Will you be able to cope Swine flu?

What is H1N1?  H1N1 once referred to as “Swine flu,” is a new influenza virus first detected in people in the U.S. or Mexico in April 2009. It is now spreading person-to-person worldwide, in much the same way that regular seasonal influenza spreads.

Many people have at least partial immunity to seasonal flu viruses through previous infections or vaccinations but viruses genetically change over time. But the new H1N1 virus is not the usual virus of H1N1. It come to humans from a different evolutionary line. That means very few people have any natural immunity to the new H1n1.

HOW DO YOU KNOW IT IS COLD OR FLU? Doctors recommend taking your temperature as a first step. Symptoms such as nasal congestion, cough, aches and malaise are a part of colds, seasonal flu and H1N1 flu. But a common cold rarely has symptoms of fever above 101F. The severity of H1N1 cases in the current outbreak has varied widely from mild cases to fatalities. The vast majority of cases have been mild. But many of the complicated cases have appeared in young people aged 5 to 24. Women and particularly pregnant women have also been vulnerable to swine flu.

This may help: Wash your hands regularly with soap and water, especially after coughing or sneezing. Avoid close contact with people who have flu-like symptoms. Avoid touching your mouth, nose or eyes. If you have flu-like symptoms stay home until you have been symptom-free and take fresh air breath. Breastfeeding mothers with flu symptoms should feed their child by other means. Take lot of orange/lemon juice or vitamin C. Avoid exercise during flu symptoms. Take tea without sugar and milk. Brush teeth three times daily and rinse your mouth by antiseptic gargles.