Is Greece close to Grexit?

The Greek government is running out of time and money.

If it fails to come to a deal with eurozone partners to secure the final tranche of its bailout, there is a real chance it could default on its loans.

That could push the Greek government towards leaving the single currency, otherwise known as Grexit.

How bare are Greece’s coffers?

Without an urgent cash-for-fiscal reforms deal, the leftist Syriza government will run out of cash. And that deal needs to be agreed by the end of June, when Greece’s bailout deal with its eurozone creditors runs out.
Somehow, the money was scraped together to survive €1bn (£730m; $1.1bn) in debt payments to the International Monetary Fund in May, but Greece has already postponed June payments to the IMF and further hefty bills are due, to the IMF, European Central Bank and holders of short-term treasury bills.

The government in Athens has called on public sector bodies including hospitals to surrender any cash reserves they have.
The mayor of Greece’s second city, Thessaloniki, has already handed over millions.
Without at least part of the final €7.2bn slice of its giant EU-IMF bailout, Greece would almost certainly default on its debts.
Greeks see cash run out in undeclared default.

Can it stay afloat?

The message from Greece’s government is a resounding no. Quite simply it has too many debts to pay in too short a period.
At the start of June, Mr Tsipras’s government announced it would roll its four June payments to the IMF into one, giving it until the end of the month to find the necessary €1.5bn.
But it also needs to find another €2.2bn in June for public sector salaries, pensions and social security payments.

For a populist, left-wing party like Syriza, it would be unthinkable to pay its debts to creditors ahead of funding pensions for 2.6 million Greeks and some 600,000 civil servant salaries. It has already moved to re-employ 4,000 civil servants whom the previous government got rid of.
Greece’s last cash injection from its international creditors was in August, so the final €7.2bn instalment from its two EU-IMF bailouts, worth €240bn in total, is now seen as vital.
Even then Greece is likely to need a third bailout worth tens of billions. But if Greece’s reform package fails to satisfy its creditors, there will be no new cash.

Read more » BBC
See more » http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-32332221

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