Federalism, Decentralization, and Provincial Autonomy in Pakistan- A meeting with Jami Chandio in Washington DC

Report by: Khalid Hashmani, USA

EVENT: Luncheon Meeting with Mr. Jami Chandio in Washington DC
DATE & TIME: Sunday, January 25, 2009 at 1:30 PM Sharp VENUE: Aabshar Restaurant, 6550 Backlick Road, Springfield, VA 22150
Mr. Chandio is currently doing work with Washington DC-based The National Endowment for Democracy (NED). The focus of his work on the studying of the problems of federalism and prospects for provincial autonomy, including constitutional mechanisms that can be used to prevent, manage, and resolve intra-state conflict in Pakistan.


http://www.ned.org/forum/current.html# Chandio
Mr. Jami Chandio (Pakistan)
“Federalism, Decentralization, and Provincial Autonomy in Pakistan”
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow, January-May 2009
Phone: 202-378-9700, ext. 240
Email: jamic@ned.org
Mr. Jami Chandio is executive director of the Center for Peace and Civil Society (CPCS), a think tank based in Pakistan’s Sindh province. He edits CPCS’ quarterly journal Freedom and oversees year-long seminars on democracy that target civil society, especially young journalists.
One of Pakistan’s most celebrated journalists, Mr. Chandio is the former editor of Ibrat, Pakistan’s largest Sindhi-language daily newspaper, a former anchor on Sindh TV and KTN, and former chair of the Liberal Forum of Pakistan.
The only two-time winner of the All Pakistan Newspapers Society Award (in 2000 and 2001), he has authored more than a dozen books in Sindhi, Urdu, and English, including Beyond Headlines and Sound-bites: A Handbook for Reporting on Democracy and Good Governance (published by the Centre for Civic Education Pakistan).
He has worked with the National Democratic Institute (NDI) in Pakistan as a political expert since 2004. During his fellowship, Mr. Chandio is studying the problems of federalism and prospects for provincial autonomy, including constitutional mechanisms that can be used to prevent, manage, and resolve intra-state conflict in Pakistan.
http://www.ned.org/
The National Endowment for Democracy (NED) is a private, nonprofit organization created in 1983 to strengthen democratic institutions around the world through nongovernmental efforts. The Endowment is governed by an independent, nonpartisan board of directors. With its annual congressional appropriation, it makes hundreds of grants each year to support prodemocracy groups in Africa, Asia, Central and Eastern Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and the former Soviet Union.

7 thoughts on “Federalism, Decentralization, and Provincial Autonomy in Pakistan- A meeting with Jami Chandio in Washington DC”

  1. Assalam alikum
    Respected Sir,
    I,m students of M.Phil!!
    I like & study ur sucessful try as essay
    & knowledgeable Books.

  2. I think the present Government has committed such attrocity in the eyes of establishment to plan towards decentralization and moving slowly towards provincial autonomy and recent cultural unity in Sindh where lacs of people gathered ,demonstrated their aspiration to be the Nation near to completion of its elements .
    Now the Sindhi Nation has become a complete Nation.

    Nation having a common language, common teretoritory, common culture,common economic connections.the later were not in its smooth shape everbefore.

    shabbir lashari
    03082260314

  3. it is note worthy to mentioned that above article was no dobut the a document which enhance the new discussion and create ideas for further exploring the issue.Jami chandio has done much in the feild of literature. i appricaite him

  4. Assalam alikum
    Honourable …. !!!
    we people of sindh,& students of university of sindh!!
    we like & study ur sucessful try as essey, as lecture
    & knowledgeable Books.

    .

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