Zulfiqar Mirza and the role of media?

Sadly, almost all anchors of major news channels seemed to add fuel to fire. The questions, mostly, were instigating the participants to repeat the same mistake as committed by Mr. Zulfiqar Mirza, the anchors should have acted responsibly. Critical questions could have been avoided. Controversial personalities shouldn’t have been telecast on National TV channels.

Courtesy: Aaj Tv News (Bolta Pakistan with Mushtaq Minhas and Nusrat Javaid – 14th july 2011 part- 3)

via → ZemTv →  YouTube

Has Zulfiqar Mirza become a liability for PPP?

Quotation → “It’s easy to criticize others, but it is difficult to find ills within. If citizens tolerate plague among them, they will lose moral authority to criticize or fight against the oppressor.” [!– author: unknown –!?]

Courtesy: ARY News Tv (Pakistan Tonight with Fahad Hussain, 14th July 2011 -1)

via ZemTVYouTube

Mini cold war on Afghan frontier – by Dr Mohammad Taqi

– You know something has gone really awry in the Pak-US relationship when the Pakistanis bring out their heavy political artillery against the US. Now who would not take Pakistan’s Defence Minister Chaudhry Ahmed Mukhtar seriously? Speaking to a television channel, the defence minister has threatened to withdraw Pakistani troops from the Pak-Afghan border as a response to the US decision to suspend roughly $ 800 million in military aid to Pakistan.

One can imagine that this tit-for-tat reaction from a minister who is indispensible to Pakistan’s security planning must have sent Admiral Mike Mullen, along with the joint chiefs committee, looking for cover. So indispensible is the minister that he was on a personal trip to the US — attending graduation ceremonies at Harvard, among other things — when the defence committee of the cabinet met twice in the wake of the OBL fiasco this past May. Can it not get more farcical than the security establishment firing from Chaudhry Mukhtar’s shoulder while General Kayani pretends to be a cool customer presiding over the corps commanders’ meeting?

Under the prevailing situation along the Durand Line, with both Pakistan and Afghanistan alleging that the other is violating the frontier, Pakistan would not venture into pulling back a single soldier. More than that, the Pakistan Army officials have declared on record that many of the Taliban-affiliated groups are their strategic assets. A pull-back would mean loss of protection for these assets rendering them to be likely targets for the ISAF, especially if the militants try to escalate things. So who is the Pakistani establishment kidding? Even the lamest bravado has to be tad tangible.

A few weeks ago, I had noted in these pages: “Osama bin Laden’s lair, less than a mile away from the Pakistan Military Academy, Kakul, is not a pinprick that the world, let alone the US, would forget so easily. The Pakistani parliament may have been duped with it, but there is every indication that the US Congress and the White House consider the ‘intelligence failure’ excuse an insult to their intelligence. Senator Kerry’s soft but measured tone indicates that the Pakistani brass still has some time, perhaps through July, to make serious amends but all options, including moving the UN, remain on the table. The senator also seems to have spelt out some of the bare-minimum metrics for any rapprochement…the dismantling of the Haqqani network is at the top of the confidence-building agenda. The military events surrounding Senator Kerry’s Pak-Afghan visits suggest that the US is not about to blink first” (‘Pakistan and the US: beyond the tailspin’, Daily Times, May 19, 2011).

So here we are in mid-July and the US has issued what is still a relatively mild rebuke, through suspension of the military aid. However, the way the geopolitical narrative in the post-OBL phase is shaping up, the current US measures have the undesirable potential of snowballing into more robust sanctions and further isolation of Pakistan. Both the US and Pakistan have few good options in the mini cold war, which they are fighting on the Afghan frontier but obviously the Pakistani choices are much more limited. The much-trumpeted Chinese support will subsidise neither the technological nor budgetary shortfall. Also, the détente that exists between the US and China and is not about to change soon. Admiral Mullen took off for China immediately after his remarks that implicated the Pakistani brass in Syed Saleem Shahzad’s murder. Short of threatening a regional destabilisation by militant proxies, including through blocking NATO routes, or its perpetual staple of ‘you cannot mess with a nuclear-armed country’, Pakistani deep state has little to fall back upon.

For some reason, the Pakistani establishment — and indeed a large section of the population — remains of the view that the world, especially the US, is out to get them and the regional and world powers are setting up tripwires for them at every step. This is followed by the perennial chorus about how the US ditched us after the Soviet withdrawal and the relations with the US having been transactional and utilitarian rather than strategic. The establishment, then, like Don Quixote, riding on his horse Rocinante –the right-wing media in this case — goes tilting at the US-Indo-Zionist windmills. But what really takes the cake is invoking the anti-US sentiment prevalent in Pakistan and how it will become worse if the aid spigot is turned off. What is lost on the Pakistani brass is that a zero-sum security paradigm is ancient history.

The Pakistani military leadership has been betting on a US withdrawal from Afghanistan that leaves the field wide open for them. It is an erroneous assumption and will likely result in the Pakistani security establishment biting off more than it can chew. It is equally wrong to assume that Afghanistan would portend any threat to Pakistan in foreseeable future. Also, in the wake of Ahmed Wali Karzai’s assassination, a continued US presence in Afghanistan after 2014 is almost a foregone conclusion. Three large US bases along with at least 25,000 troops, supported by robust air power is what the Pakistani brass will be grappling with if they are eyeing the Kabul throne for their chosen militants. The Pakistani civil and military leaders must recognise that their objective of imposing a 1996-style Pakistani puppet government in Kabul is neither legitimate nor attainable. After his brother’s murder, even the capricious Hamid Karzai — known for his occasional footsie with Pakistan — is unlikely to go along with any Pakistani designs on Kabul.

The mood in the US is reflective of an Americanism: “Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me.” The Obama administration had bad and worse choices vis-à-vis Pakistan to select from. The US government is not known to rush into making decisions and the present one is no different. It appears to be a considered opinion of the US administration and the lawmakers that in the fight against the extremist forces, the Pakistani army and the civilian government cannot be counted on due to lack of will and power, respectively. What the US must not lose sight of is the difficult but imperative task of helping ensure a relatively stable Afghan government, without which a prolonged US presence in Afghanistan is meaningless. And equally important is continued US support for Pakistan’s democratic dispensation, which is likely to get caught in the crossfire as the mini cold war escalates.

Courtesy: → Daily Times

Pakistan: The Power of Intelligence Agencies

by Hassan N. Gardezi

Excerpt;

Preamble – The discovery of Osama bin Laden in Abbotabad and his killing by US commandos has raised serious concerns about the performance of Pakistan’s intelligence agencies. The country’s interior minister Rehman Malik, besieged by allegations of incompetence and complicity went on the defensive, pleading that his government was not aware of Osama’s whereabouts until the US attack on his fortified mansion on May 2. He insisted that it was just a case of accidental failure of Pakistani intelligence agencies, similar to the failure of the US intelligence to detect the perpetrators of 9/11 as they planed their attacks within America.

While giving a briefing on the Abbotabad incident to the in-camera session of both houses of parliament on May13, Gen. Ahmed Shuja Pasha, chief of the Inter-services Intelligence Directorate (ISI), also reportedly admitted the “failure” of his agency, offering to resign from his post while adding that it was “not intentional” failure. ….

…. It will be naive to conclude that these happenings in Pakistan are accidents of history or failures of the country’s ruling elite who do not know what they are doing. These incidents and other events which have brought Pakistan to where it stands today are part of the logical unfolding of the paradigm of governance adopted consciously and purposefully by successive governments of Pakistan since the inception of the state in 1947. More on this later, but what is pertinent to note here is that the core of this ruling paradigm is the political use of Islam, the essence of the Islamist enterprise. In this respect the present governing establishment is in competition with the militant Islamists, not in conflict.

To read complete article → SOUTH ASIA CITIZENS WEB

Does Britain back MQM’s violence? By Shiraz Paracha

– The British government shares some responsibility for violence in Karachi as wanted criminals use their UK bases to incite hate and violence in Pakistan.

Altaf Hussain, a British citizen and a mafia style leader of a linguistic group, everyday violates the British ‘Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994’ and the ‘Racial and Religious Hatred Act 2006’ by inciting hatred and encouraging bloodshed in Pakistan.

Under the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 the following are arrestable offences in Britain:

a) Deliberately provoking hatred of a racial group. b) Distributing racist material to the public. c) Making inflammatory public speeches. d) Creating racist websites on the Internet.

From his London headquarters, Hussain gives hours long hate speeches over the phone to supporters of his party, the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM), in Pakistan. The MQM applies latest telecommunication technology to instantly spread Hussain’s hate speeches to thousands of people in different Pakistani cities.

In British law a hate speech is defined as:

“A gesture or conduct, writing, or display which is forbidden because it may incite violence or prejudicial action against or by a protected individual or group, or because it disparages or intimidates a protected individual or group. The law may identify a protected individual or a protected group by race, gender, ethnicity, nationality, religion, sexual orientation, or other characteristic”.

The British law forbids “communication which is hateful, threatening, abusive, or insulting and which targets a person on account of skin colour, race, nationality (including citizenship), ethnic or national origin, religion, or sexual orientation. The penalties for hate speech include fines, imprisonment, or both.”

A fugitive, Altaf Hussain, is wanted in many criminal cases including murder and abduction in Pakistan. He had absconder to the United Kingdom in the early 1990s. Surprisingly, he was given British citizenship. Ever since he has been involved in crimes against people of Pakistan and his mercenaries have turned Karachi into a city of death and destruction.

Several of Hussain’s lieutenants in London are criminal gangsters who have been accused of murdering innocent people in Pakistan. ….

Read more → LET US BUILD PAKISTAN

14 killed in Karachi… Who is responsible… Zulfiqar Mirza or ?

by S.M.K Durrani

I fail to understand, what are we protesting for, what is wrong with the statement of Dr.Mirza, do we want to deny the historical facts and contribution made by the people of Sindh at the time of Partition, rehabilitating the new comers. The young generation may not be knowing the contribution of Sindhis, Please ask somebody senior in age, he may be able to narrate the help extended by the people of Sindh. My parents settled in Hyderabad, I know the elders of the than Hyderabad whole heartedly welcomed our elders. Specially Kazi Family of Hyderabad, Dr. Fahmida Mirza is his grand daughter, I don’t feel shy to tell that when my elders along with hundreds other people reached Hyderabad, they were in one pair of clothes for months and were hungry since days, such things are not known to our youth, we need not to feel uncomfortable, rather we may pay thanks to our Sindhi borther and sisters that made us what we are today. His selection of words may not be good or may be delivery of words may not be proper, but what he said is fact and nobody can deny. As far as any utterance against MQM or Altaf bhai is concerned, as a political party MQM should show maturity, responsibility, patience and should show restrain, its a political matter, should reply democratically, without leading to bloodshed. Fourteen innocent people have already died, what more are we looking for. Is there any justification to kill the innocent people over a statement. The leadership and workers of all parties should react in political way. For God sake we should stop all this and learn to live in peace with each other,that is where we can grow,if we love our country, we should forget and forgive, rather that further complicating the relations. My words may not be appreciated, I appeal to the saner elements of MQM and the society to work for the betterment.

Courtesy: Pakistani e-lists/ e-groups,Thursday, July 14, 2011

What would Edhi sahib do? By- Dr. Shazia Nawaz

Yes, just as here in USA you would ask before doing something, “what would Jesus do?” There in Pakistan we ask, “what would Edhi sahib do?” He is our Jesus (Masiha), so, it is not surprising that someone in their desperation went to Edhi sahib for the solution of current killings in Pakistan.

In his infinite wisdom, Edhi sahib recommended more killings to stop the current killings. And if you see it in a context of ‘what would edhi do?’ It is shocking to some, but really, it is not that shocking at all coming from a Pakistani man. Our answer to every problem is killing someone. What should we do with a robber with a plastic gun? Kill him. What should we do with boys who played cricket in our play ground without permission? Kill them of course. What should we do with the journalist who comes in our way of ‘peaceful’ protest? Kill him. And of course what should we do with all the non-muslims and with all the muslims who does not follow our sect? Kill them all.

And we are doing it? Once someone says, “Let us kill him”, someone does. Thank God (or out of control hormones), Pakistanis are reproducing like cats. We kill 20 today, 100 babies are born the next day. So, if anyone thinks that Pakistanis can be eliminated from the face of earth, they are seriously mistaken. We know how to grow like wild flowers, or weed for that matter. We are more in number every morning. And we do not waste time on finding difficult solutions like these damn civilized nations. We kill the problem right there. That is it!

Only few were shocked by Edhi sahib’s call to Kiyani for the massive killings of the politicians. …

Read more → LUBP