Gyan Hemnani talks about the idea of “Sindhhi Pradesh” in India.

Sindhi speaking people of India, migrated from the Sindh province of undivided India, after the partition on 14th August 1947.

The Sindh, gave the name Hind to the Nation. The archeological excavation of Mohan-Jo-Daro in Sindh, proved that Indus valley civilization was the oldest civilization of more than seven thousand years old, making India feel proud, among the community of World civilizations. But merely 67 years after partition, the same Sindh province has been forgotten completely. Most of the present Politicians and Administrators in Central government & the governments in provinces in the age group of 40-60 years, hear the word ‘SINDH’, only when the National Anthem is played on ceremonial occasions. They are therefore not aware of the betrayals, discriminations and injustices faced by Sindh and its people.
To put the issue of Sindhi Linguistic state in proper perspective, following historical facts are being introduced:-

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Rick Hillier says military can help bring in 50,000 refugees by Christmas

Former chief of defence staff outlines plan that includes transporting people by cruise ship

By Katharine Starr, Karen Jouhal, CBC News

The Canadian Forces could play a key role in helping to bring at least 50,000 Syrian refugees — far more than the government is planning— to Canada by Christmas, retired general Rick Hillier says.

“We’ve got these incredible leaders in the Canadian Forces, across the RCMP and many other places in our nation who are ready to step up,” he said in an interview with Rosemary Barton on CBC News Network’sPower & Politics.

Hillier, the former chief of the defence staff, called for the government to bring in at least 50,000 Syrian refugees over the next three months, a figure he called realistic.

Read more » CBC
See more » http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-election-2015-rick-hillier-refugees-military-christmas-1.3225732

Tragedy of Azad Kashmir

Nayyar1Evolving Political World and Tragedy of Azad Kashmir

By Nayyar N Khan

Part 1: Historical background

Beginning of cold war, formation of the United Nations, decolonization on a mammoth scale and escalation in national liberation movements across the globe were some of the major achievements of post-World War II. Our political world entered into a new phase of history in the mid-1940s after the upheavals of Hiroshima and Naga Saki. Process of decolonization in Indian sub-continent was also a reverberation of the revulsions and rumbles of WWII. There was no single process of decolonization. In some parts of the world, it was serene, and methodical. In many others, independence was achieved only after a long-drawn-out uprising because of the competitive political ideologies of Socialism and Capitalism. Both Soviet Union and United States headed their respective camps and our political world got divided on ideological eminences. A wave of national liberation movements across the continents toppled and dethroned the colonialism. Many of the newly independent countries assimilated stable governments almost immediately; others were ruled by authoritarians or military juntas for decades, or suffered long civil wars. Some European governments welcomed a new relationship with their former colonies; others disputed decolonization regimentally. The process of decolonization coincided with the new Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States, and with the early development of the new United Nations. Decolonization was often affected by superpower antagonism, and had a certain sway on the progress of that rivalry. It also ominously changed the configuration of international relations.

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