Indo-Pak : Three wars on, making peace!

He is calling for “treaty of peace, security, and friendship.”

Like many Indians from humble beginnings, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh might well describe himself as a son of the soil. But in his case, the soil happens to be Pakistani. The 77-year- old Singh was born in Gah, once part of British India and n0w in Pakistan’s Punjab province.

Two years ago, India’s national  media was entranced when a villager from Gah made an appearance in New Delhi to meet his childhood chum “Mohana.”

While the friend had dropped out of school and gone to work in the fields, Singh – also born into poverty – studied by kerosene lamp, eventually winning scholarships to Cambridge and Oxford, where he studied economics. Singh whose family moved to Amritsar, India, after partition in 1947, promised the visiting friend that, one day, a new road and school in Gah would be named after Singh. That is unlikely development, however, considering India and Pakistan’s strained relations.

The two have gone to war three times since they were carved out of British India. Senior Indian journalists say Singh has long showed a soft spot for Pakistan. He is calling for a “treaty of peace, security, and friendship” with the neighbouring country, a prospect some in both nations would resist.

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Ahmadis are Pakistan’s Palestinians!

I never really cared for Ahmadis – By Fasi Zaka

Tribune

I have never really been vocal about rights for Ahmadis, even privately, but my compassion trigger is easily pulled if there are atrocities against Pakistani Hindus and Christians. Part of this can be ascribed to my belief in the prejudice that the Ahmadis are a relatively well-off community, making the Christians and Hindus of Pakistan uniquely guilty of a double crime, first for not being Muslims and second for being poor. These two communities seem especially vulnerable. I have changed my mind. And it’s not because of the attack in Lahore that killed so many Ahmadis. The whole country, Muslim and non-Muslim, is under attack by the Taliban.

What really helped me see the inhuman treatment of the Ahmadis in Pakistan is the absence of condemnation for it. Nawaz Sharif in his condolence message said Ahmadis were our brothers; it’s been enough to get the Pakistani religious world on his case. While sympathy is not outlawed for Ahmadis, it may as well be.

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Hate speech – Dawn Editorial

A strong case can be made against the Jamaat-i-Islami (JI) leader for fomenting aggression and religious persecution under the country’s laws regarding hate speech and incitement to violence.

DAWN

The street power and political clout wielded by Pakistan’s religious right have resulted in the state and society being held hostage by extremist elements. The latter stop at nothing to further their agenda of inciting hatred, divisiveness and violence. The latest example is that of the Jamaat-i-Islami chief, Syed Munawwar Hasan, who during a sermon in Lahore on Friday threatened a fresh movement against the Ahmadi community if it “did not accept their minority status” and the government kept silent about “their blasphemous and unconstitutional activities”.

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US-Pakistan Friendship Day at the Capitol Hill – June 24

The Annual US-Pakistan Friendship Day by Pakistani American Congress at the Capitol Hill. Here are the details: Time: 11 Am – 5 PM, June 24, 2010, Seminar: 11 AM – 2 PM

Sustainability of Democracy in Pakistan

Guest Speakers: 1) Geoffrey R. Pyatt, Principal Deputy Secretary of State. 2) Ms. Theresa Grenick, Deputy Director, Office of Ambassador Richard Holbrooke. 3) Stephen Cohen, Senior Fellow at Brookings Institute. 4) Robert Hathaway, Senior Fellow at Woodrow Wilson, International Center for Scholars. 5) Dr. Marvin Weinbaum, Senior Scholar, The Middle East Institute. 6) David Jones, Washington Post

Congressional Reception: 2PM – 5 PM

US Congressmen and Senators, Venue – 2226 Rayburn House Office Building, Capitol Hill, Washington DC.

Don’t blame the army for all Pakistan’s problems.

Land of the impure

Don’t blame the army for all Pakistan’s problems. Just most of them

The Economist/blogs/banyan

THREE score years and a bit after its founding, Pakistan—which means land of the pure—still struggles to look like a nation. Economically backward, politically stunted and terrorised by religious extremists, it would be enough to make anyone nervous, even if it did not have nuclear weapons. For these shortcomings, most of the blame should be laid at the door of the army, which claims, more than any other institution, to embody nationhood. Grossly unfair? If the army stood before one of its own tribunals, the charge sheet would surely run as follows:

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Taking on the Taliban – Globe Editorial

Get tough with Pakistan’s [….]

Boston.com

THE UNITED States and NATO cannot endure an open-ended military commitment in Afghanistan. But they know — or should know — that there can be no hope of ending the war unless Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence agency stops arming, funding, and training Afghan insurgent groups.

President Obama must recognize the necessity of persuading Pakistan’s military leaders, who control the ISI, to stop playing a double game with America. This can be done. Washington has valuable carrots to offer and credible threats to make. To succeed, however, Obama must be willing to play hardball.

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Translation of Sindhi poet Aasi Mehmood Zamini [Sindhi to English]

Translation by Hisam Memon

Come down

For a while today!

Speak thee

And let me speak!

Come down

For a while

Do watch the world,

Engineered by you!

Some are inferior/poor

Some are superior/rich

Who belong to you?

Do mark them!

Wrinkled is the veil,

Torn shirt she puts on,

The naked she looks,

Who daughter is that girl?

She begs before stranger men,

Offer alms to your people!

Without breakfast

And bare-footed,

She ploughs

In the scorching beam,

Unbuttered pieces of meal,

She takes with spoilt molasses

Come down to taste it

A single time!

AASI’ was bestowed with insight

That utters the truth and tormented for,

“Why I am called atheist then”

Come to get [insight] it back!

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Demands Fundamental Rights of the People’s Self Determination and Autonomy

by: Khalid Hashmani, McLean, Virginia, USA

One must admire World Sindhi Congress (WSC) for its continuous efforts to live up to the objectives of their charter. Relentlessly, this organization has struggled for the rights of Sindhis on many international fronts. Their diligent pleas, presentations, and persuasive arguments have resulted many Europeans to become familiar with the plight of Sindhis.

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