Punjab – Sindh : Troubled waters

Sindh

Editorial : Troubled waters

With both the Punjab and Sindh holding firm on their stance over the controversial opening of the Chashma-Jhelum link canal, which has led the member of the Indus River System Authority (Irsa) from Sindh and the federation to ready their resignations, the prime minister has been forced to intervene. He will be attempting to pour oil over the churning waters. But even as he does so, there seems to be a realisation that the structure of Irsa may need to be altered to prevent the periodic tidal waves that erupt and threaten to cause a great deal of damage.The orders issued by the member from the Punjab, who is also acting chairman of the authority, would serve the interests of his province but damage those of Sindh by reducing flow down the Indus. To rub salt into wounds, the Punjab has now sought additional water through the canal. There is quite evidently an element of selfishness in the way water is demanded by each province, heedless of the needs of others. The battles between the Punjab and Sindh represent nothing new. But if we look at the matter realistically and dispassionately, it seems almost inevitable that this will happen. The Punjab, as the majority province, has not been known for its sensitivity to the concerns of others. And hence the current acrimony on this issue, with the smaller provinces clearly feeling discriminated against.

Read more >>- The Express Tribune

Kurram residents travel through Kabul to reach Peshawar

Peshawar-bound bus attacked in Afghanistan; 11 killed

Due to the closure of the Tull-Parachinar road, passengers from the area these days take the Afghanistan route to reach Peshawar.

PESHAWAR: Eleven people were killed on Saturday when unknown armed men fired on a passenger bus in Afghanistan’s Waza area, DawnNews reported.

The bus had initially departed from Parachinar and was on its way to Peshawar via Afghanistan.

Due to the closure of the Tull-Parachinar road, passengers from the area these days take the Afghanistan route to reach Peshawar.

Today’s incident occurred when the bus was crossing Afghanistan’s Waza area in the war-torn country’s Paktia province.

Read more >>- DAWN

There is hope for Muslims, and it comes from Bangladesh

Fatwa illegal

HC rules against all extra-judicial punishments upon writ petitions

– Ashutosh Sarkar

The High Court in a verdict yesterday declared illegal all kinds of extrajudicial punishment including those made in the name of fatwa in local arbitration.

The court directed the authorities concerned to take punitive action against the people involved in enforcing fatwa against women.

Anyone involved, present or taking part in or assisting any such conviction or execution would come under purview of the offences under the penal code and be subject to punishment, the court observed.

It also observed infliction of brutal punishment including caning, whipping and beating in local salish [arbitration] by persons devoid of judicial authority constitutes violation of the constitutional rights.

The court said the people’s rights to life and equal protection have to be treated in accordance with the law.

As per the rules of the Constitution, the citizens will not be subject to cruel, inhumane and degrading treatment or punishment, the HC said.

The HC bench of Justice Syed Mahmud Hossain and Justice Gobinda Chandra Tagore came up with the verdict in response to three separate writs. The petitions were filed by rights organisations — Bangladesh Legal Aid and Services Trust (BLAST), Ain o Salish Kendra (ASK), Bangladesh Mahila Parishad, BRAC Human Rights and Legal Services, and Nijera Kori, and four Supreme Court lawyers — Advocate Salahuddin Dolon, Barrister Mahbub Shafique, Advocate AKM Hafizul Alam and Barrister Imaran-ul Hye.

Read more >>- The Daily Star

This is Radio Conspiracy FM-70 … ))))

by Nadeem F. Paracha

Hello this is Radio Conspiracy FM-70 and I’m your host and RJ, Ali Azmat. Today in the studios we have with us Pakistan’s leading DJ and rock star from the band Conquering Israel, Ghalat Hussain, hello Ghalat …

Hello. You’re bleeding.

Yes, I am. Maria B. said the colour red goes well with my wild shining bald.

Who beat you up? The cops?

No, no, I beat myself up. A bleeding forehead looks very dramatic on TV.

But we’re not on TV.

We’re not?

No. We’re on radio.

Damn! Why wasn’t I told?

You’re crazy.

I am?

Yes.

Gee, thanks. Okay, time for a song. Here’s a Peo TV jhankaar version of ‘Kill The Ahmedis.’ Yum. That’s my favourite. Just give me a minute to prepare.

Prepare?

Yes. (Bang! Bang! Bang!)

What the … ?? Why are you banging your head on the wall?? You’re bleeding again.

I want to look dramatic when you play that song.

But you’re on radio. Nobody can see you.

I’m on radio?

Yes.

Damn! Why wasn’t I told?

You’re crazy.

Right. We already have a caller on line. Hello?

Hello.

Who’s this?

Imran Khan.

Arrey, Imran bhai! How are you?

….

Read more >>- blogDawn

End of the River?

Of the two largest Southasian deltas, one flourishes as the other faces the threat of being overrun by the sea.

by Amar Guriro

At a time when melting glaciers, shrinking coastal lands, depleting freshwater sources and vanishing forests are hot issues across the world, the tidal mangrove forests of the Sundarban constitute an encouraging example of effective conservation. Spread over 10,000 sq km in India and Bangladesh, with some 60 percent falling in the latter, the Sundarban, part of the Ganges delta, the world’s largest, takes in the endpoints of the mighty Ganga, Meghna and Brahmaputra rivers. A fusion zone of fresh- and saltwater, constituting a complex network of tidal waterways, vast scattered mudflats and hundreds of small islands filled with salt-tolerant mangroves, and home to a dizzying array of plants and animals, the Sundarban was recognised as a World Heritage Site in 1987.

Continue reading End of the River?