Taliban suspected of sexually abusing young boys

Though the militants attempt to impose their harsh interpretation of Islamic law on others, they themselves are hypocrites, sources confirm.

ISLAMABAD – Taliban exploitation of young boys for sex is common in parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan, Central Asia Online has learnt through interviews with analysts, military officers, clerics and a former militant.

Read more » Central Asia Online
http://centralasiaonline.com/en_GB/articles/caii/features/pakistan/main/2013/08/13/feature-01

Sindh Caucus : An Exhibition of Sindhi Art at Capitol Hill

Congressional Sindh Caucus :An Exhibition of Sindhi Art at Capitol Hill

Washington DC: We invite friends and supporters in joining the Congressional Sindh Caucus in presenting An Exhibition of Sindhi Art “Umar Marvi” by Uzma Kazmi. Featuring Sindhi Artists Uzma Kazmi and Jani Abro Uzma Kazmi’s work illustrates the realistic aspect, glimpses of folk tale inspired by mystic poetry of Latif Sarkar (Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai).

On September 10th, 2013, 5:30–8:00 pm. At 1539 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515

Sindhi people enjoy a rich history and culture reflective of their diverse community and traditions, which includes Sufism (Mysticism). This is a night to honor the ancient way of life of this 5,000 year-old Indus valley civilization. We are here to help show support on behalf of the Sindhis.

Courtesy: Sindhi e-lists/ e-groups, August 14, 2013

Chomsky: The U.S. Behaves Nothing Like a Democracy, But You’ll Never Hear About It in Our ‘Free Press’

In a powerful speech, Chomsky lays out how the majority of US policies are practically opposite of what wide swathes of the public wants.

By Noam Chomsky

August 15, 2013  | The following is a transcript of a recent speech delivered Noam Chomsky in Bonn, Germany, at DW Global Media Forum, Bonn, Germany. You can read more speeches by Chomsky here.

I’d like to comment on topics that I think should regularly be on the front pages but are not – and in many crucial cases are scarcely mentioned at all or are presented in ways that seem to me deceptive because they’re framed almost reflexively in terms of doctrines of the powerful.

In these comments I’ll focus primarily on the United States for several reasons: One, it’s the most important country in terms of its power and influence. Second, it’s the most advanced – not in its inherent character, but in the sense that because of its power, other societies tend to move in that direction. The third reason is just that I know it better. But I think what I say generalizes much more widely – at least to my knowledge, obviously there are some variations. So I’ll be concerned then with tendencies in American society and what they portend for the world, given American power.

American power is diminishing, as it has been in fact since its peak in 1945, but it’s still incomparable. And it’s dangerous. Obama’s remarkable global terror campaign and the limited, pathetic reaction to it in the West is one shocking example. And it is a campaign of international terrorism – by far the most extreme in the world. Those who harbor any doubts on that should read the report issued by Stanford University and New York University, and actually I’ll return to even more serious examples than international terrorism.

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Nawaz Sharif: a sloppy start to national security

By Dr. Mohammad Taqi

Without a holistic strategy addressing Afghanistan, India and also the United States, Mr Sharif cannot even begin to solve the domestic terrorism problem

Two months into his third stint, Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and his core team’s handling of the national security debate has been cavalier and sloppy at best, and downright dangerous at worst. The ostensibly well-oiled political machine that was supposed to have replaced the chaotic governance of the outgoing Pakistan People’s Party (PPP) has yet to issue a coherent statement on the domestic counterterrorism issue and the national security and foreign policies, which Mr Sharif and his associates have been promising after every major terrorist attack. About 60 terror incidents in as many days have not really instilled a sense of urgency. No sane person wants Mr Sharif’s government to fail on the anti-terrorism front or elsewhere for that matter.

We had noted here at the start of Mr Sharif’s term that “his cautious approach early in his stint is understandable but if Mr Sharif does not delineate his idea of the national interest, chances are that the usual suspects who have had a chokehold on formulating such definitions will do it for him. It might not be too long before the Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) finds in its lap issues like the Kerry-Lugar-Berman Act, which were used to set the national security narrative against the PPP.” Also, within days of President Asif Zardari’s October 2008 interview with The Wall Street Journal to start with a clean slate in India, the Mumbai massacre was unleashed. With the volatility along the Pakistan-India Line of Control in Kashmir, Mr Sharif already has a mini-Mumbai situation on his hands, if not something worse. His previous generic remark that ‘Pakistan and India should be friends’ is not enough. The usual suspects may be defining the national interest for Mr Sharif and perhaps the domestic redlines that they don’t want him to cross.

Continue reading Nawaz Sharif: a sloppy start to national security