Pakistan’s First Female Truck Driver

Pakistan’s first female truck driver has a message to the women of her country: ‘nothing is too difficult.’ Shamim Akhtar hopes to be a role model after becoming the first Pakistani woman to get a driving license for heavy vehicles.But in a country where men dominate the roads, the journey to gender equality can be a bumpy one. (RFE/RL Pakistani Service).

Courtesy: YouTube